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Jeep Wrangler Maintenance and Repair Questions (up to 1996)

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  • I do not have a remote. I guess I missed what you mentioned in your post..please repost. THANKS
  • Going to assume that you've checked the following: distributor cap (not cracked or wet inside), rotor inside distributor, coil wire. My Jeep (1995) has two fuel filters, one in the gas tank and one external, don't know about 94's. How long has this been happening? When the engine quits, does everything else shut off too? With engine running, turn everything electrical on one at a time; radio, lights, a/c or blower, lights. Then check turn signals right and left, high beams, shift thru the gears, hit the brakes. I'm thinking it may be an electrical short somewhere shorting the system. I also assume you've checked all of the fuses. My Jeep started cutting out on me last summer, but never quit like your's is doing. I added some fuel injector cleaner to the gas for about a month and it cleared that up.
    If it's none of the things above, you may have to note the next few times it happens and try to find a common reason. Good luck and keep us posted.
  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,346
    Along with what the poster above mentioned, try to rule out ice in gas by adding some methyl hydrate or I think in the US u have something called Heet.

    I don't think it is ice tho from what you are saying.

    I thought the engine was shutting off at random, but u mention being able to start it by/at the starter itself, so it also has a random no start when this happens? Whenever starter problems confirm it is not the shifter linkage. Try neutral, wiggle it, Park, wiggle it etc.

    It does sound electrical somewhere. I would look at the sub or accessory wires at the battery terminals. (they are a lot smaller gauge than the big high current cables) check for corrosion, altho to be honest I have looked at connectors and they looked fine, only to discover they actually had electrolysis inside and was the culprit, so they can be tricky. The fact that it is running, quits, get it running again, u might be able to duplicate this by wiggling that wire with engine running. If it happens going over bumps makes it very suspect to electrical also. You have no remote car starter and no security alarm either?

    I admit i am a bit confused now tho what your Jeep is doing and when.
  • Maybe I missed it in the conversation, but do you have an alarm system on your vehicle? Could be a short there.
  • gbmorr13gbmorr13 Posts: 2
    I don't know what my problem is with my 4 cylinder 95 Jeep Wrangler with manual 5 speed transmission. I have over 140K miles and it just started slipping today. No matter what gear I'm in; when I accelerate... the RPM's go up and it almost sounds like I am out of gear or at least something is slipping with no power. When I back off of the accelerator it begins to drive normally. Nothing is popping out of gear and each gear seems to go in and out of gear easily and normally. It is the slipping of power that has just started. I don't know if that means a transmission problem or clutch or something else. Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks
  • samm43samm43 Posts: 195
    With what you have said so far, it sounds like it could be a clutch problem.
    Does it go in and out of gear easily at rest or only on the fly? At rest, try to put into 3rd or 4th, as they are usually don't use synchronizers which would camouflage a gear engagement issue.

    Does it use a hydraulic clutch? Your OM will help you know this, check under maintenance schedule. Look for a small reservoir near the firewall like a smaller version of the brake master cylinder reservoir and see if it is at proper level. Although if it were getting air it would make it hard to go into gear at rest. If it is cabled clutch then see how much free-play at the top of clutch pedal when out. There should be some. At least a half inch, but any amount at all is key. If there is consistent resistance from the beginning,then that is probably your problem right there and a cable adjustment will probably fix you up. Unless you have burned the clutch out by slipping it. This can happen in a very short period of time, especially on a 140k miles clutch depending on your clutch habits. (hours, or even minutes)

    Are there any trace amounts of oil leaks where transmission bolts to engine? If a rear main seal were to leak it might get on clutch. The reason I wonder this is usually a clutch going bad and starting to slip, does it gradually. You first start to notice it in higher gears going up a grade and you have some warning that it is going out. Sounds like this just started right away?

    Sam
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I have over 140K miles and it just started slipping today. No matter what gear I'm in; when I accelerate... the RPM's go up and it almost sounds like I am out of gear or at least something is slipping with no power. When I back off of the accelerator it begins to drive normally. Nothing is popping out of gear and each gear seems to go in and out of gear easily and normally.

    Textbook symptoms of a worn or oil contaminated clutch, not a transmission issue.

    It's quite normal (a clutch wears, just like your brakes and tires) and if it's the original you got great mileage from it.

    Transmission has to be removed and a complete new clutch fitted.
  • gbmorr13gbmorr13 Posts: 2
    Thanks MAC24,

    That's what I was afarid of.

    Do you have any wild guess as to what kind of money we're talking about for a garage to do the repair? I'm fairly certain that it is well over my head to perform. I'm afraid it will cost more than the jeep is worth.

    Thanks for the help anyway!
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    edited March 2011
    I'm afraid it will cost more than the jeep is worth.

    Hopefully your Jeep isn't in such bad shape it's worth that little.

    A standard quality clutch set (cover, friction plate, release bearing, and centering tool) costs around $150 retail.
    Can't remember the exact labor time but a competent tech shouldn't take more than three hours. Cost will be dependent on labor rates in your area.

    Remember, this is a service and maintenance item which every owner of a manual transmission should budget for; just like they should for tires, brakes, shocks, suspension and steering joints, belts, and even wiper blades.
    They're all sacrificial items that wear as they do their job.
  • samm43samm43 Posts: 195
    Remember, this is a service and maintenance item which every owner of a manual transmission should budget for; just like they should for tires, brakes, shocks, suspension and steering joints, belts, and even wiper blades.
    They're all sacrificial items that wear as they do their job.


    Sorry, but I can't agree with this at all. Unless a clutch has known weaknesses such as in a 6 speed Matrix (just as an example) it should easily last as long as most engines. (350k miles and up) And I say this even if it does stop and go duty for 40 miles return 20 days a month. Yes, people often get way less. Technically a person can take a clutch out of a brand new car in the same day they purchase it with enough abuse. You will find there is a broad range of mileages that owners get out of a clutch.

    Many years ago when there were often only 3 speeds and first and reverse were quite tall, clutches didn't stand nearly as good a chance at doing 350k miles as they do in modern times (last 25 years) with 5+ speeds and quite low first gears. If someone does a lot of backing up with a heavy trailer and if reverse is quite tall that can easily take 150 k off. Or if where they park at home or work there is a hill that they are constantly backing into can take 80k off. People who don't get the extra high miles are usually ones who were taught bad habits that were passed down through the generations, like using the clutch to hold it at light on a grade, resting your foot on it taking out all the freeplay without realizing, not ensuring there is freeplay if it's not a hydraulic clutch and of course slipping it more than needed to go.

    But all that said, if a person gets 140k out a Jeep clutch on a 5 speed, that is not too bad and certainly wouldn't fall under any abuse category at all. With different habits still though, we wouldn't have had to be having this chat for at least another 140k.

    Sam
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Sorry, but I can't agree with this at all. Unless a clutch has known weaknesses such as in a 6 speed Matrix (just as an example) it should easily last as long as most engines. (350k miles and up)

    While you make perfectly good points about correct operational practice, we will have disagree as to whether or not a clutch should be expected to last 350K miles.
    While theoretically possible (maybe if all journeys were long, started on the flat, and no stops and starts were made along the way), but it's as much an extreme as the clutch that gets burnt out in a day.

    To look at either extreme and say "that's how long a clutch should last" is unreasonable.
    A clutch is an item that wears, it's not like a wheel rim for instance that can only fail by losing it's integrity, and the rate of wear will depend on a combination of operator technique and transmission load.
    I think it's reasonable to say "the average life of a clutch is between 100K and 150k miles", but anything else would imply an unreasonable expectation to the owner.

    While clutches can and do suffer mechanical failure, failure to transmit drive because of a worn friction plate does not meet that definition.
    The clutch is just one of the items that can be expected to wear and need replacement during the life of the vehicle, and I believe that to expect otherwise would be optimistic in the extreme.
  • samm43samm43 Posts: 195
    I forgot to take into consideration geographical location. Hilly towns will can reduce that 350 to 200 or less.

    I have had the opportunity to view clutches after very high miles in cars and heavy trucks by drivers who knew how to treat a manual. I have seen clutches only half worn with 200k miles on cars, and of course 100's of thousands of miles on heavy trucks. Remember, many of these trucks endure stop and go rush hour traffic in any major centre they frequent. Car drivers could use the same techniques as truck drivers do to get more life from their clutches. Pacing and anticipating stops is the one of the most effective. I will allow that my 350k estimate might be a bit high with cars, as wear will accelerate as less friction material is left because it cannot dissipate heat as effectively and is certainly high in hilly terrain. Not unheard of though. Many people don't keep their cars that long, but for fun ask around to a few who have actually kept their car for 400 or 500k miles ( a VW TDI owner for example) and ask how many clutches they have done. You might be surprised to learn that many will have not had to do a clutch yet. Yes it is a wear item, but like I mentioned before, so is an engine a wear item and many clutches will last as long and even outlast the engine.

    Of course if maintenance items or neglect is practiced (like not fixing a leaking rear main seal) then all bets are off.

    YMMV (this acronym really applies here this time, doesn't it?) ;) :shades:

    Sam
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    YMMV (this acronym really applies here this time, doesn't it?)

    No argument from me there. In regard to clutch life, 'YMMV' covers it perfectly! ;)
  • kat5027kat5027 Posts: 1
    I am trying to repair the horn on my 91Jeep Wrangler. I am missing several components to finish. Is there a exploded view diagram of the entire assembly with a parts list for the horn and steering column, from the steering wheel all the way into the firewall?
  • My 1993 jeep wrangler yj 4.0L has started losing power at highway speeds (60-75mph). It happens going up hill under a load, going down hill without a load and on level road without acceleration. I don't notice it at other speeds with in lower gears. It doesn't happen all the time. When the engine loses power the tach bounces and sometimes the engine knocks.
    So far I have used several different gas stations, added dry gas and fuel system cleaners. I've swapped the fuel filter. The spark plug wires are relatively new and not arching.
    Hopefully unrelated, the alternator failed and I had to replace it. I've run out of ideas and I'm looking for some ideas so I'm not arbitrarily swapping parts.
    Ay ideas?
  • i've beat the heck out of the rims that came with my '98 wrangler, i've a chance to get some nice looking alloy rims really cheap from a honda element part out deal... they've five lugs, but i can't tell for sure if they'd work or not. anyone know?
  • coherbertcoherbert Posts: 1
    I have a 1988 Jeep Wrangler. I live at 8000 feet, but bought the car at 5000 ft. It was running poorly when I got it home. I adjusted the carburetor, changed the oil, and adjusted the idle. Runs much better now, but still won't start fist thing in the morning. I have to add starter fluid every morning. Once the starter fluid is in it turns over easily and then will start, no problem, for the rest of the day. It seems as though fuel is not running through the line after sitting for several hours. What would cause this? I have heard rumors or a fuel injector on 88 Wranglers???
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