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How does gas at $4 and higher impact you?

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  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    edited September 2012
    5% on some "bonus" items (groceries or hotels, etc.), have to "sign up" quarterly. 1% on everything else. No fee. Sounds a lot like your Discover. Rarely use my other Capital One card; got it because they charge no exchange fees when we shortcut through Canada.

    Mostly I use grocery coupons here for gas and usually get 10 to 15 cents off a gallon.

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  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,650
    It does sound like discover.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    Costco issues a couple different American Express Cards that pay 3-4% on gas purchases at most gas stations. 2% on restaurants, 1% on all other purchases. I use it most since Shell quit their 5% discount.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    "Toyota and Honda also are benefiting from a shift in American car buying tastes toward smaller, lighter more fuel efficient cars. Autodata reports that small cars captured 20% of total car and light truck sales in September, up from a 15% share a year earlier.

    The move to smaller cars is happening without the sort of loud panic over gas prices that drove consumers to small cars and hybrids in 2008 (and the late 1970s.) Instead, consumers appear to be quietly factoring gasoline prices of close to $4 a gallon into their buying calculations, and reassessing just how much car they need to crawl to work on congested freeways."

    Detroit’s Joy Ride Is Over (WSJ)

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,766
    Ah WSJ, article whining about Detroit and showing what is apparently a CPO MB lot somewhere in Europe (SL280? really?)

    Although the idea is correct, I don't see many really caring about fuel yet. Maybe when pressures are finally made for the overpaid unfireable in-for-25-out-with-85 "traffic engineers" to optimize traffic flow, which must waste more gas then suburban posers in SUVs.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    Costco is now up to $4.19. Gas Buddy has San Diego average at $4.52 for RUG. I can actually buy premium and diesel cheaper than RUG in some places. Not sure what is happening. I think we have a shortage. Maybe the oil companies said screw CA politicians and are pulling out. They just signed more legislation that will increase the flow of jobs out of CA.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,842
    I think we have a shortage.

    I presume you don't watch the local news. Here is what I've heard and read:

    Exxon's refinery in Torrance shut down when it lost power Oct 1 - they are in the process of starting up again

    Phillips is scheduled to perform work at its two California refineries this month

    Chevron shut down it's pipeline to Northern CA due to high chloride in the oil.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    I don't watch TV at all. So I guess I will just drive whichever vehicle has gas until they get their act together. Shell was up another dime this morning to $4.49.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    Yeah, what a shabby dresser.... :sick:
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,205
    No money left for clothes after buying gas.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    Help yourself and the down and out. Shop at the Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. That is where I have found my best made in Hawaii Shirts. And for about 10% of original price. Be sure and launder with strong detergent as soon as you get them home. Same as with store bought cloths made in Chindia.

    You could also tell your boss you need a raise to cover the price of gas driving to work. :sick:
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,997
    At least they're showing a pic of a modestly-dressed woman filling up a Yaris, which shows how high prices impact everybody, rather than a pic of some expensively-dressed exec filling up a Hummer...

    I was in PA yesterday and stopped off to fill up on the way home. Usually gas is cheaper up there, but not this time. Where I stopped off, it was something like $3.939/4.139/4.339 for 87/89/93. I ran out to do some errand this morning and topped off at my local Crown in Maryland, and it was more like $3.59/3.799/3.99.

    Oh, and on that round-trip, I estimate my new Ram got about 19.1 mpg, which would be mostly highway, but some short-trip/local mixed in. That figure would probably make most people cringe, but I was pleasantly surprised that it did that well!
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    I have to go to a wedding next month. Scored a gray suit for $2 at the thrift. It's nice being an "average" size - don't even need to hem the pants.

    Of course the thrift shop I went to was an hour away, so I spent more on gas than the suit. But I was combining errands anyway.

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  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,722
    This is first I've read about you having a new Ram pickup. When did you get it?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,997
    Got it two weeks ago. Lessee if I can find the first post on it...

    I think this should be it.

    Ironically, as big, bulky, and heavy as this thing is, compared to most of my cars it actually represents a step UP in fuel economy! When I took it up to PA and back, I averaged about 19.1 mpg round trip, plus a bit of local driving so it wasn't pure highway.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,722
    edited October 2012
    Nice truck! One thing about a Hemi, it will always sound good.
    Pretty good mileage for a big beast. Does it have cylinder deactivation?
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,650
    Oh, and on that round-trip, I estimate my new Ram got about 19.1 mpg

    That's not bad at all considering the power and size of the truck.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,997
    Thanks! And yeah, it has cylinder deactivation. Under light-power situations, it'll go from 8 to 6-cyl. It's pretty seamless too...at least I can't feel it.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    I want this (although I understand some implementations, like BMWs, don't work too smoothly).

    "Stop-start systems can cut combined city-highway fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by 3-10 percent, and even more when they're combined with hybrid drive systems. The systems deliver their fuel economy improvements in city situations that involve lots of stop-and-go driving. And they can do it at relatively little cost to the consumer."

    Engine Stop-Start Systems Save Fuel at Low Cost

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    I hope Ford did a better job of stop start technology than GM. My 2005 GMC engine would stop when I went around a corner. Then the pause before restarting would cause wheel spin if you had the accelerator partially depressed. I hated it. Would have disabled if possible on that POC GMC Hybrid. They could save a lot more gas by getting rid of Ethanol in our fuel.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,201
    I agree. I'm leery of all these techie ideas, be it stop/start or cylinder deactivation. Seems to me that a slight computer blip and presto - a big dollar repair. As for ethanol, E-85; who asked for it, maybe ADM? Now we've got EPA wanting to cram it down our throat. Congress has already screwed up our light bulbs, now they want to control other aspects of our lives and decisions...and it seems to be both parties to boot.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    Interesting blurb in the WSJ today about the isolated California gas market.

    "California is a closed system," adds John Demopoulos, an energy analyst at Argus Media. "The whole thing functions perfectly well when everything's going to plan. But when something unexpected happens, there's no external buffer."

    Investigation into previous gasoline price spikes in California didn't find an errant hand.

    Instead, it found the proverbial invisible hand—the ordering principle of supply and demand. And given the quirks of the California market, that law appears to be working just as you would expect it to."

    California's Gas Price: Is There a Villain?

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  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    "Gasoline prices were falling before Sandy struck, and nationally, at least, they’ve continued to drop in the storm’s aftermath.

    That a storm of Sandy’s size and destruction would have such a muted impact might come as a surprise, especially given the big price spikes associated with past storms, including the 45-cent-a-gallon increase that followed Hurricane Isaac earlier this year. But several factors are working in drivers’ favor this time around.

    First and most significantly, the East Coast simply isn’t that important as a gasoline supplier. The refineries in Sandy’s path make up about 8% of U.S. refining capacity. Isaac, by contrast, idled nearly half of U.S. capacity when it hit the refinery-rich Gulf Coast.

    Damage also appears to have been minor."

    Sandy Won’t Cause Pain at the Pump (WSJ)

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    So we should direct all future Hurricanes to the East Coast and protect the refineries and offshore oil platforms in the Gulf. :shades:
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,764
    edited October 2012
    Exactly; meanwhile letting the mangrove swamps retake the Louisiana/Texas coastlines again would help dissipate a lot of the storm energy before it hits places like Port Arthur. Chevron has been working to restore a bunch of wetlands there.

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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,499
    Well, that's a relief! Considering that the refinery in my back yard raises prices for any excuse conceivable, despite the fact that exactly zero of them have any impact on prices here (Alaska does not export refined petroleum products), I'm glad to hear that the news media will not support an increase in fuel prices... maybe, just maybe, that means the local prices won't go up again. :sick:
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,017
    That is pretty crazy. You got all the oil and a refinery, with very little gas tax and Alaska still has high priced gas. Whatsupwithat???
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,499
    Monopoly in a closed market. They can charge whatever price they want up to the point where it would be profitable for another company to import refined fuel from outside, and the only backlash is people jacking their jaws.
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