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How does gas at $4 and higher impact you?

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    Filled the Sequoia first time since October. Costco fill price in 10/17/12 $4.39, price at Costco today $3.93. It spends most of the time in the garage with the old LS400.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    "SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Gasoline prices at the pump have climbed every day for the past 21 days — and they’re not going to let up anytime soon.

    On Thursday, the average U.S. price for a gallon of regular gasoline stood at $3.555, making it the most expensive average ever for that day and the highest level since Oct. 26 of last year, according to AAA...."
  • Filled the Sequoia first time since October

    Do you put Stabil in the tank? I've heard the ethanol goes bad in about 6 weeks.

    That could ruin your day...
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    I don't even watch it anymore. Nothing I can do about it, and I'm going to fill anyway, so no sense in getting worked up over it. :sick:
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    I have not put any additives. I did just put 20 gallons in a 25 gallon tank. So most is fresh. It does sit a lot so I may put some in. I hate our CA crap gas anyway. I will be making my trips to the desert very soon so it will get some running time.
  • I have an F250 gasser I use as a "farm truck", and it only sees about 5-700 miles a year.

    Fortunately, I can get 100% gas up here for that vehicle, so it lasts longer.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    I think the only non ethanol gas you can buy is at the airport for small planes. Maybe down at the harbor as well. The sooner I get rid of our gas vehicles and go to diesel the better.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,010
    There's some near me; premium only but ethanol free. Not cheap though. Pure-gas.org has a list.

    There's only 5 "pure gas" stations listed for California.

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    You got me curious so I tracked those five down up in Northern CA. The Northern Lights Energy are the distributors for Union 76 gas. The addresses are their tank farms. Renner seems to be a regional brand. Alaska is the only Free state in the Union. All stations sell REAL gas untainted with alcohol.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,010
    edited February 2013
    Hard to believe that the stations in Anchorage and Fairbanks don't have it for carbon monoxide reduction purposes. Surely they still aren't using MTBE? Is there a "cold start" exemption? Ah, sounds like Frank Murkowski may have killed it.

    Fairbanks gets that nasty ice fog and they don't call the big city Los Anchorage for nothing. The state is even going after wood burners in Fairbanks. Where's Xwes?

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    Probably has to do with the high cost of shipping Ethanol to the state. Fairbanks does get pretty bad in the Winter with all the cars running. I never noticed it bad in Anchorage. Of course I lived at the top of Rabbit Creek Rd. most of the time. And then way up the Eagle River valley for only a couple years. MTBE was only a problem when stored in underground tanks if memory serves. It got into the ground water and killed everyone in the vicinity. :shades:
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,010
    Gee, too bad all the Delta barley farms went bust; they could have switched to corn and supplied it locally. :shades:

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    season is too short for corn. That is why they grew barley. You can make alcohol from barley. But what a waste putting it in your gas tank. :blush:
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,010
    The $100 million joke on the taxpayer was that you couldn't grow barley either. Not one of Jay Hammond's better ideas.

    The latest blizzard (Nemo?) is bound to make gas prices jump even more. I knew I should have gassed up the other day.

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    All ours are full. Not much chance of a blizzard. Though we are getting hail as I am typing. Snow just 1000 feet higher than I am. Our gas is always high because everything in CA is more expensive. Except oranges and avocados.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    edited February 2013
    Actually, you can grow barley, and pretty well at that, but the problem back in the 1980's is that they hadn't developed a strain of barley that was suited to the northern climate. Now, we have such a variety (Sunshine Barley), developed right here at UAF.

    As with corn, it isn't that barley couldn't be grown here, it's that it couldn't be grown reliably from year to year. An additional issue with Delta is that the bison herds, which are of the plains variety, love open areas (as opposed to forest, which is what is native to the Delta area) and they love barley. So, you can see where this is going.... :P

    Be that as it may, it would be a complete travesty to use any crop harvested in this state for something as inefficient as ethanol production. The growing season is short and food is a precious commodity.

    We get poor enough fuel economy in the winter as it is, the last thing we need is another hit by including ethanol in the fuel. The "smog" we see here in the winter months is primarily due to the temperature inversions, which can be quite severe at times, holding all of the emissions down low to the ground. The vast majority of the contributing emissions are from space heating devices (boilers, stoves, etc). Automobiles used to be a prime source, but emissions from them are vastly cleaner than even as recent as fifteen years ago.

    Fairbanks even ended its emissions testing program a few years ago, despite the ongoing winter air quality concerns.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    Still a lot of people heating with wood and oil I would imagine. That is not the cleanest form of heat. With our atrocious propane price here I use a lot of wood. Of course that is not cheap this time of year. I bought in the Summer at about half the current going price.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Shoot, if I lived in that area, I'm not sure I would even heat!

    Yes, there's a lot of wood burning. Fortunately, the price of oil has encouraged many (most?) folks to keep their heating appliances in top shape, so oil particulates are pretty low. Wood burners are probably the biggest contributor to the air quality problem because it is so easy to burn wood inefficiently, and it is still inexpensive enough that many folks aren't willing to put in the extra up-front investment to increase the burn quality. The same can be said for coal, I suppose, but there is very little coal use here except in the power plants, which are equipped for their fuel source.

    We have limited access to gaseous fuels like propane or natural gas, and both are very expensive. There is some use, but it isn't wide spread outside of the city of Fairbanks.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    I remember the propane bills in Eagle River during the winter. Easy $500 per month to heat our big log home. I use a high end Avalon insert in my fireplace here. It is pretty efficient and sealed to keep the particulates out of the house. I would imagine you have hot water baseboard heat. Which is so much better than our forced air furnaces. We have needed heat here since November. At noon today it is 45 degrees at my house. A full 20 degrees below normal. Of course the liars at the NWS will post their in the sun figures. Our home is well insulated which helps. We have used the heat more this year than AC. I think we turned on the AC maybe 10 days all summer long. Which was the coldest July ever recorded.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    edited February 2013
    That's good for the summer... bad for the winter!

    I installed an in-floor hydronic system rather than using hydronic baseboards, but it's the same idea... just better executed. ;)

    I love it! I can't believe it took me eight years to get it hooked up, dealing with cold floors every winter. Next time, the heating system is the first thing I finish. Heck, I don't even need plumbing or electric first. Give me that in-floor heat! We start heating around the beginning to middle of September, whenever the temperature in the house drops under 56F during the day. Night-time outdoor temperatures are generally with 5 degrees of freezing (+ OR -) by then. From there, we heat until May 1, at which point I shut the system down and the family just has to deal with cold spells if the outdoor weather doesn't cooperate.

    Last year was my highest consumption winter, the first after which we had the boiler hydronic system installed for a full winter, and we used ~750 gallons of #1 heating oil (for 2400 square feet, which is really good this far north). This winter, based on current consumption, I expect to come in close to 600. We had a guy come out in late October and re-tune the unit, which has made an impressive difference.

    I was hoping we would use ~400 a year when I first built the house, which would give us 2.5 years from our 1,000 gallon tank, but that just wasn't realistic for the size of the space. I'd have to dump a mint into additional insulation to get us close to that, and I just don't think it's worth the effort or the money.
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