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Ford Explorer Mercury Mountaineer 2005 and earlier

18384868889108

Comments

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,915
    i would leave the gps unit on, then check it about an hour later. i think you will have your answer.
  • marsha7marsha7 Posts: 3,676
    green pilot light is on, at least you know that the line is live with voltage...now, if I put a radio on the wire, but the radio is off, then the line is live, but the radio is off, so no power drain (altho the pilot light itself is a tiny drain on the battery...if left like that in an airport for six weeks, you could return to a dead battery)

    I would unplug the cord, or stick it into a power outlet that is connected to the ignition switch, rather than a live plug 24/7...
  • fsmmcsifsmmcsi Posts: 792
    Teh always live cigarette lighter (power point) is one of the best features of Ford vehicles. I want it that way. For example,I want my cell phone to charge when the car is off, not just when it is on.

    The tiny amount of power going to the turned-off GPS unit would be an issue only if you had the car parked for a long time.
  • bjohnrinibjohnrini Posts: 3
    >>The tiny amount of power going to the turned-off GPS unit would be an issue only if you had the car parked for a long time.

    And what exactly is considered a long time?

    >>I would unplug the cord, or stick it into a power outlet that is connected to the ignition switch, rather than a live plug 24/7...

    How would I go about connecting it to the ignition switch?

    Thanks
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    Bought a 2003 XLT last night with 26k miles :) Salesman bumped the certified warranty to cover 55 more components and I kicked in another $320 to cover 29 more like power window regulators etc. It is a V6 with sunroof, rear air, adjustable pedals, skipped the 3rd row. I think I got a good deal -- $19,800 before tax and title.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    and a good decision too. On the 03, you get a little known added bonus also - your spare is mounted on a matching Alloy wheel - not a black steel wheel, allowing you to integrate your spare into the tire rotation. Only the 03's have that.
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    Thanks -- did not know that! Haven't finished going through the owner's manual yet. In the end, I could not find an '04 that wasn't a rental with the options I wanted. So even though I wanted the extra secuirty features from 2004, I went with the '03.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,915
    i didn't know if the power point shut off after time, like the interior and puddle lights lights, etc...
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    It doesn't, but unless you have a refrigerator plugged into it, it won't kill your battery. Charging a phone or something takes no power from a battery of that size.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    Not to throw rain on your parade, but you paid 20 grand for a 3 year old vehicle. A BRAND NEW XLT can be had for $27,000 or so after all the rebates. Although that's about 35% more cash upfront, the miles-per-car would have been cheaper on the brand new vehicle.
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    I had no desire to spend an extra 8k after sales tax just to say I have a brand new car that will rapidly depreciate soon as I drive it off the lot. Go try to make someone else feel bad -- I'm happy with my choice.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,915
    i have 45k on my '02. going to replace the goodyear ap tires next week. they are rated for 45k miles, i think. getting close to the wear bars and i have some long family trips planned over the next few months. the brakes still seem fine, so all i have paid for is the regular maintenance stuff. i did have the tranny flushed at 30k and will have it done again at 60k.
  • marsha7marsha7 Posts: 3,676
    Some cars now have more than one powerpoint outlet...the cig lighter and one other...often one may be live 24/7, and the other only live when ignition is on...I believe my 2000 Sable or my 2000 Intrepid had that feature, the cig lighter was disabled when ignition turned off, so I could charge my cell phone when driving, but not when parked and off...I liked it that way...
  • fsmmcsifsmmcsi Posts: 792
    Discount Tire has the new Goodyear Fortera in size 245/70-16 for $540 per set of four, with a $540 rebate, for a total of $490. They also have that tire in the new Limited size - 245/65-17, and I think it is the tire my new Explorer will have.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    I wasn't trying to make you feel bad just to irritate you. But I was pointing out that
    you way overpaid for a 3 year old car in the long run. If you keep your 3 year old vehicle for another 3 years then buy yet another 3 year old vehicle, you will have spent MORE than if you just bought the brand new vehicle at today's rock bottom price of $27,000 (about $3000 less than they were selling for 3 years ago new, by the way).

    The 8 grand you think you "saved" was merely deferred and was being penny wise/pound foolish. Now if you could have bought the XLT for $16,000 or even $17,000.....
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    Regardless, I did not have another 8 grand to spend for a brand new car! I intend to keep this one for more than 3 years.

    A certified used car with the features I got was valued at 19,600 by Edmunds, so I beg to differ about way overpaying...

    Maybe you should have sent me a check for that 8k first and I would have bought the 2005.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    Edmunds is high. It always has been. I looked at Kelley Blue Book, (KBB.com) which has shown to be more reflective of the real world, and it's about $2 grand less. And even if you had bought for the much smarter Kelley price, the REAL VALUE still isn't there at today's fire-sale new vehicle prices (especially for a gas hog like Explorer...not a comment on Explorer...I have a Mountaineer...just a comment that these gas hogs can be bought NEW for firesale prices).

    Kelley shows that the dealer probably bought that vehicle for about $13000. He cleaned up, man! So MUCH MUCH MUCH more of your dollar went into dealer profit (to "instant depreciation heaven") than the 3% holdback plus a few hundred above the true rebate-included invoice you would ahve paid for a new vehicle.

    Let me put it another way. Let's say you keep your 26K mi vehicle until it hits 100,000 miles total. Or you could have bought a new vehicle and kept IT for 100,000 miles total. In this case, the new vehicle would have cost less per mile to operate. Buying a 2-3 year old vehicle, ESPECIALLY an American vehicle, is generally an EXCELLENT way to reduce that cost per mile. But in your case, you so way overpaid that you blew that advantage. Not to mention the uncertainty that comes with buying a used vehicle.

    You would have been better off financing the new vehicle for a longer period of time...it would have lasted that much longer anyway....than doing what you did. Again, the dealer paid about $13,000 and you way way way overpaid, Edmunds or not.

    Sure, you avoided $8K additional INITIAL OUTLAY, but to do that you accepted a reduction in the value of your used vehicle over new. Sort of like buying half a gallon of gas for $1.75 when a full gallon is $2.25. You "saved" 50 cents....NOT!
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    Interesting that the starting point at KBB for my zip code, mileage and options on the one I bought is $22,085. So to say my deal of $19,800 is way way too much seems flawed.

    Then again, you must be the expert so KBB.com and Edmunds.com are wrong.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    My KBB numbers are way lower than what you are suggesting. And perhaps KBB and Edmunds used vehicle prices don't yet reflect the huge firesale that they are now having on new vehicles. Again, 20 grand is too much to spend for a 3 year old vehicle when a brand new one can be had for 27. It's just that simple.
  • jcat707jcat707 Posts: 168
    As long as he is happy with the price he paid and happy with the vehicle itself, then that's the most important thing. :)
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    His happiness isn't the issue. The issue is that this is an internet bulletin board and we all learn from others. In this case, we can learn that the new vehicle was the better value based on his used vehicle deal.
  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    Unless you have secret KBB data, then you're just wrong. SIMPLE AS THAT. Plug in the features, miles, certification and my zip and you'll see what a dealer would ask for the explorer.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    Perhaps the certification is the difference. But, truthfully, it just adds bigtime to the price. A new vehicle gets the full 3/36 without addtional certification costs. You're better off WITH the certification than without, but the better value here STILL is the new vehicle.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,571
    Edmunds started out catering to consumers; Kelley started out as a dealer service. Which Kelley book do you mean - the consumer one or the subscription one that only dealers can get?

    What is the "Kelley Blue Book" Price?

    For daily auction and car lot trends on particular vehicles, check out the posts over in Real-World Trade-In Values.

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • midas72midas72 Posts: 18
    I still got part of the original warranty then an upgraded extended warranty after that. When you add in sunroof, rear air, XLT package, and power seat/pedals those all increase the price, not to mention small adjustment for less than average miles. Being a leased vehicle, I feel more comfortable buying it used and certified rather than an '04 or '05 that was a fleet/rental car.

    Be thankful you can not think twice about spending an extra 7-8k for a new car. I'd rather get one slightly used and put the rest of my money to work.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    Listen, I hear you that $7000-$8000 is a lot of money. I don't disagree that a 2-3 year old vehicle is generally the best way to buy a car...and then keep it until the wheels fall off or until unreliability cramps your lifestyle.

    Did you finance or pay cash?
  • fsmmcsifsmmcsi Posts: 792
    Never finance or lease a depreciating thing such as a car. If you can't pay cash, don't buy the thing. You will never regret paying cash, buy may very regret financing. Remember, the banks and finance companies are selling something, and that something is high interest and the uncertainty or even misery which goes with having a loan obligation on a car, appliance, or other depreciating stuff.
  • moeharrimoeharri Posts: 108
    You do realize that most people don't have the kind of cash up front to buy almost any car, much less a $30k car, right??
  • fsmmcsifsmmcsi Posts: 792
    If they do not have the cash, then they should not buy - no exceptions. They can make do with an old car, buy a less expensive used car, ride public transit, or ride with firends or associates. They key is to get off of the debt bandwagon. Once you start buying cars with cash, you probably will never again finance one.

    Once my 2006 Explorer comes in, somebody will find an excellent deal on my 2002 Mountaineer. I doubt it will sell for more than $10,000 in the current market, yet it should give many more years of good service (I would certainly keep it, save for the ride being rougher than I am willing to continue to tolerate for the 31,000 plus miles I drive every year).

    As another example, we sold our 1994 Thunderbird LX V8 in 2003 for $3,000. It had gone 120,000 miles, but looked and ran great. The buyer was a young relative of someone we knew through our work. He could not believe the excellent condition, and he was wisely starting his adult life without developing a dependency on consumer debt (I was not so smart). There are plenty of six to ten year old cars available for a few thousand dollars, and unless you drive far more than average annual distances, such a car should give several more years of good service.

    Once you get off of the consumer debt addiction and build up your income and savings, you will be able to buy brand new cars with cash.
  • moeharrimoeharri Posts: 108
    If they don't have the cash, do not buy? I think you are way off. Even a $10k car is hard to save up for for many families, unless you have a really good job and perhaps no house payment, children, etc. Vehicle dependability is very important to many people (especially me) and they are afraid of the unknown with a used car (warranties are nice, but it costs more money and still requires lots of time for frequent repairs). Also, most of the cities around me have no public transit, many people commute 35 minutes each way, etc. In a rosey world perhaps people would buy with cash, but there is nothing wrong with financing (especially at 0%) if you can afford the payments and loan length. It is a great way to lower your payments and have your money do some work for you since you'll obviously make more with it in the bank/stock/etc than having paid for the vehicle outright.

    There are many reasons why a 2002 Ford/Mercury won't sell for much money: it's a gas guzzler, it's American (Ford or GM in the same boat), crazy deals by dealers for new vehicles now to catch up to Toyota/Honda, etc. While all cars depreciate, Japanese (and perhaps German, etc) do so much more slowly, which is quite nice for buyers of new vehicles.

    I just don't see how you can think people can save up thousands of dollars and drive "junkers" until they have enough to buy a new vehicle. Owning a new vehicle shouldn't just be for upper class people, it should also be for hard working lower/middle class people too.

    To get back on topic, we have a 2003 Explorer which we bought new (has 19k miles now) which we will for sure be getting rid of prior to our factory warranty running out (due to dealer and Ford issues/run a rounds). I imagined that spending $30ish thousand dollars on a vehicle "entitled" us to some decent service and to be treated like a human being--guess again. Someone will get a good "deal" from us when we sell/trade, but we'll be happy to give them the good "deal" as we are running, not walking, into Toyota's arms.
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