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Jeep Grand Cherokee Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • jef98zjjef98zj Posts: 4
    First, the brake rotors.... most original equipment (OEM) brake rotors are garbage; if you get 25,000 miles on them, then you are doing well. Have them replaced with a better quality aftermarket rotor, and the problems are gone. I bought Stillen (cross-drilled) rotors and Performance Friction pads for the front of my 1998, and the improvement is amazing. Even the local NAPA store has decent replacement rotors for a reasonable price (less than the Stillens, but you always get what you pay for) that should last at least twice as long as the OEM's.

    Second, the "misfire" problem on the 1997 sounds like what I had with my (former) 1996 - the cause turned out to be bad (weak) valve springs. This is a known problem in the pre-1997 (and some early 1997) Jeeps with the 4.0-liter engine. Mine went bad at 60,000 miles, so no warranty coverage. New valve springs went in (at the dealer - see below) and it ran better than new.

    Next, the various transmission problems are covered by a few Technical Service Bulletins issued by Chrysler (these are not necessarily "recall" items, nor should they be). Most of the glitches were ironed out by the mid-2000 production year. Most 2001's that I know of are running along without problems of any kind, and the 2002's are even better.

    The Jeeps are the most capable off-road vehicle in their class (under $60,000), but (as with most such vehicles) there have been a few problems along the way, all of which can be fixed by the right dealership or by doing it yourself; I do about half of my Jeep work myself. The only dealer that I do business with (Patrick - Rochester, NY / www.patrickautodeals.com) is almost 100 miles away, but well worth the trip. Their service people are top shelf, and they do it right the first time. Their sales people are not obnoxious, either.
  • jgcv84x4jgcv84x4 Posts: 1
    I've recently purchased a '93 Jeep Grand Cherokee with the 5.2 Liter V-8 and Quadratrac 4WD. Although I love the thing and have never had a problem with it, the mileage is killing me. I know that I can't expect much from it with the V-8 and 4x4, but I'd like to get all that I can. Most of my driving is town driving, and all I'm getting is 11.5 mpg. Is there any cheap way found to improve this problem. Please email help to jgcv84x4@yahoo.com. It will be appreciated.
  • ez2bemeez2beme Posts: 5
    The lease on my 99 JGC ltd. will be up in a few months,and although this vehicle is great off road and the V8 is an absolute rocket,the reliability and quality issues have really thrown a wet blanket on my first Jeep experience. I will be giving my next vehicle business to a company that respects its customers enough not to knowingly put untested,unsafe products on sale.
  • dennis81dennis81 Posts: 7
    I just took a 1,000 mile trip to Maine in my 2000 JGC with almost 25,000 miles, and noticed the steering wheel shimmy when applying the brakes from about 50 mph. I take it that this is the rotor problem that so many others have experienced, and I guess I'm fortunate to have gotten as many miles out of the originals as I have. I want to replace them with better than OEM. I've read several posts that recommend Stillen. Stillen's website has the front cross-drilled rotors and pads for $379. Is this the best I can do for these? And should I also do the rears at the same time?

    And has anyone else experienced a screeching sound from the power door lock mechanism?

    BTW, the mileage on my I-6 sucks big time (16-17 at best). V8's do better than I do, with more power.
  • tomallytomally Posts: 3
    I have a 1999 JGC I bought in California. I currently live in Colorado and am experienceing a major ventilation problem.
    Whenever I drive up-hill, the air (either hot/cold) goes from blowing out the vents to blowing out the defroster vents. Everytime I take the vehicle in, I tell the dealer to fix it, still a problem. You freeze in the winter and sweat during the summer.
    The other problem is on the passenger side. Air comes through the floorboard and the passenger literally freezes (in the winter).
    One other problem is the annoying loud leaking air coming through the windows. Is there a fix for this? The dealer told me it was the rack on top of the vehicle making this noise, do they think I really believe that? Not.
    I was wondering if anyone else is experiencing any of these problems. If so, please let me know if there is a fix, my warranty is almost up and I can't see owning a vehicle with this problem.
  • tasillotasillo Posts: 51
    On my firt post 2/19 I had some complaints, but they were relatively minor on my '00 GCL V-8 QuadraDrive. However a few day's later I left the office and discovered the ignition key would not turn. No amount of jiggling, in/out, etc would work. Finally forced the issue and it turned, but broke the lock cylinder. Decided it was time for other items so to the Jeep dealer it went (Nalley in Roswell, GA). Other complaints included long crank times, lots of gear roar between 50-70 mph and harsh downshifts and gear engagement on part-throttle acceleration.

    Dealer was great, they replaced the ignition, dropped the fuel tank and replaced the quad-ring set on the fuel system, replaced both F&R driveshafts, reprogrammed the transmission and engine control computers and road tested the truck. Two days later and it is 100% better! They even washed and dried the car!

    I'm happy to have the Jeep running as it should but wary of it getting out of warranty. The choice is either to take a bath and get rid of it before the 36k mark and warranty expiration or ante up $1500 for the peace of mind of extended warranty.

    By the way, from an off-road perspective, the Jeep is great, but my Tahoe, Suburban and Expedition all went the same places with fewer problems and headaches.
  • When the warranty was up i ponyed up the $1,600 to cover me until 90K miles. Just wanted the peace of mind. I have not had any major problems but reading this board gave me goose bumps and am glad i purchased the EW just in case.
  • bridges6bridges6 Posts: 1
    I'm thinking about getting a GC LAredo and wanted to know opninions about it. It handles well City and Hwy. Dealer wants 7500 with 126000 miles. This will be my 1st SUV and want to get a good one that will last several years. Opinions are welcomed. I can be emailed at bridgeh@med.unc.edu. I'm also thinking about a 92 Explorer but it has some minor problems.
  • jam1000jam1000 Posts: 182
    I had a 94 JGC Laredo (5.2 V8; Quadra-Trac) and loved it. You're right about the handling; also was incredibly good in rain, snow and other slippery conditions. I'm sorry I got rid of it, and will probably get a 2002 pretty soon. Big rap on the JGCs of that (or any other) vintage is that many people feel that the transmission gives out in the 75-90K mile range, so make sure that's well-vetted.

    You might also want to check some of the online services (edmunds tmv, kbb, nadaguides, blackbook on cars.com) regarding the selling price. 7500 for an 8 (soon to be 9) yo vehicle with 126K miles seems steep.
  • tomallytomally Posts: 3
    I also have a problem with the keyless entry. Sometimes I press the unlock button and nothing happens. I have to press the lock key and the the unlock key numerous times waiting for the jeep to unlock. This has happened since the beginning of time for my 99 JGC. Any solutions? I haven't seen any posted.
  • tomallytomally Posts: 3
    The dealership reset the computer on my JGC and I haven't had a problem since.
  • fishrxmanfishrxman Posts: 31
    Tomally:I had the same problem with my 2001 JGC. Keyless entry wouldn't work when temp dropped below freezing. Remotes were new, so it wasn't due to a low battery. The problem occurred with BOTH remotes, which ruled out defective remote controls. The dealer replaced the driver's side door handle which contained the computer for the remote keyless entry. Then, both remotes had to be reprogrammed. I've noticed on my 2002 JGC that I need to be closer to it for the remote to work properly during really cold weather (below 0'F). I also had trouble with the seat and side mirror changing positions. THAT problem wasn't resolved before I traded my 2001 for a 2002. Hope this helps.
  • I just went to the dealer wednesday about the keyless entry as it was not unlocking with one push. They came out reset the computer on the 98 JGC and poof everthing works like new and no charge for the service. It took about 15 minutes from the time i pulled into service until I pulled out, nice and face with a happy ending, lol...
  • I had to go home and look at my service report on this one - I had the same issue with the air/heat spontaneously coming out of the wrong vents, however it had nothing to do with going uphill or not. On my service report, it said that they "relocated the check valve". And that fixed it, it hasn't happened since. Good luck. I am looking to trade my JGC in this weekend. I am done with all of these problems.
  • nikiblue1nikiblue1 Posts: 44
    Hello icemanmax,
    I have gotten rid of my 2000 JGC limited v8, qd almost a year ago. Bit I often turn back to this discussion group to see if DC have improved their reliability. I have gone through the arbitration. It is a total waste of time. It took three month to get a final answer from DC--they did not want to buy back my Jeep. It took little over three weeks with a lawyer, and the jeep was bought back. Do not waste your time with arbitration. It is a process that will get your hopes up, waste your time, and at the end very few people get satisfactory results. I still see 2002 JGC have the same problems: memory settings, alarm control problems, gear whine, starting problems, rotor problems, etc. Great vehicle if you don't mind monthly dealer visits and costly repairs down the line.
  • kkuligkkulig Posts: 150
    There is no law in your state that's more consumer-oriented than your state lemon law. Period. Go to www.autopedia.com, read it and learn how to use it to your advantage. You don't need a lawyer.

    DC doesn't determine whether your vehicle qualifies as a lemon. Your state does. DC has to abide by your state law. Don't let them BS or intimidate you. Sure, they'll do that to you. What do they have to lose? What does that cost them? 90% of the people they do this to go away without a whimper or fight. Mighty successful tactics, huh?

    I'll bet a month's pay right now that if you pursue your state lemon law against them, and they see you're absolutely serious about this, they'll eventually settle and it'll never see the inside of a courtroom. You don't need a lawyer to do this either.

    Yes, most state laws require that you go through DC's arbitration program first before you can use the lemon law. The arbitrator's decision is only binding on DC, not you. If you don't like the decision, then you can use the lemon law.

    Before you go into arbitration, check with your state to see if DC's arbitration program is certified for use in your state. If it's not, you don't have to waste your time with it. WI, FL and CT are three states that come to mind that do not certify DC's program. There may be others that don't. Check on this.

    Be aware that DC uses the National Center for Dispute Settlement (NCDS) based in TX. Also be aware that DC pays NCDS to handle arbitration as well as vehicle buyback and replacement. Yes, they are very arrogant people to deal with.

    Part of the pay incentive NCDS has is to deny the majority of claims made against DC's vehicles. The more money they save DC from having to pay out in settlements, the more money that goes into NCDS's pocketbook. Think about that... do you really feel that you are getting fair, unbiased arbitration when this is how NCDS gets payed? They work for DC, not you.

    Again, you have a very powerful law to back you up. Learn it, use it like I did and win. For an investment of a couple hours of your time to assemble copies of your repair orders outlining the problems, write the lemon notification letter to DC and spent $2.76 to send it by certified mail, what do you possibly have to lose? It worked perfectly for me and it should for you too.

    Venting about it here and doing nothing more doesn't get the vehicle fixed or get you out from underneath it. And the problem sure isn't going to go away on its own, now is it?

    Good luck to all of you!
  • anetmcanetmc Posts: 1
    My 93 JGC Ltd. has had paint chipping off the hood and roof. I wrote Chrysler several times with regards to the paint chipping and flaking and they refuse to take responsibility for improper paint application. I've noticed quite a few 93' jeeps on the road with the same problem. Any one out there with the same problem? Possible class action against Chrysler for a new paint job?
  • envoy2002envoy2002 Posts: 26
    This is my first (and probably only) post to this group. I had a '98 JGC Limited and traded it in for a 2000 JGC Limited on July 7, 2000. When backing out of the dealership (15 miles on the odometer), my first clue about poor quality occurred when the steering wheel shuddered and made a "honking" noise when turning. 33,000 (city) miles later, the front and rear drive shafts have each been replaced twice, the steering column and components have been replaced 4 times (only after TSB came out), climate control failure 1x replaced, and front bearings 3 times rplaced (most recent time was only 6,000 miles since the prior replacement)-- how the bearings disintegrate in an enclosed apparatus baffles me -- and axel whine repair performed. Fortunately service department replaced my rotors 3x under warranty (interestingly, the service manager told me --"chrysler knows they use low quality rotors, but won't do anything about it)Well, I said all that to say this: Chrysler is buying back my vehicle! Moral of this post is to let you all know that the arbritration process works! In a matter of 2 weeks the National Center for Dispute Settlement contacted me numerous times, set up an arbritration date, notified Chrysler in Detroit, and Chrysler called me and made me an offer. Mind you, this was going to be arbritration, not a "lemon law" suit. So, as it stands, they offered me a clean close out (turn in the keys and walk away) or, the deal I took was the "mathematical" deal where Chrysler refunds me every penny I paid (that's 19 months of payments, my down payment, and bug deflector shield)minus a "usage fee" which is the mileage driven times a certain factor and any rebate used when getting the vehicle. The usage fee pretty much offset my payments (I'll actually get $100 back there) but I get my $3000 down payment back, too. I would have gone for another JGC, as I really like the looks, style, and ride, but can't tolerate anymore of it's inherrent problems. So, I am now in a 2002 Envoy SLT. The ride is much smoother and more technology is inside the cabin, but it doesn't do the 0 to 60 mph in 6.7 seconds like the Jeep! I guess I can live with a 1 second slower engine knowing (and hoping) it spends more time in my garage than the service garage. Good luck to all, and hope this post lets you know arbritration works. By the way..it worked for my friend who got out of his 1999 JGC Limited, too.
  • 51willys51willys Posts: 2
    I have a apparently one of the few very dependable JGC's with one problem. At highway cruising speeds between 65 and 75 mph and greater, a strong vibration occures and is felt in the floor, seats and steering wheel. The vibration only occures under load i.e. on an uphill grade, stops when coasting or if I let off on accelerator. This is a 4x4, 78,000 miles but started around 60,000 miles. Dealer thought a front end rebuild would cure it (determined w/o removing front diff. cover so I passed).

    Any similar problem and solution?
  • kkuligkkulig Posts: 150
    First of all... run, don't walk away from any mechanic who tells you you need to rebuild a differential without even taking the cover off for inspection. Your instincts are probably correct here.

    Yes, the dealers have been rebuilding quite a few differentials on the 99-00's. This was due more to grinding and howling noises than vibration problems. At the very least, ask them to back up their claim with a TSB instead of a WAG.

    You have a classic harmonic vibration problem. Especially when you don't notice a vibration at any time other than in a specific speed range (in your case, between 65-75mph). Unfortunately, alot of repairs are made by trial and error. Before tearing apart and rebuilding the front differential, there are some simpler things you can have checked first...

    The place to start would be to have someone thoroughly check all U-joints on both drive shafts. Have them pay particular attention to the U-joint mounting clamps to ensure that they are holding the U-joints in proper position in the differential yokes. Even a slight shift that wouldn't be noticed on cursory inspection can create an unbelievable amont of vibration. This is not easy to spot and you really have to be looking for this. It's as important as examining the U-joint itself.

    DC did have a TSB for this on the 98-99's and it wouldn't surprise me if that problem got carried into at least the early 00 model year. Have them examine the drive shafts at this time also. Sometimes, simply unbolting the drive shaft from the differential yoke, rotating it 180 degrees and bolting it back up will cure a problem like this.

    If you can eliminate drive shafts and U-joints as the problem, the next thing to look at would be your tires. You didn't state how many miles you have on them. Even a fairly new tire can go bad. You may have one or more tires that have had a belt shift and become out of round. Start with having them rebalanced by a competent mechanic and even having them rotated. If the dealer has some other mounted tires they can swap with yours and test drive, that's one really quick way to rule out a tire problem.

    I had your exact same problem on a 98 JGC. Same conditions made it appear and disappear, and it was in the exact speed range as yours. The vibration was so bad on mine, it felt like the vehicle was going to shake itself apart. Even though my dealer tried every trick in the book, they weren't able to track the problem down. My 98 went back under the lemon law.

    I'm currently driving a 99 JGC. Recently, I had the tires rotated. From the day I had that done, I'm now experiencing some serious vibration on deceleration from 55 to 45mph. Kind of the reverse of your problem. It only occurs in that speed range when coasting. If I stop decelerating (any application of power) it instantly disappears. In my case, what else could it be other than a 43K mile bad tire? So don't rule out your tires.

    During the above time, I did find out that Jeep had several drivetrain noise and vibration problems as part of my dealer's attempt to locate and fix the problem on my 98. They have TSB's for the rear U-joint mounting brackets, the rear differential yoke/pinion shaft, and bad slip joints in their drive shafts. These problems weren't just on the old 98 body style, they were present on the new 99's and carried over at least part way into the 00 model year. Just go back and read some of the older posts... you'll see what I mean.
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