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Toyota Matrix

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Comments

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    that is 400 pounds heavier than the corolla is the AWD. And the AWD is adding about 175 pounds over the regular model.

    The corolla's tires are chosen for cheapness, smoothness, and comfortable ride, and are also smaller than the Matrix's tires, all of which are the reasons why they make more noise in the Matrix (believe me, the huge handling improvement over corolla is worth every decibel). Also, the Matrix is higher with a more vertical rear end and will therefore have more wind noise, all other things being equal.

    Just to elaborate a little on #2453! :-)

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • deg856deg856 Posts: 120
    I’ve had my XR auto FWD for about 3 weeks and 600 miles. It’s great in every way except one significant problem for me – driving position. The steering wheel is too far away for me (6’ w/ 32” inseam), which makes driving uncomfortable. I haven’t had much trouble with getting comfortable in 23 years of driving of many different cars, trucks, vans, etc., of all sizes, domestic or foreign, except with the current CR-V during a test drive, and now the Matrix. It’s got to have something to do with the up-right, space-efficient packaging of these cars. I just called two different dealers and asked if the steering column could be extended somehow to bring the steering wheel closer. They basically said “NO WAY” due to safety/liability issues.

    A relatively minor gripe: the power steering feels a little heavy, slow and numb.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    This car is ill-suited to long-legged folk.
  • I'd like advice from the experienced crowd on replacing the "summer" Continental tires that came on the Matrix XR. I live in the SW where it rains about five times a year - however - there are snowy mountains nearby I'd like to drive to in the winter and I have read that the summer tires are not good on wet pavement.
    Also, is there an after market spoiler made that can be mounted on the rear roof area to decrease high speed drafting? I noticed the car is affected by taller vehicles when passing at highway speeds.
    Thanks.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    I wasn't aware the Matrix came with summer tires. My XRS was m + s (all-season) tires. I had REAL summer tires on my Miata and they were fine in the rain and terrific on dry pavement. If I planned on driving in the snow often, I'd probably buy winter tires. Here in Missouri, we just had one of the worst winters for awhile and I got around OK in the wide no-season tires on my XRS.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    does come with all-season m+s radials - that is what the Continental ContiTouringContacts are that maverick is referring to.

    I would say to anyone planning to drive to the snow all winter long to get real winter tires and swap them for the season when the time comes. However, for a couple of snow trips a year, just buy some chains!

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • deg856deg856 Posts: 120
    On passenger cars are more for style than function. It would hardly have any effect on reducing cross-wind sensitivity from a passing vehicle.
  • deg856deg856 Posts: 120
    XR auto FWD. 756 mi total. 395.7 mi on last tank (could have gone another 30-40 mi; the gas needle wasn't all the way down). 12.284 gal fill up. -> 32.2 mpg. Very good mpg for a car with this much interior space, and pretty cool to have a 400+ mi range between fill-ups.

    This was mostly from a 36 mi round trip daily commute between San Jose and Fremont, CA, with about 1/4 local and 3/4 freeway (1/3 stop and go with the rest cruising). Still under the break in period so I drove very gently. Kept it around 2000 rpm during acceleration if I could help it and never over 2500 rpm. Max speed on freeway kept under 60 mph.
  • tylertyler Posts: 1
    I just bought a new Matrix, and I've noticed that the thermometer on the dashboard (right below the odometer) that gives the outside temperature only reads in farenheit. Does anyone know of a way to display this in celsius? The owners manual (page 90) is most unhelpful in this matter.

    Aside from this, it seems like a great car. I've only had mine (light blue, XR, manual) for 1000 miles, so I haven't yet found any flaws beyond that thermometer. I get between 30-32 mpg on mostly highway driving.
  • The reason I'm asking is because the dealer told me the engines are ready to go and there is no "break-in" period. However I read to the contrary in the manual, as deg856 has mentioned...I have 250 mi. on my Matrix.
    Thanks.
  • I found the summer tire rating vs. all season at the Continental Tire website - I matched my tire numbers with theirs. There is information regarding the type of tire and the maximum speed the tire is rated for as well.
    Interesting. I had never heard of Continental Tires from North Carolina.
    Thanks.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    I waited until 500 miles or so before I redlined it or kicked in the VVT the first time. Better safe than sorry I figure.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    As far as I know it only reads in Fahrenheit. If it really bothers you, I guess you could sell it. ;)
  • deg856deg856 Posts: 120
    Break-in period: Whether it is necessary to baby a new car like I do or not, I choose to do it to make me (not necessarily the car) feel better.

    Thermometer - Along with keyless entry, outside temp thermometer is a very pleasant suprise that came with the car. I love it. I'm out of town so I can't check, but I'd be really suprised if there is no way to change the reading to Celcius.
  • proimionproimion Posts: 8
    My last 3 cars have been Camrys, although I only owned one of them a few months before it was totalled in a wreck. I love Toyotas, wouldn't dream of getting a differend brand, but frankly, I'm getting bored of the Camry. That's why the Matrix caught my eye as I'm looking to replace my aging 96 Camry.

    I like everything about the Matrix. There's just one stupid thing holding me back--the demographic the car is marketed to. I'm mid-30's professional, clean-cut, straight arrow type. A co-worker of mine (Acura TL owner) laughed when I mentioned the Matrix--like it is a kids car. Part of me says so what, just get what you want. But I have noticed in the brochure, web site, etc that the Matrix does seem aimed at the young, hip, urban type. Seen the picture with the dreadlocked guy and two young women playing trash-can drums with the Matrix parked alongside?

    I know this is a stupid, unfair thing to judge a car by, but it does have me thinking. What kind of people drive a Matrix?
  • stillageekstillageek Posts: 101
    The Matrix kind of missed it's mark...just like the Honda Element. Both were marketed to the Gen X an Y, however many older persons have purchased them. I see more people 30+ in Elements and Matrix than I do people in my age group (27). Go for it, you won't regret it.
  • deg856deg856 Posts: 120
    I’m a straight laced engineer who’s almost 40, and I was also a little concerned about the edgy image that the Matrix is being marketed. Before I bought the car I thought the optional, deep front air-dam looked too boy-racer for my age, but now it looks just right for the car. The Matrix owners I’ve seen all seemed to be in their mid-30s and up, and I suspect that they, like me, were all drawn to the versatility and space/fuel efficiency of the Matrix more than the racy image that Toyota tried to project. The Matrix functions like a station wagon except it looks much more interesting. Next to the Matrix most three-box sedans look incredibly plain and boring. By the way, I agree that they got the demographics wrong with this car. if I was under 30 and still single, I wouldn’t have gotten the Matrix; I’d get something sportier and less practical.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    deg, that is echoes of me! I am early 30s, single, and bought the Matrix squarely on its looks. Ultimately I traded it in on something more sporty and less practical! :-)

    However, lots of folks in my area have a Matrix that are older than the targeted demographic, and none seem to care a whit. There is a lady who works at the post office who has a base model and has to be at least 45. I asked her about it once, you know, if she had any regrets. She lit up and said NO WAY! very emphatically...

    I have a couple of friends also my age, one married with kid, one single, that both want one.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • thelthel Posts: 767
    you can sell a "young persons car" to an old person, but you can't sell an "old persons car" to a young person.

    Forget the image, go with what you like...I've learned that the hard (expensive) way.
  • herzogtum71herzogtum71 Posts: 470
    I read an article somewhere that talked about Honda missing the targeted demographic with the Element and Toyota with the Matrix because 20-year-olds are going for less expensive cars. The Matrix drivers in my area do seem to be older for the most part, including a number of elderly-looking ladies. My wife and I are 45+, and I know a guy in his 30's at our church who drives a bright yellow Matrix. According to the author of the article, Toyota realized they had missed the mark, looked around, and found that the Scion was very popular in Japan among the demographic group they had targeted for the Matrix. That's why they brought the Scion to America. I have yet to see anyone other than a 20-ish male driving a Scion xB. I haven't really noticed any xA's on the road, but that may be because they look a lot like cars available from other manufacturers.
  • mjtdmjtd Posts: 1
    Matrixes and Vibes sold in the US get the miles and *F gauge cluster. those sold in Canada get kilometers and *C clusters. If you want the thermometer to read in *C, you'd have to replace the whole cluster, and then your speedometer, odometer and trip meters would read in kilometers instead of miles.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    easy to say Matrix missed the youth mark by being too expensive, and that happened because it is a large vehicle, but then what about Scion xB? That is a big car too. What happened is that Matrix got typical Toyota pricing, while the Scions are starting a whole new lower-priced line. Which is a big part of the reason for xB's popularity, I am sure.

    The sticker on my Matrix, which wasn't even an XRS, was $19,5 in 2002 when I bought it, and that is getting up there for "youth budgets".

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • herzogtum71herzogtum71 Posts: 470
    I rode in the back seat of one, and it feels as big as the Matrix. But I believe the overall length is 155 inches. I don't know about the xB pricing, but it looks like you can get a nicely equipped xA for $12,000. Even with the discounts now available on the Matrix at various dealerships, a base Matrix would be at least a couple thousand more than that.
  • capitanocapitano Posts: 509
    I guess if money is tight, then the xB is an option, but for me it just doesn't work. It looks smaller in person than the pictures suggest. It's like a 2/3 scale van. Just odd. But I saw two of them today. Someone is buying them.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    might make a Wrangler 4cyl look fast. At least the top goes down in the Wrangler! :)
  • capitanocapitano Posts: 509
    Yeah, but the xB is supposed to a mobile ganja wagon where all the kids can get stoned. Hard to do that in a wrangler.

    I keep wondering if the xB is going to be something we see on VH-1 when they are running "I love the 2000's" in a couple of decades. People bought gremlins and pacers too.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    but then, the Scions are designed for short lifespans, to ride the wave then be replaced.

    Question to you Matrix fans in here: if Matrix had been a Scion, would you still have put it on your shopping list, and would you have been as likely to buy it? I only pose the question because I suspect it will become a Scion the next time the Corolla is updated...

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • capitanocapitano Posts: 509
    I don't think the branding is an issue for me. If, by becoming a Scion, it has to get some cost cutting, power reduction and silly things like a gauge cluster in the center, then it would likely have dropped from consideration. If, however, the car was identical to what I have purchased but wore only a Scion badge I would still get it. The car is more important than the badging.
  • herzogtum71herzogtum71 Posts: 470
    ... my wife is the one driving the Matrix, and she things the Scion xB is UGLY.

    Nippononly, I don't know if I agree with about the demise of the Corolla. Wasn't it "common knowledge" a few years ago that the Echo was going to replace the Corolla? Now they have redesigned and resized the Corolla, and sales of both the Echo and Corolla seem to be strong enough.
  • I am looking at a Matrix (the base Matrix) all I can afford at this time. I currently drive a 2000 Vitara JLS. I like the car but it is not holding up on the rural desert roads (read dirt/washboard)that exist where I live now. Will the Toyota Matrix hold up MUCH better? TIA.
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