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Buying and Selling Cars: Post Your Experiences

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  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371
    edited September 1

    @driver100 said: The 87 Seville looked more like this 1953 Triumph Mayflower. There were many cars in the 40s that had the bustleback design. My guess is the Seville designers were trying to capture the romance of another era....but, kind of bungled it.

    The Seville certainly wasn't modeled after the Mayflower. As for bungling, I'm not convinced it was bungled. I don't find any pictures of cars which had the style the design was emulating. It was not accepted well and soon disappeared, at least until the BMW styling in the picture, which came later. I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    What brand cars are these?

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,673

    @mako1a said: roadburner, this may be of interest to you and anyone else that likes modified BMWs. http://www.ebay.com/itm/BMW-2002-Pete-McHenrys-personal-M20-from-the-1st-2602-1971-BMW-2002-Roadster-with-Pete-McHenrys-/301294584903?forcerrptr=true&hash=item46268e8447&item=301294584903&pt=US_Cars_Trucks

    That '02 is interesting, but I'm not sure how much it's worth. The engine information is unique, but I'm not sure how big the market is for a decapitated and customized '02. I'd think it would be worth more if it still had a roof and stock trim.

    Getting back to the engine swap, McHenry was an engine guru in the BMW community, but there are dozens of 2002s running around with M20 and M5x engine swaps. There are even a few '02s equipped with E30 M3 motors- informally referred to a "M2s"

    As tweaked 2002s go, this is more my style:

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,673
    edited September 1

    @imidazol97 said:

    I thought that the E65 7er and E60 5er were stylistic abortions- just like the bustle-back Seville. Most Bimmer enthusiasts vilified the "Bangle butt."

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • verdugoverdugo Posts: 2,015

    @nyccarguy said: Thanks verdugo. It's a nice discount (invoice minus 2%), but you need to be a member for 6 months.

    You don't have anything to lose by asking. Aim to get that price. "Look, I like you Mr, Dealer. Can you give me this price now or should I wait 6 months until my membership discount kicks in and I come back?"

    "Why yes, Mr, Nyccarguy, I'll be happy to give you invoice minus 2% right now rather than risk you not coming back in 6 months."

    *** Then End ***

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @imidazol97 said:at least until the BMW styling in the picture, which came later. I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder

    Both weren't the best of designs, people loved or hated both...mostly hated.

    And then there were these beauties....1979 Buick Century. I was working for a division at Warner Brothers and they were renting these for the sales staff. We were so excited we were moving up from 1976 Plymouth Furies to 1979 Buicks.....until we saw them! OMG. One guy got a green one with a brown interior. I think the design only lasted one or two years.

    BTW.....what are the cars in those pictures?

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,778

    I enjoyed looking at those old time car wrecks.

    In those days, it didn't take much of an accident to get killed.

    Heck, that was even the case in the 50's.

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,112

    @driver100 - the 1980 Seville was not inspired by the Triumph Mayflower. It was, though, inspired by the 1950s Rolls Royce Silver Wraith styled by Hooper. Here is an example:

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371
    edited September 1

    @driver100 said: Both weren't the best of designs, people loved or hated both...mostly hated.

    There were lots of that bustleback Seville sold in this midwest area during their new era. BUT I can't recall the last time I've seen one in the wild. Nor can I recall seeing one at car shows/cruise ins. Not a one.

    But, on the other hand, I've seen many Cadillacs that have been preserved or restored. That's kind of odd.

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371

    @ab348 said: driver100 - the 1980 Seville was not inspired by the Triumph Mayflower. It was, though, inspired by the 1950s Rolls Royce Silver Wraith styled by Hooper. Here is an example:

    Now that's stately and beautiful.

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,112

    @imidazol97 said: There were lots of that Seville sold in this midwest area during their new era. BUT I can't recall the last time I've seen one in the wild. Nor can I recall seeing one at car shows/cruise ins. Not a one.

    But, on the other hand, I've seen many Cadillacs that have been preserved or restored. That's kind of odd.

    Locally there are a few first-generation Sevilles around that have been well-preserved. Aside from perhaps paint I think they must be mostly original cars. Can't imagine trying to restore one.

    The second generation cars are just not to be seen in these parts. I do remember driving one when new. I was a flunky working at my first job just out of university and got invited to join the owner of the company I worked for and our Controller for lunch one day. They both had several drinks at lunch and asked me to drive them back to the office. The Controller had a new bustleback Seville. All I remember about it was that it had the lightest, lowest-effort power steering I ever experienced. Zero road feel and almost zero effort to steer.

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,789

    Awhile back we were discussing watches and someone mentioned getting an expensive watch (a brand I cannot recall) at a big discount on a cruise. Well a few days ago I was on a cruise when they held a sale on Invicta watches. Man that was a feeding frenzy but I managed to sneak in and found a watch with a MSRP of $800 priced at $120 (85% off). Nice looking and feeling watch that I came very close to buying but decided against it (I normally carry a pocket watch when I carry a watch).

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @ab348 said: driver100 - the 1980 Seville was not inspired by the Triumph Mayflower. It was, though, inspired by the 1950s Rolls Royce Silver Wraith styled by Hooper. Here is an example:

    That looks more like a Seville, but, somehow, it looks better on the Rolls.

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @imidazol97 said:But, on the other hand, I've seen many Cadillacs that have been preserved or restored.

    There seems to be a few oddities about the cars people make into classics. Chevrolet outsold Ford almost every year in the 50s, with the big exceptions being 1957 and 1959. You would think people would make a 57 Ford the real catch...but, for some reason the 57 Chevy became the big classic car. I think the Ford should be the more coveted car, it is a much more creative design.

    It's just a personal choice I guess, that's why some people buy Fords and some Chevs (or Mustangs and Camaros, etc etc.)

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371

    @driver100 said: Chevrolet outsold Ford almost every year in the 50s, with the big exceptions being 1957 and 1959. You would think people would make a 57 Ford the real catch...but, for some reason the 57 Chevy became the big classic car.

    We agree on that. I like the 57 Ford high line much better than the Chevy. Must be the engine or maybe the Chevy had better handling, etc., that made it the preferred vehicle of many. Was the Ford a truly new car compared to the 56 Ford or was it just a different body poured onto the same chassis? That idea sticks in my memory from somewhere; as new as the Ford looks, it was based on the earlier chassis. I had a 57 as my first car of my own in the household. 2-door sedan with fake chrome over the posts to mimic a hardtop. Neat.

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @imidazol97 said:

    There is a great 57 Ford site that says the 57 Ford was technologically advanced in many ways at the time. Here is part of what it said; For 1957.....there's a big new kind of Ford with the touch of tomorrow! This brilliant new automotive package is bigger, easier to enter, roomier than ever. Yet it's lower...so low that a man of average height can rest his elbows comfortably on its top! And longer....you're never seen such graceful contour of its sculptured-in-steel body says, "Let's GO"

    What kind of magic made this miracle possible? It all started with a new Inner Ford. For Ford engineers reinvented the automobile. They developed a revolutionary contoured frame......a built-for-keeps body...a new type of low-slung drive...a new level-ride suspension....a wide range of new higher-compression engines. These are but a few of the reasons why this kind of Ford rides silent, solid and secure.

    I remember the ads showed a businessman could sit in the drivers seat and reach down and pick up his briefcase, because the car was so low. 1957 Ford

    This gives the idea of how low the 57 Ford was;

    If you go on the site there are lots of good sections...history, color choices, ads etc.

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,902

    Well a day of firsts and lasts just got started. My son just left for his last first day of school and his sister was in the passenger seat for her first day of high school.

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371
    edited September 2

    @driver100 said: If you go on the site there are lots of good sections...history, color choices, ads etc.

    Interesting post. I was wrong on the year where the skin was new but the underpinnings were essentially carry overs--that was the 1960.
    "The engines were carried over from the 1959 Ford, as was the basic chassis design, but the sheetmetal was updated." --1960 ford - Wikipedia

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @imidazol97 said:

    My Dad had a 59 Ford and then a 60 Meteor which was a Canadian version of a Ford (different grill, rear, chrome). The 59 Ford was a great car at the time, the 60 tried to be more flashy, but some things didn't quite work. They had to add guides on the side of the hood because you couldn't see where the sides were, and, once he clipped a fin pulling out of a parking space...hit the parking meter when driving out....that shouldn't happen.

    1960 Meteor

    Rear of a 60 Meteor:

    Compared to 1960 Ford Galaxie:

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,371

    @driver100 said:

    That picture has lots of 53/54/56 Mercurys in the background when enlarged that can be seen very well.

    The blue green '60 Ford next to the red one is like the one dad bought as his last new car. Had regular hub caps instead of wheel covers and 6-cylinder with manual transmission.

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @imidazol97 said:green '60 Ford next to the red one is like the one dad bought as his last new car. Had regular hub caps instead of wheel covers and 6-cylinder with manual transmission

    My Dad bought a new Ford, Meteor or Mercury every year or two during the 50s, 60s and 70s and into 80s.

    I guess he was a chronic car buyer before his time.....before we knew it was addictive.

    He did travel for work so put on 40K miles a year. Doing that research brought back some good memories of the 50s and 60s.

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 3,888

    @driver100 said: He did travel for work so put on 40K miles a year. Doing that research brought back some good memories of the 50s and 60s.

    Memories of the 50's and 60's? I have trouble remembering the 70's and 80's as well as what I did yesterday!

    2014 Mercedes Benz CLS 550 - best car ever! 2nd best car ever, my 1967 Corvette Stingray Coupe with 435 hp.

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,266

    Having owned both a '57 Chev and '57 Ford in the distant past, I can recall, at least subjectively, that the '57 Chevy was better built, drove better, ran better, held up better, was faster. The Ford was more attractive to my eyes, however, as I thought the '57 Chevy fins just a bit too much. The Ford really felt like a "crate".

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 3,888

    @Mr_Shiftright said: Having owned both a '57 Chev and '57 Ford in the distant past, I can recall, at least subjectively, that the '57 Chevy was better built, drove better, ran better, held up better, was faster. The Ford was more attractive to my eyes, however, as I thought the '57 Chevy fins just a bit too much. The Ford really felt like a "crate".

    My grandfather had a '57 Chevrolet BelAir Sedan until 1962 and my other grandfather had a '57 Ford Sedan until 1965. Way back then, people kept their cars much longer than they do today.

    I remember driving both of them when I got my license in 1961 and I would have to agree with you that the Chevy handled much better than the Ford. The Ford seemed to fishtail more and the weight distribution was awful. The Ford seemed a bit more powerful than the Chevy and the Ford was lower to the center of gravity than the Chevy.

    In short, the Ford was bulkier and bouncier than the Chevy!

    2014 Mercedes Benz CLS 550 - best car ever! 2nd best car ever, my 1967 Corvette Stingray Coupe with 435 hp.

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,778

    I grew up (?) in a " Chevy Town" but I know there were "Ford Towns" too.

    1957 Fords were said to have poor workmanship compared to the Chevys and I remember a 283 equipped Chevy could flat walk away from a 312 Ford.

    A 1957 Dodge D500 could make either look like a six cylinder.

  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,902
    edited September 2

    @Mr_Shiftright said: My grandfather had a '57 Chevrolet BelAir Sedan until 1962 and my other grandfather had a '57 Ford Sedan until 1965. Way back then, people kept their cars much longer than they do today.

    That only applies to you Mike!! :)

    In reality, people are keeping cars longer and longer. Back in 1970 (first year I could find data for), the average age of cars was 5.6 years. In 2000, it was 9 years. Today, it's 11.4 years.

    https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ohim/onh00/line3.htm

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=average age of cars on the road

    I look at my three cars and I'm at 8.8 years average.

  • laurasdadalaurasdada Posts: 2,686

    @snakeweasel said: Well a few days ago I was on a cruise when they held a sale on Invicta watches. Man that was a feeding frenzy but I managed to sneak in and found a watch with a MSRP of $800 priced at $120 (85% off). Nice looking and feeling watch that I came very close to buying but decided against it (I normally carry a pocket watch when I carry a watch).

    Check out ShopHQ.com for a treasure trove of Invicta watches (and many other "made for TV" brands...). Oftentimes with 6 payments same as cash. Similar discounts across the board. For some reason, when I come across their watch show on TV (Sunday/Monday nights, sometimes more. I think they sell a lot of watches on TV!), I get mesmerized (being a psuedo-watch guy). I've got a couple from them, not fancy, but functional, especially my diver watch w/Japanese automatic movement.

    '13 Jaguar XF, '11 BMW 535xi, '02 Lexus RX300

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @robr2 said:the average age of cars was 5.6 years. In 2000, it was 9 years. Today, it's 11.4 years. I look at my three cars and I'm at 8.8 years average.

    I heard that number the other day...average age of a car today is 11 years! I am wondering if a reason is because people have more 2nd cars these days, and so the mileage gets broken up between them, and one car won't be used nearly as much.

    When I heard that statistic they said it was because todays cars last longer. It seems to me that you could probably get 200 or 300K miles out of a car today fairly easily....I don't remember cars going more than much over 100k in the good old days...50s and 60s.

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    @Mr_Shiftright said:'57 Chevy was better built, drove better, ran better, held up better, was faster. The Ford was more attractive to my eyes,

    My father had a 57 Ford, my Uncle a 57 Chev, and I think I would say the same. The Chev was pretty rock solid, the Ford...not so much. I believe Chev made a much better 6 cyl engine, but Ford was good with their 8s. Chevys were finished off nicer, and somehow that style became a classic, I think because of the bullets on the hood. Ford certainly looked more modern at the times...longer, lower, wider......but futuristic isn't always better for nostalgia purposes.

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 12,423

    One more....when wagons looked like wagons.....

    2012 535ix 2013 Audi A4 2013 Passat

  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,902
    edited September 2

    @driver100 said: I heard that number the other day...average age of a car today is 11 years! I am wondering if a reason is because people have more 2nd cars these days, and so the mileage gets broken up between them, and one car won't be used nearly as much.

    When I heard that statistic they said it was because todays cars last longer. It seems to me that you could probably get 200 or 300K miles out of a car today fairly easily....I don't remember cars going more than much over 100k in the good old days...50s and 60s.

    In 1970, there were were 89.2 million registered cars in America and a population of 203.3 million - so about 43% penetration. In 2010, there was about 252.4 million registered cars and a population of 308.7 million - 82% penetration. I think it's more cars per family/household and that the cars of today can go much longer than in 1970.

    When I was a kid, my Dad used to get a car every 3 years. Mind you, he drove a lot - maybe 15K miles a year and he didn't trust cars beyond 50K. My Mom eventually got a car because she worked and she couldn't take the bus to work anymore. Very few families in my neighborhood had two cars and I recall many who didn't have one at all.

    Today, there are 3 cars in my household and some homes in my neighborhood have a car for every kid and adult.

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