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Low End Sedans (under $16k)

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Comments

  • "sedan refers to a fixed-roof car with at least four doors or any fixed-roof two-door car with at least 33 cubic feet of rear interior volume, according to measurements based on SAE standard J11OO"
  • joe97joe97 Posts: 2,248
    It's a cloud definition, for the most part, because by requirement, a RX-8 can be considered a sedan.

    Personally, I view anything with a lifgate as a hatchback, whether being two-door, or four-door.
  • As much as I'm glad about what you think "personally," this forum is entitled under 16K sedans and as such will contain discussions about any "sedan" under 16K.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,732
    I'm not interested in the Aveo because when I drove it last I didn't like it nearly as well as competitors like the Fit and Accent (or Yaris or Rio for that matter). But maybe the '07 will be improved enough for consideration. However, I don't see a reason to take a chance on what is essentially a Daewoo with a Chevy-style warranty (meaning short), when there are several other solid choices in this class to choose from.

    Why do you refer to me as a "spokesperson"? A spokesperson of what? Does the fact that I have owned Hyundais and have said some positive things about them (also many negative things) make me a spokesperson for them? If so, then I guess I am a spokesperson for Hyundai. Also for Mazda, Honda, Toyota, Ford/Mercury, Dodge, Chevy, Mitsubishi, and Nissan.
  • I'm curious. Please post what negative things you have said about Hyundai. And provide links to the post #.

    A cursory search of every post you have made dating back to October 2005 yields not a single "negative" post.
  • shado4shado4 Posts: 287
    You are right about the 5 speed manual Yaris. I own a hatchback with a 5 speed manual and have seen several base model sedans in the Memphis area (38118) with manual transmissions. What is your zip code?

    This question should actually be directed to inharmsway since he is the one looking for a base Yaris sedan with a manual transmission, not me.

    In fact I am not even considering the Yaris or the Fit for one very important reason (to me, at least): a power sunroof is not available in either car.
  • ross14ross14 Posts: 36
    Apparently, South Korea prefers the East Coast, (Before the Midwest?), since we finally got the 2007 Accent hatchback in Queens, NYC. The driver's seat is flawless in support, & the rear seating is spacious. The sticker price (GS):$10495 m.t. Add AC & radio pkg.(1350), & dest. & sticker final cost was $13395. For the "SE": $14915 ( includes AT ) + delivery= $15580. Both cars looked ready to challenge the competition.
  • ross14ross14 Posts: 36
    Obviously, every car is built by humans. Someone designs the assembly processes, the robots, etc. The reality check for these humans is "Consumer Reports", & J.D.POwers. Talk all you want. The cars in "RED" are well made, & the cars that get "Black", for years (Decades), SUCK.
  • inharmswayinharmsway Posts: 153
    My zip code is 95662. But right now I am leaning more towards a 2006/07 hyundai accent.
  • lhansonlhanson Posts: 268
    I went to the Toyota website, used your zip code, and was able to build a car in a hatchback with 5 speed manual transmission with any features I wanted. Several local dealers claimed to have the sedan in stock, although I was not able to come up with a hatchback.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,732
    I'm curious. Please tell me how you went about doing a cursory search of every post I have made that relates to Hyundai in Town Hall since October 2005. I would like to know how you did that, and how much time it took you. I just did a "Search" on "backy Hyundai" and it returned only 200 results (the maximum allowed), and it went back only a few weeks.

    Anyway, since this is a car discussion and not a court of law where I am on trial, I don't really see the point of taking your time and my time with all this foolishness, do you? Maybe to save everyone's time, some people who have been following the Hyundai-related discussions for the past few years can vouch for my claim that I have made negative statements about Hyundais (e.g. my tirades about the IIHS frontal crash test result on the '01 Elantra and how Hyundai responded to it).

    And then we can get back to talking about cars, instead of individuals. It does amaze me though why you have such interest in what I say and why. Wouldn't you rather talk about cars?
  • moparbadmoparbad Posts: 3,842
    Ah, so there are no options on the Rabbit! Interesting marketing strategy. But that also means that owners can't get options such as a power moonroof or alloy wheels.

    Incorrect.

    image
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,732
    I'm not surprised. But I'm not the one who said that everything is standard on the Rabbit. I was relying on that information when I commented on the lack of options.
  • moparbadmoparbad Posts: 3,842
    Ah, so there are no options on the Rabbit! Interesting marketing strategy. But that also means that owners can't get options such as a power moonroof or alloy wheels.

    You relied on incorrect information. ;)

    Now you know. ;)
  • reddroverrreddroverr Posts: 509
    . This list spotlights the cars with the lowest residual values for 2006 — that is, they're likely to depreciate the most during the ownership period. Below, we show the percentage of its original value that each vehicle is likely to retain after five years with an annual mileage of 15,000.
    These cars aren't as bad a deal as you might think. Many of them are very inexpensive to begin with. Furthermore, cars with low residual values can be bargains when purchased used, since you'll likely be able to purchase a car on this list for far less than you'd pay for a competing vehicle more adept at holding its value.

    1 2006 Ford Focus — 14.4%2 2006 Dodge Stratus — 14.7%
    3 2006 Kia Optima — 16.2%
    4 2006 Nissan Sentra — 17.8%5 2006 Suzuki Reno — 18.2%
    6 2006 Kia Rio — 20.2% 7 2006 Chrysler Sebring — 20.3%
    8 2006 Hyundai Elantra — 20.4% 9 2006 Kia Spectra — 21.9%
    10 2006 Mercury Grand Marquis — 22.6%
  • reddroverrreddroverr Posts: 509
    Well, potential buyers, take note: With resale value in mind, we've compiled this list of the 10 cars likely to depreciate the least during ownership. Included is the percentage of its original value that each vehicle is likely to retain after five years, with an annual mileage of 15,000. Our residual value percentages are based on each car's national True Market ValueSM (TMV) price, plus typical options and destination charge.

    2006 Mini Cooper — 54 percent 2006 Dodge Viper — 52.5 percent
    2006 Toyota Camry Solara — 52 percent
    2006 Honda S2000 — 51.4 percent
    2006 Porsche 911 — 50 percent
    2006 BMW M3 — 48.7 percent
    2006 Volkswagen New Beetle — 48.6 percent
    2006 Toyota Matrix — 48.3 percent
    2006 Acura RSX — 48.3 percent
    2006 BMW 3 Series — 48.2 percent

    Of course these aren't really the cars we are looking at. Wonder how the Fit and Yaris will figure.
  • tsgeiseltsgeisel Posts: 352
    Probably the most overrated auto statistic out there - as far as it applies to me.

    In the last 15 years, I've owned 2 cars. If you plan on keeping your car a long time, the residual just isn't that important. A small added bonus, but not much of a concern.
  • randydriverrandydriver Posts: 262
    I really dont care about that because I own my cars so long. It matters much more to me about the mechanics and the looks of the car.
  • johnnyvjjohnnyvj Posts: 112
    Probably the most overrated auto statistic out there - as far as it applies to me.

    In the last 15 years, I've owned 2 cars. If you plan on keeping your car a long time, the residual just isn't that important. A small added bonus, but not much of a concern.


    I'd tend to disagree... the difference between a car that holds its value and one that depreciates quickly can cost you thousands, even after holding on to a vehicle for 5-10 years.

    Somewhere else its posted that the Ford Focus only fetches 14% of its initial price after 5 years. In the list above, some cars fetch more than 50% of their initial price... a 36% of sticker difference, aka several thousand dollars.

    That's huge, frankly. :surprise:

    And even if you were to hold onto a car a few years past that and the differences were halved, it'd still be huge. Maybe if I ever make it big in the stock market, I'd feel differently. :wink:
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,732
    Edmunds' estimates don't hold up in the real world in my experience. For instance, I recently sold my '01 Elantra GLS 5-speed with only cruise and remote locking as options after 5-1/2 years of ownership for 50% of its purchase price. Retaining only 20% of value after 5 years is ridiculous, except maybe if they are figuring from MSRP and selling for auction value for a car that isn't in good condition.
  • johnnyvjjohnnyvj Posts: 112
    Regardless, there's just some cars that you're going to get less for when you go to trade-in, and some cars you'll get more.

    With Honda and Toyota, you tend to get more. I know this from experience. :wink:

    With the Focus getting disastrous resale, I can only assume that's from its early history of mechanical problems, which I think have been at least partly addressed by Ford by now. Perhaps resale here is acting as a 'lagging indicator'.

    Ditto for all the Kias on the poor resale value list (three)... I'm assuming that they're getting the short end of the stick due to past reliability problems, and the product has improved a bit recently.
  • micwebmicweb Posts: 1,617
    "To raise fuel efficiency and cut emissions, the new [1.8]engine uses Toyota's variable valve timing for both intake and output strokes [what, it didn't before?] -- known as Dual VVT-i -- and ultralight pistons. It also reduces friction by using roller bearings in the rocker arms. [I think the Fit has the roller bearing feature now.]

    To make the engine smaller and lighter, Toyota used a modular front section of the engine, which incorporates the water pump and chain cover.

    Toyota also used smaller-diameter spark plugs to reduce engine size."

    ----------excerpts from Autoweek
  • moparbadmoparbad Posts: 3,842
    Is the new 1.8 engine in the Yaris?
  • lhansonlhanson Posts: 268
    No it comes with a 1.5 engine.
  • moparbadmoparbad Posts: 3,842
    What low end sedan is the new 1.8 being used in? :confuse:
  • micwebmicweb Posts: 1,617
    Corolla and Matrix.
  • alpha01alpha01 Posts: 4,747
    I don't know if you were being sarcastic, but no, the 1.8L was not Dual VVTi previously...

    ~alpha
  • randydriverrandydriver Posts: 262
    Isnt that in the new Nissan Versa?
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,732
    Yes, non-VVT though.
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