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Audi A4 Maintenance and Repair

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  • I have a 2007 A4 2.0T with the same problem. Burn about 1 quart every 2000 miles since the first 3000 miles of use. I have 9400 miles on the car. The problem is with the PCV valve which tends to fail, thus allowing the high pressure from the intake manifold to leak into the crankcase when the turbo is activated. At 8625 miles I have installed Audi's redesigned PCV valve assembly (It is called a PCV pump by Audi/VW). I have observed no oil burning since. The part cost $75 and there is an hour labor involved. I am trying to get re-inbursed by Audi. We shall see. Ay least the oil loss stopped. It is not really "burning", but venting from the pressurized crankcase. You also are lowering your performance, because leaking from the intake to the crankcase reduces turbo pressure from the 0.9 BAR design point.
  • I am really interested in buying this certified 2006 Audi A4 that I saw last weekend at a dealer's lot. I test drove it and the final offer from dealer is 23,900 + TTL

    Specs: 2006 Audi A4 (registered Sept 2006)
    2.0T Automatic Quattro
    It is certified upto 6yrs/100,000 miles.

    Is this a good deal and how is the reliability of this car? Can I trust the Audi certified warranty?
  • It is a great car to drive. However, you must accept the inconvenience of carrying a quart of oil in your trunk, check the oil level at every time you refill your tank and use roughly a quart of oil every 1200 miles (Audi's level of acceptable oil usage). You will need about 8 quarts between the recommended oil change interval of 10,000 miles. iI you are lucky, or rather if the turbine is not engaged a lot, it might use less.
  • It may not burn and it may not leak at the bottom and still use oil. The problem is that the the PCV pump system's check valve, the one tied directly to the intake manifold after the turbo, is not closing consistently when the turbo inreases the pressure. The increased pressure then leaks into the crankcase that the other end of the PCV pump assembly is unable to vent completely to the pre turbo section of the intake manifold. The oil leaves in part through the orifice of the dipstick tube, You pull out the dipstick and you will find oil residue on the inlet shoulder. You will also find oil residue on the cowling.
  • my central locking system is not working thru the use of the remote. i already replaced the battery of the remote and the same is happening. now i have to lock and unlock manually using the key and it's only the driver's door that's working and the rest are not. and the lock/unlocking button inside by the driver side is not working either. but the alarm system is working. anybody can help me. thank you very much.
  • continuation of the locking system. i forgot, i already checked all the fuses and everything is fine, they are all in good condition. thanks again
  • Yeah but if it was being pushed out the dipstick hole, the engine bay would be an awful mess. You can imagine this by spraying a quart of oil into your engine bay.

    I think a bad PCV could definitely cause more oil burning however, forcing oil past the rings and giving us the phenomenon called "blowby".

    Another sign of blowby might be a very oily air filter.
  • Check your owners manual - there is likely a re-set procedure needed after changing the battery in the key fob.
  • Spraying oil into the engine compartment would be a sign of a plugged PCV valve with oil squirting out. Here, the the valve, which is suppose to close when there is positive pressure in the in-take manifold is staying open. the only thing you will see is an oil residue on the cowling, near the oil fill cap and oil deposit on the ring at the end of the dipstick handle and the seat underneath it. If you have instrumentation you can also measure the pressure drop at the turbo output, where the 0.9 Bar normal pressure will drop by about a tenth, because of the leak into the crankcase. We are not talking about a very large amount of oil. My loss is about a quart in 1800-2000 miles. Used to be a quart every 3000 miles. There are lots of suggested fixes. Here is one http://www.golfmkv.net/blog/archives/23. Here is another http://deviantspeed.com/the-ultimate-20t-pcv-fix.
  • Thank you for that explanation, but still, a quart of oil is somewhere in the engine compartment (or am I misreading what you are saying?). Where does the oil go, this 1/2 quart every 1,000 miles? Either burn or leak, that's it right?
  • That is right. Some burns no doubt, though my tail pipe finger test comes up negative. Evaporation into the engine compartment might be expelled by the fan, though I have distinct oil deposit on the cowl around the oil refill cap. Audi states that even 1 quart per 1000 miles is acceptable engine performance and I am half of that.
  • Okay got it. I could live with a quart every 2,000 as long as it never got worse. I don't see Audi doing anything about it anyway, since it is "in spec".
  • I just purchased this 98 Audi A4 and I rolled the back drivers side window down and it wont go up. I can turn the key on and pulled the window switch and it will go up about 1-2 inches and automatically go down. I got it up by turning the key on and my husband held the window up and then I had to turn the key off and back on and it would roll up another 1-2 inches while he held it up. I had to do this til I got it completely up and it stayed. The drivers side front also don't work. I was wondering what might be wrong with it. Can anyone help me with this?
  • You are of course absolutely right. Audi won't do anything on the basis of the oil loss, after all there are some New Beetles, without turbo which use even more oil. However, Audi might be forced to do something because of the pressure leak from the turbocharged section of the manifold. Once the check-valve fails in the PCV assembly, the turbo can never develop the 0.9 Bar (about 13 psi) pressure. This impacts engine performance. All the proposed fixes on the net are addressing this performance loss, not the issue of oil loss. The oil loss is just a symptom.
  • Yes that makes perfect sense, thanks for explaining that further.
  • Hi. I tried to do a 'search' but didn't have much luck.

    I have an 02 1.8T with about 78k miles on it. I recently had to have the battery replaced and now I'm experiencing electrical issues. It started with the dome light and door open lights staying on after the doors were all closed. Then the windows stopped working. Sometimes everything would be fine, but the last few days the windows aren't working and the dome light remains on.

    My local mechanic suggested there was some sort of TSB out there regarding water getting into the wiring harness. The numbers he gave me were: Recall: Group 97; Number 02-01, Date: Oct 2, 2002. Subject: Door Electrical Components Malfunctioning.

    Has anyone experienced this problem? Is it a recall? Is it covered by Audi or should I expect to pay a large chunk of change?

    Thanks.
  • It's not a recall, it's a TSB: Dealer is under no obligation to repair this, and if he does, it's on your nickel as a rule, with a car this old.

    Does this sound like your symptoms?

    Group: 97

    Number: 02-01

    Date: Oct. 2, 2002
    Subject:
    Door Electrical Components, Malfunctioning

    Model(s):

    A4 2002

    Condition

    Electrical components operated via door control modules and/or switches malfunctioning such as window regulators, instrument cluster door ajar light, interior lights and door lights. Symptoms include:
    ^ Doors cannot be locked or unlocked by remote control.

    ^ Window regulators do not work.

    ^ Inside lights sporadically do not go out.

    ^ Display in cluster shows doors open when all doors are shut.

    ^ Door lights do not work. Vehicle may exhibit one or more of these symptoms at the same time.

    May be caused by water ingress into the wire harness contact housing at the A-pillar or B-pillar which leads to corrosion of individual terminals.
  • Thanks, Mr Shiftright. That sounds an awful lot like what I'm experiencing. Since the car is so old, and Audi isn't under an obligation to pay, I doubt they'll help. Any ideas as to what we are looking at here as far as cost?
  • I guess that depends on:

    1. Are they familiar with this corroded terminal business and have they done it before? (If so, they know right where to look)

    2. Where ARE these corroded terminals? Accessible or buried somewhere.

    it would be great if you showed them the TSB and asked them what they know about it.

    If you are in the San Francisco area I can send you to excellent Audi people.
  • Unfortunately, I'm in the St. Louis area.

    They asked if the car had been in deep water (we've had floods in the area) - my car hasn't, btw. So I guess they know something about it. But they didn't mention the TSB at all.

    I guess I need to prepare myself for an expensive repair. :-(
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