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Best Truck to Put a Snow Plow On?

dodgeramdodgeram Posts: 202
edited March 1 in General
I own 2 rams both used for plowing both got to be
the best trucks I ever owned!

Comments

  • Ford superdutys have a snowplow prep package listed in their options. Also there are so many configuration choices for the truck its great. Supercab, crew cab, 4X4, 4X2, SRW, DRW just about however you want it. Check it out.
  • stanfordstanford Posts: 606
    The fact is that they can all do it. I drive an F350 so I'm biased, but I'd point out that the Ford has been redesigned most recently and so has the nicest feature set (IMO). When Chevy overhauls its large trucks they'll probably be nicer (more powerful/comfortable/etc) still.
  • sd99sd99 Posts: 65
    Been snow plowing with Fords for 14 years and I have to say I've never been stranded. I've got a new super duty coming in any day now and I expect this truck to be even better than the previous models. I'll let all of you know.
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    Best plow truck I ever saw was the old little Bronco (pre 1978). My dad's best friend had one at his service station. Sucker could clear a lot in no time but could also turn on a dime to really get the corners done right. A small blade on a Wrangler today would probably do a nice job too.
  • You don't need a huge powerful truck to plow. If your doing it right your truck is on nearly clean ground behind the plow, that's the best place for traction. I recommend the shorter the vehicle the better. I've been stuck highcentered and sideways in a steep drive more than once with my 25'long extended cab long bed plow(ECLBP). (kind of embarrassing in your own drive.)
    Check out western's Snow Plows at www.westernplows.com
    Good site. Also you could E:Mail or call and ask for their Volume 2,1998 "Western's OpenRoads" newsletter. It has an article "Selecting the Right Truck for the Job"
    Happy plowing.
    P.S. I personally would still get my new ECLBP, my friend will still tow me out of the drive if I plow his for free.
  • jbpjbp Posts: 1
    It depends on what you want to plow. For large industrial parking lots... it's hard to beat a 10-12 foot Gledhill on the front of a International single axle dump with a tail gate salter. For small parking lots use a short wheel base truck and a light weight 7 1/2 foot Western snow plow.

    A Hiniker plow might be the solution for someone who wants to take a plow on and off in 5 minutes. No tools are required and everything stays on the plow. The pump,lights and hardware do not end up riding on the front of your truck full time.
  • Dodge Ram dually 4x4 with a Cummins Turbo Diesel.
    This is a work horse that will run all day and beg for more!
  • kDUKEkkDUKEk Posts: 10
    I have a 1991 Ford F-150 standard cab long bed pickup truck with a Ford Remanufactured 5.0 L 302 V8.

    Is there a plow package that is designed for the F-150 or the half-ton pickup trucks? I refused to allow myself to wreck this much-money-invested clunker for a snow plow. However, if there is such a package for the half-ton pickup, I will strongly consider buying one.

    Thank you for your help!

    Duke
  • I'VE BEEN PLOWING LARGE AND SMALL COMMERCIAL LOTS FOR 11 YEARS. MOST OF THESE POSTS ARE RIGHT ON TRACK. SMALL TRUCKS WORK WELL IN SMALL LOTS. 3/4 TON OR 1 TON PICKUPS WILL DO BIGGER LOTS. FRO REALLY BIG LOTS YOU NEED MEDIUM DUTY TRUCKS AND LOADERS. I DOO BIG LOTS WITH 2 ONE TONS AND A 3/4 TON. WE WILL PLOW EVERY THREE TO FOUR INCHES AND KEEP REPLOWING UNTIL THE SNOW STOPS. NO NEED FOR A LOADER THAT WAY. EVEN IN A 23" BLIZZARD WE KEPT OUR LOTS CLEAR. IF ALL YOU HAVE IS A HALF TON PICKUP AND YOU ARE DOING SOME DRIVEWAYS OR SMALL MCDONALDS PARKING LOTS, THEN YOU'LL BE FINE, BUT REMEMBER TO PLOW 3-4 INCHES AT A TIME. IF YOU WAIT TILL 10"S IS ON THE GROUND YOU'LL WORRK THE HALF TON SUSPENSION TOO HARD.
  • dodgeramdodgeram Posts: 202
    Just finised plowing the first major snowfall of the year, 12inches of heavy sleet snow and ice. We have a 5acre truckstop, and the only snow removal equipment we have is a 94 3/4ton 4x4 dodge ram. it has a eight foot meyers plow, and we waited until all the snow fell. And right across the road from us theres another truck stop, about 8 acres,paved lot, and they worked all night, and day with a backhoe, giant grader, three 4x4's. All we used was are ram and got the job done in 3 and half hours. We put 120km on it today and that was just in our lot!, alot of tire spining, but the truck pushed it reassonably well, considering there was 12inches of heavy wet sleet and snow. If you buy these trucks to plow, definetly get the 5.9litre gas, will push any amount of snow, and has a great low bass exaust note that will keep you smiling, and not getting tired.
  • tombatomba Posts: 8
    I've been plowing in Tahoe for twenty-five years. We get an annual average of fifty-two feet per year of "Sierra Cement" . The equipment on a plow truck is probably more important than the make. The best truck I've used is a GMC 3/4 ton V8, gotta have automatic or you'll burn clutches. The limited slip rear end makes a big difference. A high output alternator, tranny cooler, big radiator, skid plates, and heavy front suspension (these sometimes come with the snow plow prep package) are great.
    Professionals should have power windows, since they get snow-packed in a blizzard, and a rear window/rear view mirror defroster.
    In addition, the type of plow you get makes a huge difference in the plowing. A Meyers Electrotouch (very quick angle turns) with a plastic (polyethelene??) blade which decreases the friction of snow on the blade and makes it much easier to push aside is the best I've used. However, I just bought a Snow-Way plastic blade with downpressure. Its much lighter and also detaches very easily.
    Never put chains on a plow truck. That's how you break axles. Studded snows will work fine and much more reliably. They will also break traction before you break the truck. Change them after the snow season and they will last many seasons.
    I ordered a new 3/4 ton Chevy on October 24 with all the above options, but I haven't heard a word about when it might come in. I'm about ready to give up on them. Good thing it hasn't snowed much this year. Last winter we got 190% of that 52 foot average. I was plowing, awake or asleep, all winter long.
  • RichRich Posts: 128
    OK, guys. Considering that I've already caught all the spears that have been thrown........

    I just don't understand this 'Snow Plow' thing. What is it? And more importantly, why does the 'Snow' have to be plowed? ;-)

    Today the weather was crummy. It only got up to 78 degrees (Lately its been in the mid 80s.) and there were just enough clouds over the Pacific to make a beautiful sunset. I sure hope it warms up tomorrow so I can wax my truck. ;-)
  • dave40dave40 Posts: 582
    You Might need one when your mud slides come this spring !
  • i have a 85 3/4 ton with a 350 and turbo 400 trannybest plowing truck i ever had!
  • chineschines Posts: 1
    Don't rule out Chevy,I have been pushing snow with a 93 ext cab for 4 years.It is capable of good service.The drawbacks are turning radius on Chevy is larger than the others.The torsion bar front springs also must be readjusted to carry the extra weight of the plow.Tinted windows should be avoided in the rear if possible.Never had a complaint about power or comfort in my Silverado.Not everyone needs a superduty type truck to plow with,I started plowing with a Jeep CJ 7 years ago.Hope this helps.Pray for snow!
This discussion has been closed.