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Hyundai Elantra Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • nodulenodule Posts: 118
    Backy,

    I justed checked with my mechanic and the Wix oil filter
    he uses has a "silicone anti-drain back valve."

    Sounds like that should be the one, right?!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    You'd be better off asking someone at Wix.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    In independent oil filter testing, Purolator's PureONE consistently ranks number 1. Most of the regular posters in this thread are already aware of this.

    Nevertheless, given the very small price differential between the PureONE and the OEM Hyundai filter, I'm simply going to use the Hyundai filter each time. Since I change my oil every 3K or 3 months, the differential in the quality of the two filters is probably going to be insignificant. And, there will be no warranty questions should a problem arise. I actually take a date-stamped JPG of the filter and process each time I personally change oil, and file it in my Elantra service file folder for future reference.
  • 5port5port Posts: 395
    >I actually take a date-stamped JPG of the filter and >process each time I personally change oil, and file it in >my Elantra service file folder for future reference.

    Composition books dont crash.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    That's true, but neither do printed date-stamped JPGs in a file folder.
  • All buyers are liars and all sellers are embellishers, right?

    interesting...
  • 1racefan1racefan Posts: 932
    My '02 GLS currently has 80,000 miles on it. To give a little background info, at 45,000 miles (a little over 2 years ago), the battery and alternator were replaced with another Hyundai battery - not an Interstate battery (I looked all over it, and no where on it does it say Interstate).

    Last night, I was vacuuming it out, and my neighbor came over and started talking...and talking. The doors stayed open (with the dome light on) for a total of 30 minutes or so. This morning, when I was leaving for work it took about 5 tries for the car to start. Once it started, it ran fine on my 25 mile commute to work. I went out to the car about an hour after I got to work this morning and it started up fine.

    Here's my question - I am assuming the alternator is fine since the car ran once it finally started (and since it's only 2 years old or so). Would the problem most likely be a weak battery that maybe got a little drained when I left the doors open with the dome light on for 30 minutes last night - or could it be the starter? I live in the south where it gets pretty hot this time of year, so it's not unusual for batteries to die prematurely.

    Any thoughts?

    P.S. - let me add that the terminals did corrode a while back, and I did clean them with baking soda and water, and put a layer of lithium grease on them - that corrosion may have drained the battery a bit???
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    I would just keep an eye on it and see if the problem recures. If you have a volt meter, put it across the battery terminals with all the lights off and see if the voltage drops steadily. If it drops more than about .5 volts in 30mins or so, there is a shorted cell in the battery.
  • 1racefan1racefan Posts: 932
    Thanks for the quick response - If it is just the battery, at least that's a cheap (relatively) and easy fix.
  • newsviewnewsview Posts: 33
    Please excuse this long post. I’m back to this forum after a year-long absence to update my saga with my Elantra — and I could still use some help if anything I'm about to share rings some bells.

    Since 150 or so miles on the car I’ve heard a cold engine acceleration rattle. The dealer has tested valve clearances, timing and the thrust bearing/washer without finding the culprit. Meanwhile, over the past two years I lost about 2mpg on city driving. This past week, upon removing my spark plugs, the dealer reports they are carbon fouled (but attribute it to bad gas — yet I do NOT experience any misfiring associated with poor gas and using premium has never helped improve performance or reduce rattling sounds, either). In any case, the spark plugs — with less than half the 100,000 mile rated life — had to be replaced.

    In all this time, the rattling noise has become increasingly obvious (10-20 minutes or so when the weather is cold.) Nevertheless, I have never seen a check engine light. I've been told that any problem with the engine — fuel/air ratio, knocking, etc. — will trigger a CEL, and since there is no CEL there is no problem. On the other hand, I KNOW there is something wrong because I’ve visited these forums for years and have not found a lot of people describing problems like what I’m expriencing (which means I can't simply infer that what I hear is “normal”). Even a Hyundai corporate rep who came out to my dealer a year or so back didn't deny a problem once he heard the engine rattle on a cool, damp morning. Unfortunately, the rep claims he doesn't know the cause of the sound (he instead replaced a motor mount, which didn't help).

    I once took my Elantra to another Hyundai dealer in hopes of answers after the folks here in this forum basically agreed my dealer was incompetent. The upshot is the other dealer’s tech took my car for a drive one cool morning and concluded the valve clearances either were (or sounded like) they were out of spec. Valve noise is also the impression independent mechanics got when they took a listen to the noise. So here I am thinking they are closing in on the culprit, yet this same corporate rep came out and checked valve clearances for himself and said they were NOT out of spec as had been claimed by the Hyundai tech. So now I'm left with possible spark knock (based upon my own research into the causes of carbon deposits on the spark plugs). Other than the 2mpg loss, however, I haven’t noticed poor startup, hesitation or any other performance symptoms (other than the engine rattle, that is). At one point, I did have to refill about 1 cup of engine coolant before and again after a 2,000 mile trip — but that was attributed to the dealer to my coolant cap rather than the engine running too hot (which can also cause carbon on spark plugs due to autodetination). Consequently, the only certainty is that the engine rattle I hear is most evident in cool weather under acceleration. Does any of this sound familiar to anyone reading my post yet?

    I've heard that a sticky valve or improper engine compression can cause carbon-fouled spark plugs, too. My only explanation for why this situation continues to drag on and on unresolved is that nobody who works on cars nowadays — at least at my dealer, anyhow — really knows what to do with a problem that does not register on the PCM (on-board computer). So this brings me to my next question for those who have some mechanical know-how or related experience: Is it possible that my Elantra’s computer and/or a sensor — such as the knock sensor — are faulty and therefore do not trip a CEL even though there IS an engine problem (as evidenced by the fact that I have carbon deposits on my spark plugs despite the low mileage)? I've tried better gas, oil additives, etc. The only thing that seems to help quiet the engine during cold-engine acceleration is the hot summer weather. So if it is spark plug knock, would it correlate to outdoor temperature/weather — or am I barking up the wrong tree?

    Now for the second and final issue: I have ABS and four-wheel disc brakes that tend to "thump" in the back when my foot rests on the pedal at a stop. Taking my foot entirely off the pedal or stomping down harder on the brake eliminates the loud thumping. These aren’t faint sounds. Anyone standing outside the car when the thudding sounds begin can also hear it — yet braking performance seems unaffected. I've also heard it shortly after pulling into my driveway and putting the car in park. Once again, the car has less than 30,000 miles on the odometer, yet the rear brakes have less than 20 percent brake pad remaining whereas the front brake pads have about 50 percent wear. One would think that the warranty would cover the dealer ruling out the possibility of brake grabbing or an ABS sensor problem, but no such luck because the dealer has not been able to duplicate the issue/noise (though everyone else who drives my car has).

    I talked to an independent mechanic who confirmed that the front brakes should wear out somewhat faster than the rears. Even the service person at my dealer admitted as much. Plus, the independent mechanic went on to say that if there is more than a 10 percent discrepancy between the rear brake pad wear and the front it is suggestive of a braking system or ABS problem. So my next question is this: If it is safe to assume that the thumping sound and the accelerated rear brake pad wear are related, who should be paying to replace the rear brakes under the circumstances (given that my reports of the rear brake thumping problem date back several years on my service records)?

    After all this — as you can tell by my lengthy post — I’m almost convinced I got a lemon for a car :0(. My Elantra has been in the shop 37 days not including the past week. As mentioned, I tried to go to another dealer but they didn’t want to work on a car with open-ended problems that were first reported to another dealer who was unable to fix them. So I'm back at the original dealer where I bought the car still trying to find answers. Meanwhile, I found out that I exceeded Lemon Law statute in my state (given that I’m over the 18 months or 18,000 miles reporting timeframe). So my final question is this: Does anyone know if I am still be eligible for Arbitration with Hyundai? Believe me, I’d rather get these problems fixed than file for arbitration but after five years I’ve gotten nowhere.

    Thanks for “listening” folks. I appreciate any tips you can provide to get my car fixed and my warranty honored.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    The easy solution to everyone else (including you) who drives the car being able to duplicate the brake noise but the dealer can't is, take the car to the dealer and YOU (or one of your friends who knows how to duplicate the noise) drive the car while the service tech listens.

    The brake wear is interesting. Before I sold my '01 GLS to my sister, I had the brakes checked. These are standard disc/drums. The fronts still had 85% left the rears 90% left, with 42,000 miles on the car. This is with mostly city driving over 5-1/2 years. 5-speed tranny. The fact your brakes are considerably more worn with less miles could point to a number of things, including different driving habits/patterns, but also potentially a brake problem.
  • doohickiedoohickie Posts: 949
    I can't offer much advice, but I have heard, from a Hyundai USA employee (not at a dealer, at the corporate office), that with the proportioning valve design on the Elantra, the rear brakes *do* in fact tend to wear out before the fronts. The valve is intended to distribute the brake force for most efficient braking, but the Elantra design tends to favor increased wear on the rears. It's a characteristic of the car.

    Most cars have the opposite tendency- that the rear brakes take much longer to wear than the fronts. I suppose Hyundai was trying to optimize this so they would wear out at the same time, and overcompensated a bit.
  • newsviewnewsview Posts: 33
    Wow, that is a pretty big discrepancy on brake pad wear. You would think I was speeding up to every red light I spotted. That's not true though. Speaking of which, with 20 percent on the rear brakes should I wait until it is down to 10 percent or so (maybe another year?). Or do you think I might stand a better chance of getting some of it covered under warranty if I change the rear brakes and brake fluid now and hope they spot the problem in the process? I'd like to reproduce the brake noise issue for the dealer but haven't had the luck so far (depsite the fact that it happens about every other day or so I drive the car). Thanks for the tip, though.
  • Has anyone experienced wiper linkage failures.
    I have 2 elantras, an 02 and an 03, as well as an 05 sonata.
    The 02 Elantra has had 2 linkages fail, causing the passanger side wiper not to move.
    Now, the second linkage WAS from a scrapyard, but even the motor was good, and still is.
    It is just frustrating to have this happen twice, and they are not repaireable!
    Any feedback?
    Thanks
  • newsviewnewsview Posts: 33
    Thanks for the tip, doohickie. I will keep it in mind. I'm not sure if a design-flaw is the culprit that's caused my rear brakes to need replacement so much quicker than the front brakes. On the flip side, I read a few similar posts describing premature rear brake pad wear caused by the parking brake — except those posts didn't report the thumping noise I hear.

    Since I have ABS and disc brakes on the rear of the car, perhaps a more general question would help me narrow down the possibilities. Has anyone ever heard of ABS being implicated in brake noise of any kind (not just on an Elantra, but in general)? I ask because an independent mechanic suggested my ABS could be engaging — but when ABS engage is it normal to actually hear the ABS kick in? I've heard of feeling it in the brake pedal — a pulsation of some sort — but I've never heard of hearing ABS activate. Since this is my first car with ABS, would someone with more experience owning and driving ABS-equipped cars care to comment?
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Good luck getting brake pads (a wear item) covered under warranty--just about any warranty, except maybe BMW's. I suppose there's a chance that if they can trace premature brake wear to a brake problem, they might cover the brake pads too, but I doubt it. Replacing brake pads after 30k miles is within a "normal" range, or at least that is what they will probably say. I've heard many people talk about replacing brake pads at similar mileage, though. I had to replace the rear brake shoes on a Caravan at 30k once.

    Although the brake noise problem is maddening to you, I hope you understand that if the dealer can't hear it/reproduce it, they are at a loss as to what to do with it. I've had that happen many times over my years of car ownership--a problem will mysteriously "go away" right before taking it to the dealer, or it won't occur in front of the dealer. :confuse:
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,805
    that with the proportioning valve design on the Elantra, the rear brakes *do* in fact tend to wear out before the fronts.

    Not to sure about that, still on the original back brakes with near 140K miles. Changed the fronts at least three times.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • newsviewnewsview Posts: 33
    You mentioned BMW backing their brakes under warranty. I know someone who drives a Subaru Outback — just under three years old (2004). The dealer took responsibility for an apparent design flaw. The car was "under braked" so it needs a complete set of brakes every six months or so. Yikes! As for Subaru, I don't know if they will be that helpful once the car is out of warranty. As for me, I've been so busy trying to get Problem No. 1 fixed that I haven't spent nearly enough time trying to drive a Hyundai tech around to listen for Problem No. 2. One of the major reasons they haven't duplicated the issue is that in five years my dealer has only let me speak directly to a tech about three times (and drive around with one in my car twice). Only on one occasion did the rear brake noise happen while the service manager was in the car on a test drive with me. But since the service manager was cornering the car and driving it around in circles in order to duplicate some creaks in the suspension, he said he hadn't heard or noticed the thumping from my rear brakes.

    I somewhat agree that it is time to pay for a set of brakes but my concern is that if they don't fix whatever caused the first set of rear brakes to wear down at double the rate of the front set of brakes, that it will just prematurely wear my next set of brakes, too. That's why I need to see if something is wrong first, instead of changing out the brakes first to see if it just clears up (which is what the dealer suggests). I think they'd rather me just pay it than find the problem because otherwise they might have a warranty claim on their hands instead of a brake job. I'm willing to pay for the parts if they can pick up the labor — assuming I can get them to find anything at all. (Not for lack of opportunity, though — the dealer has done all the tire rotations and most of the service, and always with my request for them to "check the rear brakes").

    My experience is that the service advisors always want to take the description of the sound/problem down and then have the tech drive around without me (after I leave and they have a free tech available to get to my car). Consequently, I'll be going back to the dealer this week to insist on driving around with a tech to see if I can duplicate the issue. Whether they hear it or not, though, I would think it would be pretty straightforward to check the shoes, pads, calipers and parking brake visually. (Though I could be wrong about how readily visible a brake problem would be upon inspection.)
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    One of the major reasons they haven't duplicated the issue is that in five years my dealer has only let me speak directly to a tech about three times (and drive around with one in my car twice).

    Therein lies a big part of the problem. You are the customer. If you want to talk with a service tech and ride in the car (even drive it) while they listen for a problem, that is your prerogative. Even the inept dealer I "fired" a couple of years ago had no problems with my talking to the service techs and going in the car (driving or riding) when in search of a problem.

    If I were you, I'd have a talk with the owner of the dealership. If that doesn't improve their attitude and service, look for another dealer.

    P.S. This particular brake problem may not have a visual cue. If it's related to the ABS, it could be due to a problem with the hydraulics or electronics.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    Regarding the brakes. On a '02 GLS, at 42K w/o abs the front pads were replaced, the rear drums were fine.

    On a '05 GT w/o abs, at 25K the front pads look great, the rear pads were less than 20% remaining. The rear pads are quite a bit smaller than the fronts, and are ORGANIC. I could not find a manufacurer that makes rear semi metallic pads for an Elantra. Fronts everbody makes, but all the rear pads are organic. And friends, organic pads will not last anything like a metallic.

    Jim
  • newsviewnewsview Posts: 33
    Wow, that's an eye opener, jlflemmons. Organic pads? Smaller, too? Assuming it holds true for the ABS model in 2001, I might have a better explanation than anything the dealer gave me. (The thumping might not be a brake wear issue after all, in that case.)

    And Backy's right, too. I've asked to speak to the techs and the service advisors typically say they are too busy and that because of insurance reasons I can't walk out to the service bays, either (does anyone else get that one?). I tried another dealer, over 30 miles away and they were friendly but didn't want to pick up the problems that the other dealer left unresolved. So I feel kind of trapped. Three other dealers that used to be in my geographic area have all closed now, so my choices are narrowing.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,805
    and that because of insurance reasons I can't walk out to the service bays, either (does anyone else get that one?).

    It is an insurance company issue, keep the customer outside the service area (an area where they are more likely to be hurt) and your insurance costs are kept down. Allow customers there and your rates skyrocket. One way to drive your insurance underwriter crazy is to have them see customers in the service bay area.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    One way around the insurance issue is to ask the service manager to escort you out to see the tech. I am lucky in that having grown up in a service dept., the shop lets me come back whenever I want. Shoot, I even helped one of the techs debug an electronics issue one morning!

    I may work in the high tech sector, but I am still a wrench wonk at heart.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,805
    One way around the insurance issue is to ask the service manager to escort you out to see the tech.

    Nope the insurance companies don't like that either. They want the customer completely out of there for liability issues.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    I wonder how NTB handles this. They have signs in all the stores I have been in stating customers are welcome in the shop. Having seen some of their screw-ups, I don't let them touch one of my cars unless I am standing right there.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,805
    Not sure, maybe their insurance company doesn't know, maybe they are paying the higher insurance rates.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • doohickiedoohickie Posts: 949
    that with the proportioning valve design on the Elantra, the rear brakes *do* in fact tend to wear out before the fronts.

    Not to sure about that, still on the original back brakes with near 140K miles. Changed the fronts at least three times.


    And you have a 2000 if I remember correctly. Lots of changes for the 2001 model year.
  • doohickiedoohickie Posts: 949
    One way around the insurance issue is to ask the service manager to escort you out to see the tech. I am lucky in that having grown up in a service dept., the shop lets me come back whenever I want. Shoot, I even helped one of the techs debug an electronics issue one morning!

    I may work in the high tech sector, but I am still a wrench wonk at heart.


    I second that. When my battery was replaced under warranty, the techs were busy. The service writer tested the battery and determined it was bad. While she went back to get a new battery, I got my wrenches out of the back and took out the old one. When she brought the new battery out, I popped it into the car and put it all back together. The whole process from when I pulled in to when I pulled out was probably about 15 minutes. I like a dealer that's flexible that way. And from the front of the shop, you can see all the bays anyway.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    I've been in the service area of my Hyundai dealer on two occasions. And, with my local SAAB-only dealer located in a very small town (pop. 600) in Indiana, they allow me not only to be in the service area, but also to help the tech work on the car - if so desired. I know the three techs at the SAAB dealer by their first names, not because of the need for consistent service, but simply because of their friendliness. Then again, this is an "old school" type of dealership which are few and far between these days.
  • wonderwallwonderwall Posts: 126
    yeah, that's probably the only downside of now owning the hyundai, both of the local dealers are part of auto sprawl marts, so to speak. when i had my mazda pr5, the dealership was a stand alone mazda shop and i always got the same team of guys who handled the maintenance on my car and they knew me by name and so on.
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