Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Honda CR-V Maintenance and Repair

1201202204206207227

Comments

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    Well I think as long as you are under warranty, you'd best go with the type of oil stated in your owner's manual or on the oil cap itself.

    You'll need a longer test to test oil consumption. You might have the dealer check your PCV valve, and also complain about oil consumption. Maybe there's a leak you can't see. At least the complaint will be recorded.

    Generally, there's no cause for alarm here unless you continue testing and find that the oil consumption in miles per quart is slowly increasing as the miles pile up. An engine can use some oil and run forever, but when it drops to say one quart per 1000 miles, that really gets my attention, especially on a newer vehicle.

    Next oil change, try to measure it very accurately. And make sure the dealer makes note of this on the repair order....and check the PCV system.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • lzclzc Posts: 483
    The beauty of Honda's system is that finally an automaker has incorporated the obvious in their service schedule recommendations: all mileage is not the same. I guess a 3,000 mile oil change interval makes sense if one assumes everyone drives under the worst conditions possible.

    But they don't. Some people drive mostly on freeways and at moderate speeds and live in an area with a mild climate. For them, a longer interval between oil changes makes sense. Honda's system attempts to account for these differences. It makes sense to me.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    I've always upgraded to 5W-30 weight vs the thinner weights

    Is there proof that "thicker is better"? Or is it just a personal preference?
  • trcmtrcm Posts: 4
    tomk17,
    Aren't you concerned that the switch to 5-30W will void Honda's warranty?
  • bearcrkrdbearcrkrd Posts: 167
    10,000 miles? No! 5,000 is ok. I don't go over that. Not sure about the first, but 3,000 -4,000 sounds right. Why would I buy a brand new vehicle and then do the first oil change (and second and third..) myself???
    You should always use the thinest possible oil your vehicle's engine will use. I'ts because of the close tolerances in the new motors. The oil needs to get to all parts of the motor immediately upon starting and remain there at full pressure at all times.
    The only vehicle I've had trouble with is an '01 Camry 4 cylinder. Started using oil at 60,000 miles. Treated it like my child, so it was doubly frustrating. It's got 135,000 now, and I'm going up (45 miles) after class this morning to check and probably add oil. My sister has it now. Cat converter hasn't gone yet, and it doesn't tick or knock. I changed the oil myself on that one, as it was easy enough for a fifth grader to do. But not the first few times.
    I spent $10 on a raffle ticket two weeks ago. Prize is a CRV EX. Drawing in November. Just checking to see what I could be in for :D
  • tomk17tomk17 Posts: 135
    At 115K miles, it's long past warranty so not a concern for me. I'll have to check but I think the 0W-20 was the suggestion for one wide temperature range and 5W-30 was acceptable for a higher temperature range (I don't have the manual in front of me).
  • terryp1terryp1 Posts: 55
    Gotta agree with blueiegod on the oil change. I still can't believe manufacturers are suggesting 10k between changes. After a few break-in changes at under 5k I switched to Mobil1 synthetic and now change it right at 5k. The stuff that comes out looks plenty used and dirty to me.

    And on the viscosity. I switched to 5w-30 early on but switched right back after mentioning it to a top-notch professional mechanic who has the same model CR-V. He says the engine's self-adjusting valves need the 5w-20.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    I think he means the variable valve timing perhaps? You can screw that up with the wrong weight oil.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 31,211
    Hondas used to need a valve adjustment, every 30K miles... That hasn't been the case for Accords or CR-Vs for at least ten years, though..

    Maybe that's what he meant by "self-adjusting".. :confuse:

    MODERATOR
    Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • dmacciocdmaccioc Posts: 13
    Hi-

    I just bought a new CR-V EX-L Friday night and overall really like the vehicle. I test drove the vehicle before buying and everything checked out. However, the next day, a rattling noise emerged from the sunroof area, and it doesn't matter whether the sunroof is closed, open, or cracked to "vent". I've pushed on the sunroof slightly and it seems to be very sturdy, so I don't know where the rattling is coming from.

    Has anyone had similar experiences? I am concerned because the sound is really distracting and not something I could deal with long-term on the car. I hope the dealer can fix it right the first time. Would love to know how it was fixed and if the problem came back.

    Thanks-
    Don
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,401
    Remember, synthetic oil does not break down.

    Yet today's modern oils are vastly improved over those of 20 years ago. For oils that meet the current "SJ" service designation, viscosity breakdown is no longer a significant problem, thanks to modern formulation technologies and viscosity enhancers. Auto manufacturers have also redesigned their engines for tighter clearances and instituted precision machining techniques that take advantage of thinner oil to deliver improved fuel economy through reduced friction.

    Like the OEMs, racers have discovered that friction reductions plus precision tight clearances yield greater efficiency and more power. Racers also know that most engine wear occurs at start-up, so it's critical that engine parts receive proper lubrication as soon as possible--hence the need for an initially thinner, so-called "winter" viscosity. Today, few racers run a single-viscosity motor oil except nitro-burners. According to 76 Lubricants, most NASCAR teams use the really thin stuff during qualifying, moving up to 20W-50 during the long race (although it's rumored some teams may use the extreme cold-weather thin oils all the time, but don't want to admit to their latest performance "trick").

    Synthetic oils, pioneered in the '70s by Mobil and now available from most major oil companies, take the all-season, multiviscosity approach to the outer limits. Unlike traditional mineral oils that are produced by distillation and further refining of existing crude oil stock, synthetic lubricants are made through chemical reactions. These new oils aren't synthetic or artificial in the sense that they're manufactured out of whole cloth--they still have the same natural ingredients found in "real" oil. But in a synthetic lubricant, these ingredients are recombined like a Lego set to yield synthesized-hydrocarbon molecular chains with desirable characteristics and uniformity not found in even the highest-quality traditional motor oils. Typically, the best synthetic oils use a combination of up to three different synthetic base fluids--polyalphaolefin (PAO), synthetic esters, and alkylated aromatics.

    Because a synthetic oil's molecules are much more consistent in size and shape, they are better able to withstand extreme engine temperatures. By contrast, the unstable molecules in conventional oil can easily vaporize or oxidize in extreme heat. Mobil 1 synthetic is said to be capable of protecting engines "at well over 400 degrees F"; in the real world, most racers have no problem running synthetics up to 290 degrees F under prolonged use, but they get really jumpy when a conventional exceeds 270 degrees F.

    Because a synthetic oil is chemically produced, there are no contaminants in the oil. By contrast, conventional oils contain small amounts of sulfur, wax, and asphaltic material that can promote detonation as well as varnish and sludge buildup. With no wax, synthetics will flow at much lower temperatures than conventional oils. In fact, synthetic oils are now available with viscosity ratings as low as 0W-30, as in Mobil 1's new Tri-Synthetic blend or Castrol Formula SLX. These oils flow more than seven times faster than a conventional 5W-30 motor oil during initial start-up, yet at normal operating temperatures act like a regular Grade 30 oil.

    An 0W-30 synthetic oil is capable of pumping easily at -62 degrees F and flowing at even lower temperatures. Conventional oils are essentially frozen solid at that temperature, so there's simply no conventional equivalent to this new grade. There are 5W-30 conventional and synthetic oils, but even here, the synthetic has a real-world advantage: Mobil 1's 5W-30 will pump at -58-degrees F, compared to about -35-degrees F for a conventional oil.


    Regards,
    OW
  • theodortheodor Posts: 1
    i just found the new CR-V service manual and share it for people who search for it
    its Honda CRV service manual 2007 2008 2009
    link part1
    link part2
    link part3
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    Remember, synthetic oil does not break down.

    Au Contraire. Synthetics do break down. But, because the molecule size distribution is more uniform (think of the bell shape distribution and 99% of the molecule sizes are within 0.5% either side of the median. They all break down at the same rate to the same size.

    There are no shorter chains that break down faster and longer chains that breakdown to individual molecules longer. shorter chains, once broken down are useless, and become junk inhibiting the still functioning longer chains from performing.

    Also, not all synthetics are truly synthetic oils with narrow molecule size distribution.

    Most of the so called synthetics are nothing more than highly purified conventional oils. They are processed through what is called "hydrockracking" or basically steaming.

    Mobil1(except for Extended Performance), Quaker state, Pennzoil, Castrol Syntec (except for 0W-40 or whichever is made in Germany), Valvoline Synthetic... are all FAUX synthetics.

    Mobil1 EP, Castrol Syntec (has to say: "Made in Germany"), Royal Purple, Amsoil (don't like their sales tactics) and a few others are still true synthetics.

    Since there is no price break when buying FAUX synthetics, make sure you buy true synthetic oils. Otherwise you are wasting your money.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,974
    My buddy that sells Amsoil told me that the molecular tails in it break within 3,000 miles too. I think you are just wasting your money putting synthetic in ordinary passenger cars to begin with.

    I almost got some synthetic the other day though. NAPA was out of 5w30 and the synthetic was on sale for almost as cheap as my usual flavor. But I went to WallyWorld and got a 5 quart jug of SuperTech for under $10.

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    Remember, synthetic oil does not break down.

    Au Contraire. Synthetics do break down. But, because the molecule size distribution is more uniform (think of the bell shape distribution and 99% of the molecule sizes are within 0.5% either side of the median. They all break down at the same rate to the same size.

    My buddy that sells Amsoil told me that the molecular tails in it break within 3,000 miles too. I think you are just wasting your money putting synthetic in ordinary passenger cars to begin with.


    Didn't I just say that?
    The difference is how synthetics breakdown. Lets say that all of the molecules in the oil are 86 monomers long. And you lose a monomer per 200 miles.

    All of the moluecules in synthetic oil will be 74 monomers long after 100 miles. The oil is still funcitonal.

    In the dyno oil, some of the molecules are 150 monomers long, and some are 30 molecules long. The short ones will lose 1/3 of their monomers in 1000 miles. After prolonged use, there will be a bunch of cooked up monomers form all the short chains that have disintegrated, and a bunch of now shortened formerly long molecules trying to perform. But, because of the overwhelming number of broken down monomeric species, the long molecules won't perform.

    Hope my layman's explanation gets to the point.

    I agree, that if one changes the oil on the regular basis, then dyno will suffice. But, if one were to be more environmentaly concious, and wanted to generate less pollution, and smaller carbon footprint (used oil is one of them) one could use higher quality oil and prolonged service intervals to achieve such goal.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,974
    Oil's better than it used to be and my intervals are 7,500 on dead dino. 15,000 mile intervals would be better but I don't drive that many miles a year, so I bump up on the time problem.

    If all else fails, check the owner's manual. :shades:

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • fussycrvownerfussycrvowner Posts: 179
    Too bad they don't charge a deposit for the used oil like they do in some states for cans and bottles. Recycling is a good alternative to dumping in the back yard and hoping it disappears. What happens to the used oil you take to the parts store anyway? ;)
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    Too bad they don't charge a deposit for the used oil like they do in some states for cans and bottles. Recycling is a good alternative to dumping in the back yard and hoping it disappears. What happens to the used oil you take to the parts store anyway?

    Someone would have to be really foolish these days to dump the oil in their back yard.

    A lot of oil changing places use used oil as heating oil in the winter. So, it just gets burned. National chains probably send it to recyclers which clean it up and make it into greases, lubricants, or other grades of oil.

    Problem with a lot of DIYer is that they would not think twice about mixing the oil with antifreeze or brake fluid and then taking it to the store for recycling.

    One problem I see with deposits on used oil, is the low-lives stealing oil from cars parked on the streets.

    I remember a few years back when I lived in the Bronx, there was a rash of catalytic converters being cut off from high sitting vehicles. It was easy for crooks to slide under the car, cut it off with a battery powered cut off tool and be on their way in a matter of minutes. They were selling them to scrap yards.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,974
    The county has curbside waste oil pickup here in Boise. I have 5 quarts sitting out right now. The used stuff gets re-refined into base stock for lubricating oil - oil doesn't really wear out. The parts stores and quick lube joints probably sell it.

    A deposit probably would keep a bunch of it out of the landfills.

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • fussycrvownerfussycrvowner Posts: 179
    "One problem I see with deposits on used oil, is the low-lives stealing oil from cars parked on the streets"

    Not to mention all of the service bulletins created addressing excessive oil consumption and missing drain plugs... :P
  • ohbaobeiohbaobei Posts: 19
    folks, i have got CRV April 11th.

    Last week, the tire pressure light is on and i checked manual and tires, found that there is one tire has very low pressure, only 25 psi. i have added air and the light went off. But after two days the light is on again and i checked the air pressure again, it is again 25 psi. So i decided to send the car to dealers and have them checked for me.

    But it is my first new car and I have no experience to deal with dealer service. I have the manufacture warranty, so does it cover the tire? do i need to pay for this service. As I understand, i should be under factory warranty, am I right?
  • mcdermottmcdermott Posts: 29
    Your Dealer should offer to re-mount and re-balance the wheel at no cost to you. Dealers in general seem to have no appreciation for the value of other peoples' time. Tell them you cannot afford to keep returning to the Dealer to repair faults that should not have happened to a new vehicle, and you want them to fix the offending wheel immediately.
  • ohbaobeiohbaobei Posts: 19
    folks, i have got CRV April 11th.

    Last week, the tire pressure light is on and i checked manual and tires, found that there is one tire has very low pressure, only 25 psi. i have added air and the light went off. But after two days the light is on again and i checked the air pressure again, it is again 25 psi. So i decided to send the car to dealers and have them checked for me.

    But it is my first new car and I have no experience to deal with dealer service. I have the manufacture warranty, so does it cover the tire? do i need to pay for this service. As I understand, i should be under factory warranty, am I right?
  • ohbaobeiohbaobei Posts: 19
    usually how often do you guys change oil? Do you follow the panel oil life or follow every 5000 (or 3000) miles?
  • bigdadi118bigdadi118 Posts: 1,207
    Follow the Maintenance Minder and the code(s) it indicate ...

    One to take note is change oil within 12 months if your mileage is low, not high enough to trigger the MM.
  • madrivermadriver Posts: 8
    You've probably figured this out already.....

    I have a 2008 CR-V (which replaced a 2000) and love it. I've occasionally heard a rattle in the car, but every time it turned out to be something like a pen on the center console, or my water bottle or my purse on the backseat - nothing wrong with the car itself, even though the noise may have echoed and sounded like it was coming from somewhere else. I just touch things until I find the place that stops the rattle. (And when it's my purse, which is the most elusive, I pull over to fix it because I can't stand that noise)
  • lzclzc Posts: 483
    >>i should be under factory warranty, am I right?

    Right. While tire warranties are generally separate from the car manufacturer's warranty, your dealer will honor it. Assuming the problem is a defective tire or valve stem, your dealer will take care of the problem free of charge. But if the leak is caused by a nail, that's another matter.
  • trcmtrcm Posts: 4
    Don,
    I have an '07 CR-V EX-L with a similar rattling (or buzzing) noise, which appears to come from the area immediately behind the sunroof, near the head lamp. When I press that area of the headliner it stops. It is not a consistant noise, but appears to come and go. It is most noticable when the vehicle is in drive gear ("D") and ideling. If I had to guess, I'd say it is a wire (or similar) within the hearliner, near the headlight.

    I took it to the local Honda dealer and asked it they have ever had this complaint. Of course, they said "no." Because it's not critical, I'm reluctant to have them tear it apart to look; the vehicle will never be the same once they did that!

    I would appreciate it if you'd let me know if you learn more about it!
  • tornadogtornadog Posts: 49
    Bought my 08 crv in december 2007. Of late I have been noticing bad smell from the ac ducts when I start the car in the morning. It usually lasts a few minutes till the air starts circulating, but of late its becoming longer. its kind of ammonia-ish smell. Other thing is I feel my ride to be very bumpy. Even on freshly laid roads, i can feel every small bump. i remember it used to be much better. Also on turns the car feels kinda wobbly and I almost fear it will topple over if i didnt brake fully. Another thing is, my MM has not come on since I bought it. Its been 18 months and 17000 miles. my oil life is at 40% and whenever i call the dealer they ask me to wait till it goes to 15%. I am taking it to the dealer today. what can i expect? I am not a car person, so help me understand why these 2 problems r happening?
Sign In or Register to comment.