Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Honda CR-V Maintenance and Repair

1308309311313314340

Comments

  • tomk17tomk17 Posts: 135
    Both low beam headlights went out on my 04 CRV. I replaced both bulbs, checks both under-hood headlight fuses, AND swapped out the headlight relays (also in the under-hood fuse panel) with 2 others of the same p/n that were in the panel. Still no luck - calling the dealer today to see if there is something I'm missing. Any help appreciated !!
  • At first I didn't use the shelf much. Now I find I use it quite often. When shopping and going to multiple stores along with grocery shopping, I put the heavier items on the floor, and put the lighter, bulkier items on top(TP and PT). I can really pack the rear full that way. Also, unloading items bought for my daughter, they can be put on top and taken out, without going through the whole area.

    I also saw your oil change thread. Honda says to let the first oil stay in for the long period of time. I did that, and now use synthetic oil and follow their service intervals.
    I'll follow their advice. 2007 CRV
  • lzclzc Posts: 483
    You are going to get widely different opinions on this. Some people actually think Honda's recommendations are part of a conspiracy to generate more repair business. There's not much one can say about that.

    My grandfather thought oil should be changed at 1,500 miles. My father is sure 3,000 is right. Both won't recognize that oils and engines have improved, making longer oil change intervals appropriate.

    I've always followed the automakers recommendations. I keep my cars 10-15 years. Not one has suffered from premature excess oil consumption or other oil-related problems.

    Honda knows their engines better than any of us shade tree mechanics. And, yes, the oil in your new car is a break-in oil that will help your engine last longer. Don't dump in down a drain until it's completed its job. Good luck.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 39,989
    Everybody knows that Honda uses special "break-in" oil and Honda says not to change the oil early to maximize engine performance. Check your owner's manual.

    "New oil has chemicals that eat away the catalytic converter, says Donny Seyfer, a Colorado-based certified master technician, and changing oil too often can damage that pricey part."

    The Great Car Maintenance Upsell (Yahoo/Smart Money)

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    yes definitely get that oil changed before 10,000 miles. I would definitely change the oil at what you're used to at 3500 miles. You'll get some people on here who support Honda's thinking, and I think it's a cruel joke by Honda just to guarantee future service business by suggesting such long changes. Some will also tell you that oil changes at 3500 miles are "wasteful" of the earth's resources.
    Funny it's not a waste since they actually recycle oil. Plus it's not their car, it's yours!

    so to summarize, yes get that oil changed every 3500 or the old honda interval was 3750, fit nicely into 7500, then 15,000 miles for all the normal maintenance timings.

    And when you do go to the dealer it's important for you to check the oil level on the dipstick, make sure they didn't overfill it! I keep seeing that a lot at dealers, and don't let them tell you it's ok, because it's not. If it is over filled, make them drain it til it's within the max and min (closer to max) hope that helps!


    Wouldn't the used oil analysis be the definitive answer? And accodring to the posted oil tests the K-series engines are very easy on the oil, and 10,000 miles on Group II (pure dinasaur juice) seems OK.
  • Does anyone know if I was ripped off? The blower stops working in my 2004 LX. The shop tells me that the a/c control head is out. I ask if they tested the blower motor and the blower resistor and they tell me that both are operational. The repair happens. When I pick the car up, they tell me that once the control head was replaced, the blower resistor was not working properly so that was replaced as well. Does this make sense? Was the resistor working and an add-on repair? Was the resistor the problem and the control head an add-on? Did they just do the diagnosing improperly? Any input would be appreciated...
  • I found the parcel shelf could be useful, if the larger objects are the right size. For me, our stroller it too big to fit under the shelf. On long trips however, I might place the stroller on top, and luggage under the shelf, which would best maximize the space.... like having 2 trunks in one. The overall footprint of hte trunk is about the same size as our Altima, but of course you can ple stuff a lot higher, its' easier to load, and a lot bigger and more vesitile wiht hte seats folded forward.

    As for oil changes. I agree, follow the maintenance minder or change after 12 months if your a low mileage driver like me. You might however, want to change the oil the first time 12 months from the MFG date, not the date you took delivery... or specifically 12 months from when it first started being operated.

    I used to change my oil at 5000 or 6 months, but I'm starting to think that was probably overkill.
  • Hi. I am new to the forum and have a question about my husbands CRV. His car failed inspection for emissions. The code was P1166 which apparently is the O2 sensor. I am more than willing to replace it myself since Honda wants a ridiculous amount of money to do it. I know I will need an O2 socket, but my question is this: Is there any way to tell which O2 sensor is bad? There are 2 and I don't want to replace the wrong one. Any help would be appreciated as well as any advice on how to go about the actual replacement. This will be my first ever attempt at auto repair!

    Thanks
    Christine
  • Consider getting a service manual. I believe it can be checked with a multimeter. As with any sensor, either the resistance or voltage needs to be checked. If it's pegged at a minimum or maximum voltage or resitance reading while the engine is running, it's probably a good indication it's bad.

    Otherwise a scan tool might be able to interface with the computer and tell you which of the 2 sensors is giving an out of range reading.

    If you have no idea what I'm talking about...then you're relegated to being a "parts changer", and you can buy 1 new sensor, take a 50/50 shot to see if the problem is fixed. If not, swap sensors again.
  • mark19mark19 Posts: 123
    sounds about normal for 90% at 700 miles. But remember that monitor is set up for 10,000 mile intervals. 10% = 700 miles X 10 intervals = 7,000 miles (100% used). See how close it really is?

    And I love the urban myth that Honda uses "special break in" oil. No one has ever proven that is true at all. But I usually change the oil at around 1000 miles regardless of what the owner's manual says. I had a couple of honda's before that I listened to the oil change recommendations and didn't change the oil at 1000 miles, the fuel economy wasn't as good then as it was on the one I did the first oil change at 1000 miles.

    But if you don't want to change the oil at 1000, then definitely at 3000 miles you should change it out. Then after that like you wanted around 3500-3750 miles.
    and you're welcome for the help!
  • I agree taht it's a urban myth. Most point ot higher level of moly in oil samples taken. But that is most likely from the assembly grease used when the engine is assembled. it has an extremely high moly content to protect the components parts during the first start-up before oil makes it through all the passage ways and it fully bled. Also, it's nessesary to rotate some engine parts during assembly and for some of the engine tests performed before it's installed.

    Theres simply no need for a special oil. In modern engines, there's not a whole lot of break-in that actually occurs after the first 2 or 3 miles... which are done at the factory.
  • Thanks motoguy. I have a pretty good idea what you mean. I am not a mechanic by trade (stay at home mom actually) but I can read and I am handy so I am not totally lost! I spoke with a friend of mine who has an OBD I can borrow, but I am thinking I will change both anyway, since the car has 114,000 miles on it. I will most likely recoup the money for the second one on what he makes up in gas mileage.

    Thanks!
    Christine
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 39,989
    And I love the urban myth that Honda uses "special break in" oil.

    That's why I (and most people) put it in quotes. But it does have high moly content from the build and Honda must think it provides some benefits because everywhere you look, Honda recommends not changing it early.

    Who knows engines better than Honda?

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • lzclzc Posts: 483
    >>And I love the urban myth that Honda uses "special break in" oil. No one has ever proven that is true at all.

    Isn't an "urban myth" a rumor that gets accepted by many as the truth? In this case, we have no rumor. Honda says they use a special break-in oil. It recommends leaving that oil in the car until the first scheduled oil change. That's not a rumor. It's a fact.

    You're right, though, about one thing. I haven't actually proven that Honda is telling the truth. First, I trust them not to lie about something like this, and, second, I suspect if they did, one of the auto testing outfits would enjoy very much exposing such a lie. So far, none have.

    But one thing is for sure, no one here is likely to change their mind about the appropriate frequency of oil changes. Good luck to all.
  • Christine:
    Just in case this might help, the trouble code reads like this:

    "P1166 Primary H02S (No. 1) Heater System Electrical"

    Wish I could offer more, but I'd be the blind leading the blind.

    Cheers,

    Jack
  • I think the main concern from the Honda engineers is that fresh oil won't allow as much engine wear. So it's desireable to leave it in for a longer period to finish doing it's job. I'm still not convinced it's a special formulation. If it is, it's only special is the what level of the typical additives or friction modifiers are included.

    That being said, Honda loves to sell you THEIR fluids it seems more than most other companies. In the motorcycle world, it's not uncommon for other manufacturers and dealers to use Honda grease for routine services such as lubricating drive shaft splines or during engine re-assembly.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    I am planning on buying a CR-V EX-L w/o Nav.
    I spoke to a salesperson at Coral Springs Honda who wanted $6K down and 400.00 per month for lease and 7.8K down and 400.00 per month to buy.
    I thought the guy must think I am an idiot so I left.
    Anyone recently purchased a car like this one in this area and how much did you pay?
    Thanks


    It is common on Hondas with digital HVAC controls to have the voltage regulating transistor to fail. The dealer charges about $70 for the module. The replacement is probably an hour of labor, or free if you do it your self. Some have just soldered a replecement transistor into the existing circuit board for $10.

    So, yes, it does sound like the shop misdiagnosed the problem. Honda shop manual lists self test procedure for the HVAC controller (control head in your case). It is fairly simple and does not require special tools.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    Hi. I am new to the forum and have a question about my husbands CRV. His car failed inspection for emissions. The code was P1166 which apparently is the O2 sensor. I am more than willing to replace it myself since Honda wants a ridiculous amount of money to do it. I know I will need an O2 socket, but my question is this: Is there any way to tell which O2 sensor is bad? There are 2 and I don't want to replace the wrong one. Any help would be appreciated as well as any advice on how to go about the actual replacement. This will be my first ever attempt at auto repair!

    I am pretty sure 1166 is the primary O2 sensor. The shop manual should have it listed, or google it.
  • I have EXACTLY the same problem. Any suggestions as to a resolution to the problem? Thank you!
  • tomk17tomk17 Posts: 135
    Solved - went to dealer today, the stalk / combo switch (headlights and turn signals) had arched and shorted out. Tech indicated it is a common problem often seen on CIVICs but the first he had seen on a CRV. They have a connector kit for the Civic that fit the CRV. Connector kit need to adapt to new switch. Replaced stalk (combo switch p/n 7743875-35999) for total cost of $240. Stinks but I rarely had a problem with this vehicle so at 125K miles, I'm OK with it.
Sign In or Register to comment.