Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Dodge Neon problems

jjeffersonjjefferson Posts: 1
edited March 5 in Dodge
Has anyone who owns a 2000 neon had problems with noises in the steering wheel?

Comments

  • My daughter had a "groaning noise when turning wheel" on her 2000 Neon.It's due to a new power steering pump neck they changed for 2000.The fix is to slightly overfill it past the "full" mark on the dipstick.I did this and its been over 25k miles ago and the noise has not returned.The pump reservoir is slightly too small but by just overfilling it slightly its fine.
  • yositoyosito Posts: 55
    You better go right now to your dealer and INSIST they HAVE TO replace the power steering.
    They have to get a new pump, and a new steering(ALL OF IT).
    and in some cases the steering column ALSO!

    Plus they have to install an OIL COOLER to the steering1.
    All´01 Neons comes with the cooler because of the problem on earlier Neons; Chrysler knows about the problem, BUT they won´t tell the customer until he complains!!!
    Outside America ALL neons were returned to dealer to replace all the steering components, because over there they don´t have so ,many hifgways and if the Neon is used where people demand more of the power steering, the steering fails, it produces some kind of noises, driving the car on bad roads, so go and insist on the replacement.

    Do it on time!

    PS Same is happening with Stratus and Sebrings ´01 sedans, they have the same problems.
  • gslevegsleve Posts: 183
    very well apply:

    Power Steering Noise

    There is a problem with some 1995 to 1999 Dodge, Chrysler and Plymouth cars. When ambient temperatures are low (10ºF and below) excessive noise is generated in the power steering system after the vehicle is started and the colder it gets the more annoying the noise and vibration gets. In extreme situations the power steering pump or the drive belt can be permanently damaged. The problem is the Power Steering OEM Fluid designated as MS-5931. The cure is complete drain of the system and replacement with better quality fluid such as DaimlerChrysler Part Number #05010304AA
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    19-05-00
    SUBJECT:
    Low Speed Power Steering Moan
    OVERVIEW:
    This bulletin involves the replacement of the power steering reservoir cap. The new power steering reservoir cap has an internal pressure relief valve and a revised dip-stick.
    MODELS:
    2000 - 2001 (PL) Neon
    NOTE: THIS BULLETIN APPLIES TO VEHICLES BUILT PRIOR TO MAY 24, 2000 (MDH
    0524XX).
    SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
    A moan type sound may be heard during low speed steering wheel inputs at low engine RPM (low speed turns or parking lot maneuvers).
    DIAGNOSIS:
    Drive the vehicle slowly through the parking lot and make slow speed turns, if the power steering moan is heard, perform the Repair Procedure.
    PARTS REQUIRED:
    1 05066063AA Cap, Power Steering Reservoir
    1 05010304AA Power Steering Fluid (MS-9933)
    REPAIR PROCEDURE:
    WARNING:THE POWER STEERING CAP SHOULD ONLY BE REMOVED WITH THE ENGINE OFF TO PREVENT PERSONAL INJURY FROM MOVING PARTS.
    1. Before opening the power steering system, wipe the reservoir filler cap free of dirt and debris.
    2. Remove the cap and discard.
    3. Install the new cap and use the new dip-stick to check the fluid level. Check the fluid when it is at normal ambient temperature, approximately 21°C to 27°C (70°F to 80°F), the dip stick level should be right at the FULL mark. Correct the fluid level as needed, do not overfill the power steering system.
    --------------------------------------------------
    19-07-99
    SUBJECT:
    Power Steering Moan Noise
    OVERVIEW:
    This bulletin includes information to diagnose and repair a power steering noise by removing air from the system.
    MODELS:
    2000 (PL) Neon
    SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
    Power steering moan can be described as a low frequency noise emitted by the steering system with steering wheel inputs at low engine RPM(low speed turns, parking maneuvers).
    Although some noise is normally present during these conditions, moan is brought to an unacceptable level when the power steering fluid is aerated. A low fluid fill causes the aerated fluid.
    DIAGNOSIS:
    With the engine running and the power steering reservoir cap removed, aerated fluid will have a foamy, or "champagne" appearance due to air bubbles. To alleviate this condition, the air trapped in the steering system has to be removed by conducting a bleed. Diagnosis/Repair is
    dependent on the power steering fluid being at the proper level within the power steering reservoir. Fluid fill is to be checked with the engine off and at normal ambient temperature, approximately 21° C to 27° C (70° F to 80° F). The proper, or recommended, fluid level in the reservoir should be:
    a. At the "HOT" letters, if the dipstick reads "HOT-COLD-ADD" at normal ambient temperature; or
    b. At the "FULL" mark, if the dipstick reads "FULL-ADD" at normal ambient temperature.
    c. Fill the power steering system to the recommended level at normal ambient temperature with new fluid (MS-9933). If the moan is still apparent or the fluid appears aerated, perform the Repair Procedure.
    EQUIPMENT REQUIRED:
    Vacuum Pump
    Bleeding With A Vacuum Pump:
    1. Remove the power steering fluid cap. DO NOT START THE VEHICLE UNTIL STEP 5.
    2. Lift the front wheels off the ground just enough to allow the wheels to be turned side to side without friction. Cycle the steering wheel lock to lock three times.
    3. Check the fluid level in the reservoir and fill to the proper level if needed.
    4. Apply 15 - 20 in Hg vacuum (do not exceed 20 in Hg) to the power steering system at the reservoir neck for five minutes. Remove vacuum.
    5. Start engine and slowly turn the steering wheel lock-to-lock for 10 cycles while maintaining approximately 2000 rpm (+/-150) engine speed (Do not hold steering against the lock, end-of-travel, position.).
    6. After 10 cycles, allow the engine to idle for 3 minutes before shutting it off.
    7. Lower the vehicle.
    8. Check the fluid level. If needed, fill the reservoir to the recommended position.
    Bleeding Without A Vacuum Pump.
    1. DO NOT START ENGINE UNTIL STEP 4. Fill the power steering system to the recommended level at normal ambient temperature with new fluid (MS-9933). Leave cap off.
    2. Lift the front wheels off the ground just enough to allow the wheels to be turned side to side without friction. Cycle the steering wheel lock to lock three times.
    3. Review fluid level in reservoir and fill to the proper level if needed.
    4. Start engine and slowly turn the steering wheel lock-to-lock for 10 cycles while maintaining approximately 2000 rpm (+/-150) engine speed (Do not hold steering against the lock, end-of-travel, position.).
    5. After 10 cycles, allow the engine to idle for 3 minutes before shutting it off.
    6. Lower the vehicle.
    7. Check the fluid level. If needed, fill the reservoir to the recommended position.
    --------------------------------------------------
    19-02-99 Rev. A
    SUBJECT:
    Clunking Or Rattle In Steering Wheel/Steering Column
    OVERVIEW:
    This bulletin involves resetting the steering column preload.
    MODELS:
    1995 - **2000** (JA) Breeze/Cirrus/Stratus
    1996 - **2000** (JX) Sebring Convertible
    1995 - 2000 (PL) Neon
    SYMPTOM/CONDITION:
    Steering wheel/column clunking or rattle is more frequent while hitting bumps or on hard turns.
    DIAGNOSIS:
    Inspect steering wheel/column for any rattle or clunking noise. If symptoms exist perform the Repair Procedure.
    PARTS REQUIRED:
    1 05015627AA Bolt, Steering Gear Coupler Retaining, PL
    1 **06506112AA Bolt, Steering Gear Coupler Retaining, JA/JX**
    1 **06036212AA Clip, Steering Gear Coupler Retaining, JA/JX**
    REPAIR PROCEDURE:
    NOTE: THE VEHICLE WHEELS NEED TO BE ON THE GROUND (SUPPORTING
    VEHICLE WEIGHT) WHEN PERFORMING THIS REPAIR.
    1. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative cable.
    2. If the vehicle is equipped with a tilt steering column, adjust to the full up position.
    3. Detach the lower steering column intermediate shaft from the steering gear shaft. This allows the steering column preload to reset.
    4. Re-attach the intermediate shaft to the steering gear using a new pinch bolt from the Parts Required section of this bulletin. Tighten the bolt to 27 N· m (240 in. lbs.).
    5. Install the retaining clip/pin into the pinch bolt.
    NOTE: A NEW STEERING GEAR COUPLING PINCH BOLT MUST BE USED WHEN
    RE-ATTACHING THE INTERMEDIATE SHAFT TO THE STEERING GEAR. THIS BOLT
    HAS A LOCKING PATCH THAT IS DESTROYED WHEN THE NUT IS REMOVED.
  • ems1ems1 Posts: 48
    Looks like Chrysler still has not worked out the head gasket problem with the Neons. Took mine to the dealer with an oil leak. They found the head gasket was bad. Fortunately still under warrantee with 32,000 miles.
  • I finally got rid of my 2000 neon. I had it for only 19,000 miles. During that time I had to replace the battery 3 times, the brake rotors were rotated twice, then finally replaced, the driver door had to be adjusted because it leaked in the rain, the power steering motor made a horrendous sound (they said just top off the reservoir every month),and the head gasket leaked and had to be replaced. The car also developed more rattles than all the cars I've ever owned combined (I've owned 10 cars before this). I finally decided to dump the car after I had a blowout and nobody in the Austin, Texas area stocked the tire type (P185 60R15, made only by Goodyear). I had enough with this citrus product and traded it in on a Honda Accord, at a big financial loss. Can't understand why nobody will buy a Neon. I have now sworn off Dodges for sure and maybe ever buying another Detroit product.

    Did I mention that the car also had to be brought in twice for safety recalls?
  • I hate saying it to all those that bought Neons but it is one of the most unreliable cars produced.
  • snowmansnowman Posts: 540
    I simply disagree. We have 2000 Neon and it is running like a swiss clock. Perhaps you might wanna read accord problems topic to get a good grip.
  • Just keep telling yourself that snowman. That so-called Swiss clock will end up like a Mongolian watch. Consumer Reports gave the Neon one of the worst ratings in the April auto issue for reliability. Hope you get 40K out of it.
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    I hate saying it to all those that bought Neons but it is one of the most unreliable cars produced.
    You evidently have never owned a Chevy Vega.
    Problems such as the Neon has is nothing new, eve Mustangs had their problems with the 3.8L engine.
    Geo Metros eat exhaust valves like candy.
    The list goes on and on.
  • Not that I am a huge fan of Dodge, but the Accord has had problems with its recent automatic transmissions and many new model Civics have been stalling during brake depression. Maybe it is workmanship, but Honda has seemed to have gone done a bit lately in quality/reliability. Also, when you pay thousands less, hopefully, you won't expect a Neon to be AS reliable as a Civic. If you really want to see UNRELIABLE perhaps you should check out the Honda Passport, I know it is a rebadged Isuzu, but look at how much Honda cares about it's customers.
  • Pardon my illiteracy, but I meant to say the workmanship has gone "DOWN" not "DONE", I was so distracted by the negative marks for the Passport, I forgot to proof-read my remarks.
  • snowmansnowman Posts: 540
    I used to be big time Honda owner. Last one I drove was 2000 Accord LX. I drove Civic(93), Accord(89,91)for more than 9 years.

    Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans... are no longer different than their American counterparts.

    Unlike Civic or Accord owners, complaints are very limited for new generation Neons.
    How many dissatisfied civic-accord owners versus Neon-Intrepid owners?

    Personally, I would not buy a car based on CR. I don't find their statements that much reliable.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,851
    I just think it will take some time -- and a longer track record of quality -- for the Neons to gain credibility as a reliable alternative to the same class foreign cars.

    If the new generation Neons are good, it could be several years down the road before Dodge see sales jump as a result of the quality.

    kirstie_h
    Roving Host
    Edmunds.com

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? kirstie_h@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • snowmansnowman Posts: 540
    I can't agree all the way. Sales figures are affected by many factors. Quality is one of them but I think it's share is not big enough to show up on yearly reports.
    For example; Mazda Protege is very good car however sales volume is very low ( at least I don't see them in traffic).
    Big majority of people get affected by each other when they select cars. Thats why every where covered by SUVs even thoug owners don't carry or pull anything.
    Ordinary drivers are not capable of measuring the quality because of limited samples in pool (one good car does not mean anything like one bad one does not mean anything). Even tough they attemp to measure it, results are not going to be reliable. Like, a driver keeps his feet on the brake pedal and cause excess wear or does not know how to apply then causes rotor replacement. This experiment will register as quality related issue in his mind. Later he will tell his friend not to buy such car.
    These days quality measured by organizations and dictated to consumers by media.

    I believe big portion of car buyers are motivating themselves that Hondas are always good. They used to be very good cars. Not lately though.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,851
    A good reputation is hard to shake, just as a bad reputation is!

    kirstie_h
    Roving Host
    Edmunds.com

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? kirstie_h@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • mobaymobay Posts: 45
    I've had a 2000 ES 5SP since May 2000. The car was Mfg on Tuesday Sept 22 1999.Got that info from runnng the VIN.

    I've lived most of my life outside of the USA and the Neon is the first US car I have ever owned. I've owned mostly Japanese and German makes.

    I'm very please with mine.I did however learn that the Auto is a dog from a Brit who knew about the 1st gens. I primarily bought the car for it's performace, which with the few mods I've made is nothing less than stellar. Mine has been tight,reliable,comfortable and relativily trouble-free (during the winter the brakes squeal).I paid a total of $14,500 for everything but the sunroof and engine block heater. I may get burned later, but it's made me rethink my opinion on Yank cars.

    It was quite hard to get a 5SP with ABS and TRAC though, dunno why, but mine had to come from N. Carolina.

    just an opinion and "one man's experience with his Neon" Take it at that.
  • 3mta33mta3 Posts: 2
    I have a 2000 Neon with 24,700 miles. I noticed a small coolant leak puddle underneath my car. Upon further investigation, i discovered the coolant leaks were coming from the oil pan. On the oil pan, there are "ridges" that run along the face thats parallel to the ground. Do these
    ridges contain antifreeze? Its a hair line crack and slow leak, but its still a leak. Any comments on this would be appreciated.
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    No, there is no coolant that runs thru the pan, those are only fins to help with heat dissipation.
    More than likely, you have a smaller leak that is running down from somewhere and since the pan is the lowest point, it collects there.
    I'd be thinking that the leak is coming from the water pump inlet tube. Right where the lower radiator hose connects is a tube, it goes into the back of the water pump, it uses an o-ring to seal it and it is quite possible the o-ring is seeping. The other thought is a loose hose clamp or a leaking water pump.
  • 3mta33mta3 Posts: 2
    Thanks Opatience for your responce. So my question is, those fins that are used to dissapate heat does not have "coolant" running throught them right? Its weird because i have wiped off the area where the leak is coming from, as soon as i wipe it off, antifreeze appears right away on the oil pan area where the "hairline" crack is. The surrounding area is dry. I see no leaks running down to wear the leak appears. Due to the cold weather here, and snow today, i've been waiting to "jack" the car up and 100% verify any leaks dripping down to that area. Will check the area you talked about. Thank you.
This discussion has been closed.