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Help Me Choose!

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Comments

  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,225
    Agree with Benjimin on all counts. The '08-'12 Accord wasn't the greatest and the '13 seems to really move the bar up to Honda level IMHO. I too would take a '13 over '12 regardless of model comparison.
  • tamtlytamtly Posts: 10
    Thanks Benjamin and Sebring.
  • benjaminhbenjaminh Posts: 1,623
    Consider trying the site

    Carwoo.com

    You put in the exact model and color you want, and get offers from dealers within 50 mi or so. You can negotiate. You should be able to get at least $2500 off any model of 2013 Accord. They are making a lot of them, and so if you closest dealer doesn't want to deal, move to one that really wants your biz.
  • benjaminhbenjaminh Posts: 1,623
    edited July 2013
    EX adds: 17" Alloy wheels, V-rated tires, Power Moonroof, Smart Entry/Push button start, Lane Watch, deluxe fabric seats, fog lights, heated side mirrors with turn signal indicators, 2 more speakers for the stereo, driver and passenger auto up/down windows, lockable glove box, etc.

    EX CVT lists for $25,405+790 destination
    LX CVT lists for $22,480+790

    I'd say the Moonroof is worth about a thousand, the upgraded wheels and tires are worth maybe 600, the smart entry/push button start is worth maybe 800, the lane-watch 800, and the other stuff maybe a 600 more. So it seems worth the $3000 difference, but none of this stuff is absolutely essential if you want or need to save some money.
  • tamtlytamtly Posts: 10
    edited July 2013
    Anyone know if the rear vent in Accord EX is of any good, especially in TX summer ? That's one feature that I find interesting in EX. I can live without the other features.
  • benjaminhbenjaminh Posts: 1,623
    Yes, the rear vents work. My kids report that the rear vent helps in hot weather. We live in KY, which is pretty hot sometimes.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    I'm going to add nothing to your list, but I will recommend based upon sad experience - stay away from the following:

    The Geo Metro, ANY Volkswagens, and the Chevrolets.
  • e1314e1314 Posts: 1
    hi, there, congrets and welcome to this torum, i got a car but not the same as you, i have been longing for a new car like yours,have a good day and good luck! :)
  • Do not buy the Hyundai Elantra. I bought the 2013 I fill up every three days with 22MPG. Hyundai lied. There is a lawsuit going on.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    We averaged 40mpg in our road trip to NYC from Birmingham, AL last year (in a 2012 GLS with four people on board). Best tank was 41, worst was 38.3.

    What are your driving conditions to get 22?
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,707
    One and only one thing matters here, and that's age. Almost any car built after 2000 will be decently reliable for a first car. So the trick is to see what you can get for that much money.

    1 - Put that $2500 down on something better and make payments. Unless you have garbage credit, that's at least a $5-$10K car. That gives you real options. $2500 will get you a bucket of problems and nothing good. In fact, if you have $2500 and that's it, you need to be looking at old semi-classic or classic cars, hopefully something that is pre-smog so that it's screwdriver and a wrench simple to fix. Modern cars since about 1990 are simply too full of electronics and sensors and other idiocy to be good past about 15 years. One throttle position sensor goes out and it's $250 to fix. Then there's tires, a possible transmission, things like water pumps, and so on. A 15-20 year old vehicle is penny wise and pound foolish as the adage goes.

    Classic cars are the only exception to this rule.

    2 - Your best bet will be cars that are over-built and have image or dealership problems. Anything by Pontiac comes to mind immediately because the brand is gone. There's nothing wrong with the Grand Prix, for instance. It just isn't new or exciting and all of that. So you can find them for almost nothing. Reliability is fine if you get one with the 3.8L engine, which was a mainstay of the GM fleet.

    Buick, Ford, and other domestics also are good bets. Don't be afraid of a rental car, either, if it's in good shape and is a big boat. You can't kill a Crown Vic, for instance, short of driving it 250K miles as a taxi or as a police car. Buick is also a good brand, btw.

    3 - Look at what you relatives have and consider possibly buying one of their old vehicles. You can skip smog and taxes with a family transfer. This can give you more money and a usable history as well, so IF you must drive a beater, at least it's not a total surprise.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    ((( 2 - Your best bet will be cars that are over-built and have image or dealership problems. Anything by Pontiac comes to mind immediately because the brand is gone. There's nothing wrong with the Grand Prix, for instance. It just isn't new or exciting and all of that. So you can find them for almost nothing. Reliability is fine if you get one with the 3.8L engine, which was a mainstay of the GM fleet. )))

    Mitsubishi comes to mind if you don't like the American offerings; a Galant can be had for next-to-nothing due to the brand perception in the US.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    All true - but, if it matters, and it may not - resale will be similarly difficult and low.
  • suydamsuydam Posts: 887
    Resale value -- for a car you bought for under $2500 -- Not a consideration. Any car that runs by then is a bargain. Main factor would be cheap parts because you will be replacing some. So old Buicks, Toyota Corollas, etc a good bet -- anything where the same parts have been used for ages and are widely available.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    True. Old Buicks and Cadillacs are a real bargain. Many are garage babies owned by older folks, low mileage, well maintained, and they depreciate like crazy. They are terrific bargains, if the person will drive such a beast.
  • igozoomzoomigozoomzoom Waleska, GeorgiaPosts: 790
    People always overlook SATURN, even before they went out of business! The mid-size L-series can be a very good, safe, cheap car but only with the 4-cylinder- the V6 (shared with Caddy Catera) can be a hellish nightmare!

    The '07-'09 Saturn AURA was and is a great car- it's a twin to the Malibu, but better looking inside and out.

    The '05-'07 VUE compact SUV can also be a great used buy if you stick with FWD and the V6 (a Honda-supplied 3.5L).

    The '09-'13 Mazda6 is one of the best cars that nobody bought??? So they can be a steal used, but avoid ones that have been rental cars.

    The '06-'10 Hyundai Sonata and Hyundai Azera are both great deals and the '07-'10 KIA Optima is also a great car, but ABS was optional and I wouldn't buy a car without it.
  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,579
    I drove a '12 Mazda6 last week and was very impressed with the way it drove...very smooth and the engine begs to be driven! Even my co-worker, who I whizzed by, commented about how fast I was going and I just told him the combo of the engine and the accelerator just begged to be floored...which I did! Just can't wait to get one of these puppies on an extended trip as I drove one up from Miami airport to Lauderdale airport which is only about 20 miles or so, not nearly long enough to enjoy such a vehicle. Personally, I enjoy the longer trips that we take because once I get comfortable in something, I'd rather drive for awhile but lately, many of our gigs have been local. Like last night, we got a last minute gig to take vehicles from Lauderdale up to West Palm at 7 p m. I lucked into a Sonata and it was sweet! I would've loved to take it out for a Key West or Orlando run to get some good seat time in it. But eventually I'll get my chance as I've heard things will be picking up after Labor Day.

    The Sandman

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    edited August 2013
    No problem - I have overlooked Saturn from the day they were born. I could go on and on about the reasons. Bob Lutz puts it best in his book - He threw up when he saw the design sketches for Saturns.

    But then, your point is, cheap car for 1st driver - a Saturn would fit that need, and they don't have any special problems that aren't pretty common in all GM junk.
  • greg128greg128 Posts: 330
    But then, your point is, cheap car for 1st driver - a Saturn would fit that need, and they don't have any special problems that aren't pretty common in all GM junk.

    I replaced my wife's Nissan Maxima with a a 2008 Saturn Aura XR and has outperfomed it in every category including reliability...except for handling.
  • suydamsuydam Posts: 887
    What year Maxima did you have? I had an '01 and it was outstanding in reliability. I just sold it and the people who bought it love it too. The only thing not outstanding about it was premium fuel and fuel economy, so I just bought a new Accord. The old Saturns are probably better in that regard too. Are parts still easy to get for them?
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