Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Subaru Legacy/Outback Wagons Maintenance & Repair

1385386388390391425

Comments

  • ted55ted55 Posts: 11
    Muito Prazer e obrigado amigo!
  • i have a problem with my AWD unit. i have taken it into a local subaru dealership to have it checked out and they said that there is nothing wrong with it. every time i leave my place i have to go through mud a junk. well one day i ended up getting stuck and had to call in to work because of it. has anyone had this problem. if you have let me know because i dont what to go and replace something if it is any easy do it yourself fix. i am very limited on my money do to my hours being cut back
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Could it be the tires? I know that it may seem far fetched but perhaps they weren't gripping?

    -mike
    Subaru Guru and Track Instructor
  • Hello,

    I have a 1996 Subaru Legacy Outback with a bazillion miles on it (270,000) but it still runs great; I have been very happy with this car (even happier because it was a gift from a friend last year!)

    I let the windshield washer fluid reservoir stay empty for approx 3 months. Last weekend, I put new RainX fluid in said reservoir, pressed the button for the fluid and nothing came out; I don't even hear the pump working like I usually did. What's even more interesting is that the rear one works; although, it shoots out fluid like it has prostate problems or something, so I don't really use it, but the pump works.

    Any suggestions? Is there a fuse I can replace? (I know nothing about cars, obviously).

    Perplexed in Albuquerque
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    My guess is there are 2 seperate motors, but I could be wrong.

    A lot of pumps are cooled by the fluids they pump, so that could be why it failed - overheating. That happens to fuel pumps when the tank runs on empty, for instance.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Yes, there are two pumps. One is set lower on the reservoir than the other - the lower one is the pump for the front. I cannot say for sure where the fuse is located (I seem to remember there being two fuse panels - one under the hood, near the reservoir itself, and another under the dash on the left side of the car - but am unsure as to which would contain the washer fuses). I would think replacement of the motor to be inexpensive, so if there does not look to be a fuse problem, try looking for a used motor.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I happen to have a photo of my dad's Outback's fuse box under the hood, and saw no label for a Windshield Washer pump, so it's probably inside.

    It would be by your left knee, under the dash.

    Pop off the cover. The cover itself should have labels. For instance, under the hood, there is a fuse labeled "Fog" for the fog lights.

    Hopefully you see something like "Washer" or "WW", something like that. Take a peek.
  • gjksngjksn Posts: 35
    I have a 2003 Legacy wagon (45,875 miles) and have been told that my brakes are 90% in the front and 40% in the rear. I thought it would be the other way around. In any event, my dealer told me they don't replace them until they're down to 20%. Is that true, or should I be getting them replaced right away? :confuse:
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Go with the dealer, but have it checked again at 60k since that's about the pace you've been on for replacement with 20% left.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    If you have never had the front pads replaced, then I think that is rather odd. The fronts should always wear faster than the rears. If you have had the fronts replaced once, then the rear pads are on pace. The rear pads on my Subaru lasted about 30-40% longer than the front pads. I replaced the fronts at about 125,000 and the rears at around 192,000. Overall longevity, of course, is entirely situational. ;)
  • gjksngjksn Posts: 35
    Hey thanks. I appreciate it.
  • gjksngjksn Posts: 35
    That's what I thought. I've never had any brake work done and couldn't figure out why the rears would go first. Doesn't seem to make sense, but.....
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    It might be an issue of adjustment. I am not familiar with disc brake adjustments, though, so I am really not sure what to check.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Very odd.

    There are no adjustments for disc brakes per-say.

    On most subarus and we do a lot of work on subie brakes, 30-40k is the life of the fronts and 50-60k on the rears. Rotors usually last 80k so roughly every other pad replacement the front rotors should be replaced.

    -mike
    Subaru Guru and Track Instructor
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Well, right. The rear pads are on par with your estimates, but the OP states the front pads are also original! First, 90% at 40,000 miles seems amazing, even to me ;) , but the question remains - why would they be wearing so slowly while the rear pads are wearing on par?

    As you stated.... very odd. :(
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Here's a thought - maybe the parking brake was left on, perhaps just lightly, so the pads wore down a bit more?
  • slickdogslickdog Posts: 225
    Could be hung pads, we've had two in front and one in back on our '01 Outback which were ground down to the backing plate rather quickly because the opposite pad on each wheel became jammed in it's caliper slides. This resulted in pad/rotor replacement for two wheels on three separate occasions.

    The previous post mentioned parking brake, but on ours it's a rather interesting drum brake type design which resides inside of the rotor, so in our case I think a problem with the parking brake would be unlikely to affect the wear of the disc brake components.

    I'll add that in my opinion brakes are by far the weakest part of our Outback. I have two friends who have the same generation Outback, and they have struggled with numerous brake pad/rotor issues over the years as we have. Could be all the crud we drive through in the long NE winters that is contributing, but other cars I've owned didn't need nearly as much attention given to the brakes. Despite this, we all love our Outbacks - especially in the snow!

    Good luck.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Here's a thought - maybe the parking brake was left on, perhaps just lightly, so the pads wore down a bit more?

    That would be amazing, considering that the parking brakes on subarus for the last 15 or so years do not use the regular brake pads for the parking brake. They do a drum-in-disc setup where they have their own pads that press into the inside of the rear brake rotor hats.

    -mike
    Subaru Guru and Track Instructor
  • hey i have a 99 subaru legacy sus and i tried to start it the other morning and all i got was a "click". so we tried to jump start it...no luck, so we thought well the battery is shot, so we got a new one, we tried to start it and still all i get is "click"
    im starting to get irratated, i asked a few people, one said it might have 2 do with the security system and i have to reset it, one said something w the starter and the guy at the dealership in town said ummm idk just get it towed in and we will look at it
    im a girl lol i need help :confuse: :(
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,416
    First thing I'd do is clean the battery terminals very thoroughly and put them back on the battery, then try a jump-start.

    If you still get a click, you might have a bad starter. I don't think this has anything to do with the security system. Don't go there.

    Visiting Host

    MODERATOR

Sign In or Register to comment.