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Infiniti I35 Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    It usually is happening at acceleration. I always heard using Premium gas was a waste money but if that's my problem what gas would you recommend using
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    edited May 2011
    If it sounds like a chain dragging under the car when you accelerate, this could be detonation (pinging) and it is *very bad* for your engine, if it persists and is frequent and loud. (a little 'ping' for a split second is okay).

    Just buy the best gas you can for starters, like Shell or some other name brand, and see how it affects the noise. If it diminishes or goes away, you are on the right track. If it doesn't, you'd best see a mechanic to determine if it is really severe detonation requiring engine adjustments, or if it's some other noise not related.

    In any event, don't postpone acting on this. Severe detonation will punch a hole right through the tops of your pistons. :cry:

    The noise you are hearing are the internal parts of your engine rattling around---literally.

    MODERATOR

  • atma97atma97 Posts: 47
    Knocking sound in acceleration is a symptom of gas with low octane or engine running too lean. One should always use a premium gas for I35. If knocking sound exists after a couple premium gas tanks, then knock sensor need to be replaced ($50 part). For saving on gas, I am adding 3 oz of pure acetone into a 14 gal gas refill and saw mpg increase more than 3 mpg. I am doing this with my own risk but the car is running at its best. At 160,000 miles with a luxury and smooth ride, I could not find a just reason to get rid of this car and get a more luxury and trendy one. Hope not to keep driving this one for another ten years.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    edited May 2011
    Acetone has been shown in rigorous clinical tests to have no affect on gas mileage, and is also corrosive to paint and rubber, so you could confidently abandon it with no worries. I personally never recommend using it. Probably you're experiencing normal variations in MPG and most of us don't have the patience to really measure and calculation out all the variables.

    Your suggestion about a knock sensor is definitely worth looking at and thanks for mentioning it.

    MODERATOR

  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    I have heard there may be more than (1) knock sensor in the 03-I35
    Can you tell me where the location or locations would be and is it something I can change myself
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    edited May 2011
    No just one. Looks like a bit of a job. Book says 3.5 hours for a mechanic. It seems to sit (from the diagram I've got) in the valley between the two cylinder heads--so under the intake---about 2/3rds of the way back. It's also a pricey little devil--not something you'd want to be guessing about. List price close to $200 bucks tho' I'm sure you could shop around and do much better.

    MODERATOR

  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    Well as such as all the parts for Infiniti. If the premium gas doesn't fix the knocking that I'm getting what would the signs be for a knock sensor going bad or about to. Are there any other places I might check to solve this problem
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    edited May 2011
    Well it would be good to get a "second ear" on this noise to make sure we're barking up the right tree...unless you are POSITIVE it's pinging.

    Anyway the knock sensor is supposed to correct for pinging--it's supposed to "hear it" and retard the engine timing. The question then becomes--is the knock sensor working or not, and if it IS, why isn't the engine responding to the signal?

    DESRIPTION: The knock sensor is attached to the cylinder block. It senses engine knocking using a piezoelectric element. A knocking vibration from the cylinder block is sensed as vibrational pressure. This pressure is converted into a voltage signal and sent to the ECM.

    So in theory we could also have an electrical connector issue, or an ECM issue.

    Unfortunately I cannot find any description of how to diagnose and test for a bad knock sensor. I would presume a good repair shop with a CONSULT-II scanning device knows how to do this.

    They used to say "you don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure THAT out"--but you know, sometimes I wonder :sick:

    MODERATOR

  • atma97atma97 Posts: 47
    edited May 2011
    There are other reasons for the engine to knock when the car has high millage. Car might run too lean or too hot. Lean might due to dirty fuel injections or weak fuel pump. Hot might be caused by back up pressure from bad catalytic converters. I would exam spark plugs to figure out how lean the engine runs.

    Knock sensor is bolted to the center of the engine, underneath intake manifold body. As soon as removing the intake manifold upper and lover parts, you will see the knock sensor sitting right on the engine. You will need a new set of manifold gasket though. It might be a good idea to change valve cover gaskets and spark plugs when you have full access to these locations. The whole tedious job requires patience, try not to over tighten the bolts on this engine block. Hope you will have another 100k miles on your car after this job.
  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    Do you think the noise I may be hearing could be the timing chain getting loose or already that way. I've noticed that when you rev the motor you hear a clanging sound or when you shut the motor off
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    Sure could be chain noise from a bad tensioner. Usually you'd hear this more when the engine is 'slack' than when it is being revved but this could be diagnosed with a mechanic's stethoscope.

    MODERATOR

  • melansonmelanson Posts: 1
    Hi,I do not understand who you were talking to.I think they all just wanted your money or didn't want to help!We have gotten our tires for our I35 everywhere and were never told that!We have never had Bridgestone tires either. Firestone,townfair tire and sears have all put tires on for me within a half an hour:)Like i said,never heard of that and have never had a problem and our car is used for delivery all day everyday so we go through tires!
  • I have a similar issue w/ my '04 I35 (130K miles). I've noticed that the knocking sound happens mostly when I am only local roads probably on 2nd gear coasting at 2000rpm. I do not hear it when I'm on the highway. The interesting part is that this morning I had the "service engine soon" light come on. What do you recommend that I look at? Thank you
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    Well pinging only occurs under engine load. You wouldn't be getting pinging if you were coasting leisurely. In any event, scanning for a trouble code might give you some hints.

    MODERATOR

  • I changed the oil and found that it was low on oil even though the dip stick indicated otherwise. Drove about 5 miles to Autozone and had them scan the code and it indicates the camshaft sensor (P0011). Now I'm trying to find a diagram to locate the camshaft "A" sensor
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    I sent a diagram to you via e-mail.

    MODERATOR

  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    I have tried the premium gas and I still get the pinging or valve rattle which ever it might be
    I know the car has high mileage but it has been very well maintained.
    What I'm asking is what would anybody advise to look at next? knock sensor , camshaft semsor etc...
    Thanks
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    Yes could be any of those---you can have the timing checked with a timing light---but cam sensor, crank sensor and even a bad ECM can cause this problem. Also the timing chain could be worn, which would be unusual, but...

    The knock sensor is attached to the cylinder block. It senses engine knocking using a piezoelectric element. A knocking vibration from the cylinder block is sensed as vibrational pressure. This pressure is converted into a voltage signal and sent to the ECM.

    MODERATOR

  • I had the same problem turned out I just had to replace the timing chain/belt.
  • wilson16wilson16 Posts: 20
    That solved the problem completely? How many miles did you have on it when you had this done. This sounds costly!
  • I just had to replace the motor mounts on my 2004 I35. The mount I had to get was quite a bit more expensive than previously thought because as it turns out, the motor mount has a sensor on it and we had to get it from Infiniti. The repair people ( not Infiniti ) had no idea what that sensor did. Anybody know?

    Thanks.
  • mik5423mik5423 Posts: 7
    The mount is filled with a dielectric fluid, hence the wire going to it. Now as far as what it exactly does I'm not sure but I believe it has the ability to stiffen up the mount through the wire and the dielectric fluid during hard acceleration and possibly hard braking as well. I am curious to know how many miles are on your I35 and which mounts you had replaced and what you had to pay for them. I have 85,000 miles on mine and havnt had to replace these yet. only the side mount which dosnt have fluid in it. what kind of symptoms were you experiencing. Thanks.
  • Hello Wetshoe. Did you ever get a response to your inquiry? I am having the same problem with drivers side and passenger side floor getting wet.....Any insight you might be able to provide would be so welcomed!

    Thank you.
    Jule
  • i have the same problem with my daughters 2002 i35. i am just starting to problem solve it. i don't want to spend $800 on a new controller if you have any further info please let me know. if i find a cheaper solution i will let you know.
  • Hi new to forum and had a few issues I wanted to get some info about:

    I have a 03 i35 and the light in the clock has been out for several months now. Not a huge deal but would at least like to see the time at night. Any idea on cost and if I can fix myself? I am not a mechanic but am technically inclined.

    I have the rattling noise from take off to about 40-50 miles an hour. Sounds like a loose bolt but have no idea where to look. Previous post seem to point toward a tensioner but not sure. Any ideas are appreciated!

    A few months ago I hit a bump and my speedometer went all the way to zero. For the next few week it would occasionally read the right speed but now the disk has flipped all the way to the other side so when I start the car it reads past 160. As I accelerate to highway speeds dial will go to about 120, then when I brake goes past 160 again. Would this be a bad sensor or instrument cluster? All the other gauges work fine.

    I also have the wayward sub that seems to work whenever it wants to. I checked connections in trunk and couldn't find anything lose so I have been dealing with it this far. I'm guessing the amp is going out.

    Please help! Thanx
  • Has anyone ever changed one out and if so what are the steps to follow
    My passenger side went out last week and these things cost a fortune at the dealer along with installing I found some on Xexonheadlights.com for less than $115.00 a pair
  • Had a headlight go out on mine also, but it was a broken assembly and had to replace the entire headlight. Was able to locate one from a junk yard and it has worked great. I know what you mean about it costing a small fortune so I hope the one I get will last a while. As far as installing one of these, something I learned while shopping for what I got was that you CANNOT touch the lamp. It will burn out quickly if you do and is hard to do without. About all I can tell you is be careful and good luck. Most people seemed to think it was a better idea to replace the entire headlight, instead of just the lamp. Might be worth checking to see what is available and the costs involved. Good luck.
  • Well I have the bulbs coming and I just found a business who said they would do it for $30.00 both sides because im changing the other one also
    so the brightness will be the same(CAR HAS 285,000 ON IT) THANKS FOR THE RESPONSE
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,830
    Bulb Replacement

    CAUTION: After replacing a new xenon bulb, be sure to make aiming adjustments.
    Hold only the plastic base when handling the bulb. Never touch the glass envelope.
    Do not leave headlamp reflector without bulb for a long period of time. Dust, moisture, smoke, etc. entering headlamp body may affect the performance of the headlamp. Remove headlamp bulb from the headlamp reflector just before a replacement bulb is installed.

    Disconnect negative battery cable.
    Disconnect headlamp connector.
    Remove headlamp assembly.
    WARNING: Never service a xenon headlamp without disconnecting negative battery cable and with wet hands.

    XENON BULB (LOW BEAM)
    Remove headlamp seal cover by turning it counterclockwise.
    Turn bulb socket counterclockwise with keep pushing, then remove it.

    Release retaining pin.
    Remove the xenon bulb.
    Install in the reverse order of removal.
    CAUTION: When disposing of the xenon bulb, do not break it; always dispose of it as is.
    Make sure to install the bulb securely; if the xenon bulb is improperly installed in its socket, high-tension current leaks occur. This may lead to a melted bulb and/or bulb socket.

    HIGH BEAM
    Turn the bulb clockwise (LH high beam) or counterclockwise (RH high beam).
    Remove the bulb.
    Install in the reverse order of removal.

    MODERATOR

  • How does the headlight assembly exactly come out?
    How many screws are there holding the fixture in
    I see 2 on the top Is there another one hiding you can't see
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