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Minivans - Domestic or Foreign

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Comments

  • First off I want to say...Happy Birthday to your Ody! Are you planning to keep it past 100k miles? Wasn't the 2002 year one of the model years that Honda recalled for poor transmission fluid flow and inspected some gear in the transmission for failure? If, so, how did your gear look, did you follow Honda recommended service for the transmission or have you changed the fluid more often?

    The only other information we need to know is how much you get for the Ody when you sell it. Without that informaion we only have half the picture. Thanks!
  • No need to bash everything. The market price of minivan #1 is the market price of minivan #2, adjusted for the perception of the market place. Hondas and Toyotas sell for more than GM minivans because the market allows it. Why? Because many people think they are worth more, but not all people agree.

    I've driven the new GM minivans, they're not bad, but let's face it. They are the old Opel-inspired narrow box with a new long front end that was glued on to improve crash scores. Some people won't care, others may even like it. If they don't mind it why pay the premium for a Honda or Toyota? But they are certainly not in the same league technically.
  • jchan2jchan2 Posts: 4,956
    Ummm... I don't know how long I'll keep it. Perhaps until it breaks, or maybe until I have some cash sitting around or when I pay off the Infiniti. (2 years and 2 months left)

    They did recall my Odyssey, but the dealer checked it (different dealer than the one I use now) and it turned out fine. They inspected second gear I believe.

    I just followed Honda's service guide.

    Any previous Odyssey owners here willing to provide the whole story? (not just half) :)
  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    I really enjoy our 04' Mazda MPV that we have had for over 12,000 troublefree(knock on wood) miles. Though we don't use the fold flat rear seat that often...it sure came in handy in hauling a vast bounty of Christmas booty back home from grandmothers house. The Japanese made quality and performance meets or exceeds those of it's competitiors(in my opinion). The Ford Duratec engine isn't the epitome of refinement...but it is a very good and reliable one. It handles very well and the brakes are excellent. It also is one of the most attractive minivans on the market(with the sport package)...both in the interior and exterior. Perfect for a family of 4. ;)
  • The MPV is another one of those minivans that have slipped through the cracks. If you dont have a need for the extra space, then it's definately worth a look!
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    "No $10K rebate can replace its superior mechanical/driving performance for me. "

    Hey, we're talking about a MINIVAN, not a sportscar. But to each his own. If you plan on taking your wife and kids around twisty roads a little fast in your Odyssey, I'm sure they'll love all that bouncing around that's going on behind you ;) It's almost better to have worse handling because that will prevent people from driving a minivan full of kids like they were in a sports car.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    "you can look up any minivan comparo on any testing sources like C & D, R & T, etc and you would see the domestics at the bottom of the pile for performance. Ford and GM minivans fight for last place. "

    True, but you need to look a little deeper and see the real differences they came in last place. Usually it's for engine power & handling because that's what the car magazines are interested in writing about. They use the same test criteria on sports cars as they do on minivans. But I'd say that most people driving a minivan full of kids to a soccer game or down the highway aren't all that concerned with 0-60 times or G forces
  • macakavamacakava Posts: 775
    "Hey, we're talking about a MINIVAN, not a sportscar. But to each his own"

    It depends on your driving style. Our family vehicles cover a broad range from minivan to sedans, luxury sport sedans, convertibles, and trucks. And in all categories, we choose the better performing ones that are fun to drive while performing their respective tasks. These vehicles include the Ody, CTS-V, Maxima, Ridgeline, SL500, & BMW 550i.

    Oh I forgot to mention our now trusty well maintained 10 yr old Continental with the 32V DOHC V8, that continues to surprise many other drivers on the road with its quick moves.
  • marine2marine2 Posts: 1,155
    When buying my 2005 Dodge G.C., I debated if I should buy the extended warranty. I mean I have a three year, 36,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty and a 7/70,000 power train warranty. Should I get yet another at a cost of around $1,300.00, almost twice what an extended warranty cost on my old Dodge Dakota back in 2001? Well at first I said no, it was to expensive and I shouldn't need it. I didn't need it on the Dakota. But then I read where Chrysler's roadside service doesn't cover you if you get a flat, run out of gas, lock yourself out, etc. It only covers you if a part that is covered under their warranty breaks down. So I called AAA and asked what they charge for road side service for my wife and I. They quoted me a price of $145.00 a year which includes a tow for up to 100 miles. I got out my pin and paper and saw at that price for seven years, I would have to pay $1,015.00 just for roadside service. If I were to have the compressor on my A/C go out in the fourth or fifth year, that alone could cost $1,000.00 or more. Although I didn't want to get it, that 7/70,000 extended warranty seem pretty reasonable to me now. Especially with all the power equipment on the G.C. I seems everything is powered. Even if I never need it, it's only $285.00 more than what I would have to pay AAA for seven years of just road side service.(If they don't raise their rates again that is) This way I have the roadside service and have everything covered on my van for 7/70,000 except wear items for a mear $285.00 more. Not a bad deal after all. Of course Our Honda Civic is covered for roadside service. Check your warranty out on the van you are buying and see if they offer roadside service for flats, out of gas, etc. It might pay you to also get the extended service contract even if you never have a break down.
  • artgpoartgpo Posts: 483
    There is a post on the Kia Sedona board by someone in So Cal who test drove a new 2006 Sedona.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    True about the driving style. But if the only difference is a little better handling, then it's a matter of deciding if a little better handling is worth the price difference. If the few or several thousand dollar difference doesn't matter, then go for what you like. I'm guessing that since you own an "Ody, CTS-V, Maxima, Ridgeline, SL500, & BMW 550i," then money isn't really an issue!
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    " I called AAA and asked what they charge for road side service for my wife and I. They quoted me a price of $145.00"

    Seems expensive to me. I can change my own flat (and my wife can call me if she gets one) and I don't think I'll run out of gas with all of the warning lights that come on starting at 1/4 tank. And I've only needed a tow maybe once every 5-10 years, so I'll just pay for that if it comes up. So to me, the justification of buying the extended warranty based on the cost of roadside assistance doesn't work for me.
  • marine2marine2 Posts: 1,155
    Seems expensive to me. I can change my own flat and I don't think I'll run out of gas with all of the warning lights that come on starting at 1/4 tank. And I've only needed a two maybe once every 5-10 years, so I'll just pay for that if it comes up. So to me, the justification of buying the extended warranty based on the cost of roadside assistance doesn't work for me.

    It is expensive, that is the reason I bought the extended warranty and not AAA. There is only a couple of hundred dollars difference between the AAA and the extended warranty and with the extended warranty you also get road side service. Plus, if your A/C, window, doors, seat motors, go out that is not covered by the drive train warranty, you are covered by the extended warranty. Call up a dealer and ask what it would cost to replace any of those motors or A/C compressor and you'll see buying the extended warranty is a good deal, especially when your covered both ways. You'll have at least seven years of no worries if anything breaks. And if you look at all the power equipment on these new vans, there is plenty of stuff that can go out and cost a bundle to fix.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,225
    You also wouldn't be paying for the AAA upfront like you are the ext. warranty. You're basically giving them free money for at least the length of the OEM factory warranty. I hate ext. warranties, there's a reason they sell them. They make money! Odds are, you lose!

    I think Marine2's point was, AAA is too expensive by itself! I haven't been a member for many years, and not sure why I was a member. With the technology available, calling your own tow truck isn't a big deal. And I can count the number of times I've needed a tow truck on zero fingers. At least in the last 5-6 years. Vehicles are ridiculously reliable these days, and flats aren't even common like they were back in the day.
  • marine2marine2 Posts: 1,155
    Your still looking at it wrong. After 3/36,000 miles, none of the things I mentioned is covered anymore. I know for a fact if an A/C/ compressor goes out, it will cost you over a thousand dollars to fix it. It costs over seven hundred dollars to fix a seat motor. Honda and Chrysler has at least five motors for their windows and liftgate alone. Not counting the motors for the sliding doors. Then you have a starter, alternator, etc. that is also covered. Your counting on none of these things to break in seven years? They don't make them that good. Now if you were talking of a fairly stripped down van or car, I may agree with you. But most of these high priced cars, SUV's and vans have plenty of electrical stuff on them and they go out all the time. Look and see what is now ratedd the most trouble prone SUV on the market. Also one of the most trouble prone cars. It will shock you.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,225
    Statistically, no they're not going to break during the warranty period. They sell these warranties to make money and odds are, they'll pay out less than they take in. The fact that these vehicles have more complicated parts is simply reflected in the higher up-front warranty cost. That's why a 4x4, a heavy-duty truck, or highly optioned vehicle has a more expensive warranty than a cheapo base model.

    I've owned a lot of vehicles and put a lot of miles on them and this stuff doesn't break regularly. At least not at low enough miles to be covered by these extended warranties. Out of all the vehicles I've owned, my repair cost between the factory warranty and 100k miles is very low.

    Of course there's always a chance you might be unlucky and can use the statistics to your advantage. I tend to be lucky with cars.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    I agree with Sebring95. The way I look at extended warranties is that you're betting that you'll have a major repair between 36-100K miles. Once you hit 100K miles, the extended warranty is gone. You're paying $1300 to cover the period between 36-100K miles. I don't know what the $1300 covers, but you really have to read the fine print to see what it covers and what it doesn't, as well as the deductables and how they're calculated (per visit, per problem, etc).

    But even if it covered absolutely everything, my experience with my previous cars ('99 Cougar that I currently own and a '91 Escort) is that I've had $500 in repairs on one car and about $100 on the other before 100K miles. I had to spend about a thousand in my Escort post 100K miles, and about $2K in my Cougar post 100K miles for A/C & alternator issues.

    My point is that if I would spend a thousand or two on every new car for an extended warranty, I'd be down probably $3000 by now. And my current Freestyle if I got an extended warranty for $2K, that means that I would have spent $5000 on extended warranties over the past 14 years with about $600 in benefits, not including deductables.

    So even if in my Freestyle (no extended warranty), if at 85,000 miles the transmission goes out and I need to put in a few thousand dollars I'm still ahead, and based on my experience I'm not expecting any major problems before 100,000 miles. I do drive about 20-25K miles per year, and maybe I've been lucky with the lack of repairs in the pre-100,000 miles range.

    The fact is that most people don't use as much money from the extended warranties than they put into it. Otherwise the extended warranty companies would go out of business. The difference is that I'm betting on the quality of my car based on my experience and you're betting on the lack of quality based on your experience.
  • marine2marine2 Posts: 1,155
    I agree with Sebring95. The way I look at extended warranties is that you're betting that you'll have a major repair between 36-100K miles. Once you hit 100K miles, the extended warranty is gone. You're paying $1300 to cover the period between 36-100K miles. I don't know what the $1300 covers, but you really have to read the fine print to see what it covers and what it doesn't, as well as the deductables and how they're calculated (per visit, per problem, etc).

    The $1,300 covers everything that your 3/36,000 covers on the the regular warranty, plus road side service all up to 7/70,000. You can get it longer. You guys might be lucky and I hope you don't need it. But these vans have a heck of a lot more to them than any car I have ever owned. I have seen plenty of cars out here in Arizona without A/C and I know some are only 4-5 years old. With these new ones now with automatic lift gates and sliding doors, to go along with power seats, windows and door locks, there is just to much more to go wrong than with the older vans. I would rather have the peace of mind that if something breaks, it's covered and if I get a flat, someone else can crawl under my van and get the spare out and change it. I guess if one can spend $23-39,000 for a minivan, $1,300.00 isn't that much more for peace of mind.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,225
    Peace of mind and being financially hurt by paying for a major repair are really the only reasons to consider an extended warranty. If it makes you sleep better at night, go for it. I hate insurance, which is what a ext. warranty is. I buy extremely high deductible on most everything I HAVE to. If somewhere between 36/50k miles (typical factory warranties) and 70k/100k miles (typical ext. warranty limits) I need a $1300 repair it won't hurt me. And I'd much rather take the gamble that I won't need it. Like I said, statistically the insurance companies have the upper hand.

    FWIW, I was offered the 100k mile Honda care warranty for somewhere around $900. I know it was less than $1,000. Not bad as far as warranties go. They wanted $2,700 for the extended warranty on my '03 Ram 3500 and it came with a factory 7/70 powertrain and a 100k engine warranty from Cummins. I'm at 90k miles and used the 7/70 for a u-joint ($500 labor and everything) and that's the only problem.

    I think most folks buying minivans are somewhat thrifty, which is I'm sure why the Honda and Toyota do not sell in record numbers. A warranty really isn't all that thrifty IMHO, it's more of a gamble you're statistically guaranteed to lose.
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