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Minivans - Domestic or Foreign

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Comments

  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I don't know about any of these vans, but a used Tahoe can be had pretty cheap (if you can afford the gas; mileage is about 5mpg less than most of these minivans).

    I did a KBB.com search for a Private Party sale of a used 2001 Tahoe LS 2WD with popular options that include 3rd row seat, PW, PDL, Cr.Ctrl., etc..and 50,000 miles, in "Good" condition. It is estimated at $14,890, and will have a bench that seats three in the second row. You can likely find a better deal than this (newer for the money perhaps) since the recent gas crisis put many SUVs on sale in the marketplace.

    Good luck!
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,231
    The problem with the Tahoe (more so even than a minivan) is that with the 2nd row full of carseats, access to the 3rd row is pretty much gone. I'm not really aware of any minivan/suv that will meet your needs without 3rd row passengers loading through the back hatch or jumping over the 2nd row. Neither attractive choices. A full-size van would work since you can still access the rear row even with 3 across the 2nd row.
  • jchan2jchan2 Posts: 4,956
    I would look for a Chevrolet Astro, although that machine is an ancient truck that's terrible in comparison to the Sienna and Odyssey.

    I can't think of anything else except maybe an 8 passenger Chevy Venture, but the IIHS has crash test scores pegged at POOR for the Venture.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    You raise good points here. A full size van or the Astro look to be about the only options that meet these particular criteria. May I ask, how old are the kids? What are you currently driving?
  • artgpoartgpo Posts: 483
    I would thoroughly investigate the crash test results for the Astro, if available.
  • dennisctcdennisctc Posts: 1,168
    Seems to have the best of everything....

    Kia Sedona
  • hansiennahansienna Posts: 2,312
    Seems to have everything but a well established track record. Sedona would be a good choice for an open minded person who has a reputable Kia dealer conveniently located.
    However, for many of us, the minivan must have the DaimlerChrysler, Honda, Mazda, or Toyota logo prominently displayed. (Listed alphabetically).
  • jchan2jchan2 Posts: 4,956
    I remember looking at the IIHS results on the Astro a few years back and it was rated as Marginal. Not much better than the Venture, but at least it wasn't poor.
  • dennisctcdennisctc Posts: 1,168
    Seems to have everything but a well established track record.

    Remember 40 years ago when the Japanese were known for producing trinkets and junk??? The Koreans are learning fast!! Funny how Kia can now produce a low cost, competitive car here in US while Ford is building Fusions in Mexico?????
  • Depending on the ages of your kids you could look into vans that have integrated child restraints. These are 5 point harness systems built into the passenger seats and also "stow away" for adult use.

    My Venture has two in the middle row. I use one for my three year old and eventually will use the other for my 15 month old. I really love them and with four kids (going on ten years of moving car seats around) I highly recommend them!

    I bought my 2001 Venture used for 8800. However, I am currently experiencing many of the same mechanical problems discussed in these forums.

    I believe the Dodge Caravan also has this seating option.
  • bluedevilsbluedevils Posts: 2,554
    that Car Connection review was the most thorough review I've seen of the 2006 Sedona. It also seemed to emphasize the Sedona's weak spots less than many of the other articles -- exactly the opposite of the Detroit News article posted recently.
  • "ESC will keep the van straight. "

    Almost always as a driver error correction. If you don't make the error, it doesn't come on. It's a safety net, but many of the times it would be needed can be avoided in thr first place
  • "rhaps our new friend also likes to drag race and take highway exit ramps at 85mph...mon! "

    I'm sitting at my desk laughing, mon! :P
  • rorrrorr Posts: 3,630
    "Almost always as a driver error correction. If you don't make the error, it doesn't come on. It's a safety net, but many of the times it would be needed can be avoided in thr first place"

    Yes. You are 100% correct.

    But so is ABS.

    So is virtually every other safety device/advance over the last 50 years (although, to be fair, most of these 'safety nets' are for protection from 'the other guy'). Hey, if nobody made any errors we wouldn't need seat belts, padded dashes, airbags, safety glass, etc. etc. etc.

    Now, if we would just all drive error free.....
  • Yes. You are 100% correct.

    But so is ABS.

    So is virtually every other safety device/advance over the last 50 years (although, to be fair, most of these 'safety nets' are for protection from 'the other guy'). Hey, if nobody made any errors we wouldn't need seat belts, padded dashes, airbags, safety glass, etc. etc. etc.

    Now, if we would just all drive error free..... "

    I think ESC is a little different - at least the way it's marketed. A lot of it is showing how it works great in the snow and rain. If you drive according to the conditions, you don't need it. It will help in an emergency maneuver if you have to swerve out of the way of something, but the weather stuff is all avoidable
  • rorrrorr Posts: 3,630
    "If you drive according to the conditions, you don't need it. It will help in an emergency maneuver if you have to swerve out of the way of something, but the weather stuff is all avoidable"

    Yep.

    How is that any different from ABS?

    I'm interpreting that what you are saying is "hey, be a better driver and you don't need ESC".

    True. And if we were ALL better drivers we wouldn't need yada yada etc. Is ESC a safety net? Yep. Are the situations which incite skids avoidable? Absolutely.

    Of course, the vast majority of all accidents are avoidable to some extent if we were ALL just better drivers. But I'd still like to have my seat belts, airbags, padded dash, door beams, etc. etc. etc.
  • artgpoartgpo Posts: 483
    Today's issue of "Autoweek" online has another opinion of the Sedona. I will let y'all read it yourselves because I don't want rioting to break out. ;)
  • How is that any different from ABS? "

    IMO, the ABS controlled by the car's computer works better than pumping the brakes. It much easier to jam on the brakes and worry about steering than having to pump the brakes while steering. This is more about physical abilities than a correction the car makes after the fact. IMO, of course
  • The public didn't like the funky console, so they responded. Smart move. Interior looks much better now, IMO. Should give them a little boost, I would think. For me, if we enter the market again, which might be a possibility, we will look at the Quest...

    http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/News/articleId=109225#4
  • rorrrorr Posts: 3,630
    Again, how is this any different from ESC?

    The stability control systems can detect impending skids MUCH MUCH earlier than normal drivers. By the time most drivers detect a skid, they're not far away from being out of control. Often times, drivers tend to overcorrect for skids sending the vehicle oscillating back and forth. With stability control systems, the driver frequently doesn't even know that the system even kicked in until they see a light on the dash.

    I know I've posted this numerous times before, but it speaks volumes about the capabilities and importance of ESC systems:

    http://www.caranddriver.com/article.asp?section_id=27&article_id=9036

    Additional info as it looks like the NHTSA is close to making ESC a requirement for all vehicles (and the rationale):

    http://www.caranddriver.com/article.asp?section_id=30&article_id=10623
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