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CR-V vs Escape

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Comments

  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    The gaskets in question on the CR-V were installed in the factory. Again, same thing.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    75,000 miles is not the bar for durability, at least not in my social circles. 150,000 is nothing to brag about. You get to 200,000 miles and some of the people I know will care. Heck, my parents 1988 Crown Vic had 180,000 miles on it when they got rid of it, albeit the transmission had to be rebuilt at 130,000.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    Is going to be a non-issue in a couple years if Ford can't find a way to make a profit. I read the other day FMC lost over $12 billion in '06. They had to take out a loan for 23 billion to try and turn things around. Ford had better start turning out updated models a LOT sooner than every 8 years (or 20+, in the case of the Ranger), if they hope to compete with the Japanese. Of course, that's not going to happen when the company can't pay its bills. That's what happens when you think only short term. It seems to me the only thing Ford cares about is "Quality is Job 1" for their F150. Everything else was overlooked, so now the bottomline, and its product line, are showing it.
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
    You get to 200,000 miles and some of the people I know will care.

    That works out to about 15 years and I'll concede that you will know much sooner that if the vehicle is not durable. :)

    tidester, host
    SUVs and Smart Shopper
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    For people like my parents, that'd equate to less than 7 years! My dad traded his 2005 Accord in Novemeber 2006 for a 2007 Civic Sedan. it had 69k miles on it in less than two years (got the Accord around Christmas 04), so you can see why some of us think 75k is a drop in the mileage bucket.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    I'm saying I don't know people who brag about cars with even 150,000 miles on them with no problems. Certainly not 75,000. I put over 70,000 miles on my 2nd car, a '93 Dodge Shadow, after buying used with 39,000 miles. My little brother now uses it as his college car. None of us have ever had to stick a dime into it, even though it has been badly abused since I passed it on a few years ago. I'd still never claim Chrysler is a reliable brand because of my ONE experience with one of their products.

    On the other hand, my '03 ZX2, which I hastily traded away at 18,000 miles a couple years ago, was ALREADY having problems with its transmission. Despite the fact that I've known several people who have logged heavy miles on little Escorts, I suppose I could say all Escorts are garbage. But I won't. :blush:
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,621
    to me, driving that many miles in a short time makes no sense. i don't want to spend that much time in a car.
    i have made sure i live not too far from work.
    have any guys bought a new cr-v? the escape plays to a wider audience.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    to me, driving that many miles in a short time makes no sense. i don't want to spend that much time in a car.
    i have made sure i live not too far from work.


    The folks live 13 miles from work, and ride together (work at the same place). It's not that far really, by my standards (I drive 14 miles to school 4 days a week). Having had a condo 300 miles away on the gulf coast meant they were driving the 600 mile trip every other weekend since 2004, hence the rapid mileage buildup.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    We bought our 2005 CR-V new. Why does that matter?
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,621
    don't have a vacation home, but wouldn't want to live that far from it either. ;)
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Well, it is my parents' dream to retire to the gulf coast, so they bought one when they could afford to (before the prices inflated to double what they were when they bought it). In Birmingham, a vacation, other than going to the lake/river, is always at least 3 hours away. The bright side, is that Mountains are 350 miles (Gatlinburg, TN) and the beach is 290 miles (Gulf Shores/Orange Beach, AL), so you are between two very different locales.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    Kind of funny you mention this. Yes, I did change my oil in my Escape, yes I did drip oil on the hot manifold. Yet.. For some strange reason my Escape never caught fire!!

    Yet, the fact that mine has not caught on fire means nothing to you??
  • twaintwain Posts: 185
    I am looking for a $20-24,000 SUV and I recently test drove the 2008 Escape XLT and a 2007 Honda CRV.
    -----------------------------------

    My wife and I recently bought a 2007 Mercury Mariner, the same vehicle as the Escape. It's the Premier model and stickered at 26k. We're both around 50 so ride, entry/exit and comfort are important to us too.

    As for ride, it's very smooth on smooth roads but can get a little "jouncy" on bumpier pavement. It's only a 103" wheelbase.

    Entry/exit... our last vehicle was a 2003 Saturn Vue and it was excellent for entry/exit. One of the best SUVs in that regard. The Mariner is a little higher to step in and out but still not difficult.

    My main complaint with the V6 Mariner is MPG. I'm sure the CRV would have it beat. The Mariner/Escape should have a 5sp auto but only has a 4sp. The 4cyl Escape with a 5sp manual gets decent MPG if that's an option.

    Unless an SUV type vehicle is a must, there are other alternatives for comfort, space, mpg and ease of entry. The Mazda 5 and the Kia Rondo to name two.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Nope, not the same. The gasket in question on the CR-V remained behind on SOME CR-Vs when the oil filter was changed. Operator error on the part of the oil changer.

    The Escapes issue was incorrectly installed or missing gaskets at the point of manufacture. Completely different.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    The cause was, according to the article posted earlier, a gasket that was manufactured incorrectly and had a higher probability of melting and sticking. ALL of them were installed in the factory making this problem a build problem. i.e. they built the vehicles with a bad part.

    I think you are trying to twist it into an installation error which is not what I was arguing. The problem originated at the factory for both and that's all I'm saying. You guys can blame the oil changers all you want but the fact still remains that Honda put a bad part on the CR-V and didn't care enough about the customer to recall them.
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,119
    "You guys can blame the oil changers all you want but the fact still remains that Honda put a bad part on the CR-V and didn't care enough about the customer to recall them."

    This is a huge double standard that exists.. some don't see it.. are refuse to see it?? :shades:
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
    This is a huge double standard that exists...

    Why are we continuing with this?

    tidester, host
    SUVs and Smart Shopper
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Beats me. Last I checked, there were no incidents involving the 2007 CR-V, manufacturer OR mechanic related, so its relevance eludes my understanding.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    "You guys can blame the oil changers all you want but the fact still remains that Honda put a bad part on the CR-V and didn't care enough about the customer to recall them."

    This is a huge double standard that exists.. some don't see it.. are refuse to see it??


    There is a HUGE difference when a maintenance item is faulty. Something that is only going to be on the car for 5000 miles, as opposed to a lifetime items such as ABS module, or the rear bearing hubs.

    Honda did issue an order for the dealers to replace all filter on the incoming CR-V's with the redesigned ones.

    Even if they issued a recall, what would it be for? Oil filter recall? By the time fires were happening the faulty filters have already been removed. I don't see logic in recalling something that has alredy been removed. Do you?

    Sometimes I wonder if logic is truly a gift only a few posess.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,184
    The impression I got (perception is reality, right?) was that Honda was playing hide the ball on the filter issue. Reminded me of Toyota's handling of the sludge issue. The ease of access of information nowadays has forced corporations to be more open, whether they want to be or not.

    The smartest corporations, imo, are the ones who blog about all their internal goings-on; if there's a screw-up somewhere, better that we learn about it from the company and have the employees tell us what they are doing about the problem. When we know the people running the corporation, we tend to trust their actions more (and we become more forgiving of the inevitable screw-ups as well).

    And yeah, I read the recent Wired article about radical transparency the other day (link).

    GM seems to have the right idea - they did the "make your own Chevy commercial" and let the obnoxious ones stay up and their FastLane Blog is pretty well known. I don't know if Honda or Ford blogs for public consumption or not, but if they do, they need to get the word out better.

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  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    I can see where the comparison might be drawn but I don't agree. People whose CR-V burned up were covered. I'm assuming Ford is going to cover the people whose Escapes burned up. Toyota has blamed the customer for the sludge problems. I still don't know why Toyota handled that issue they did. It was obvious to everyone there was a design flaw. I have a sludged Chevy Prizm (Corolla engine) so I have researched this issue as much as humanly possible.

    On the other hand, Honda didn't want to take responsibility for something that shouldn't have been an issue with a competent oil changer. I understand that, and it's why I don't take my car to Jiffy Lube or Wal-Mart to get my oil changed.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    On the other hand, Honda didn't want to take responsibility for something that shouldn't have been an issue with a competent oil changer.

    I'm down with that. However seeing that they blamed the problem on a faulty part they should have owned up to it more IMO. Notifying oil changers should have only been part of the solution. Notifying owners too would have been the best action to take especially after seeing CR-Vs catch fire after the oil changers were instructed to be careful.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    I don't even know if they said the part was faulty. They said inadvertent exposure to the salty air during transport from Japan compromised the gaskets, which then made them more likely to stick. Even at that point, everyone who changes oil knows you have to get the gasket off or the next filter won't seal and the oil will drain out.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    The link the host posted said the rubber was exposed to something when it was manufactured and therefore had a higher tendency to melt and stick. It said nothing of salty sea air.

    So I read they were screwed on too tight, a host showed us where it might have been the rubber of the gasket itself, and now you are telling us it was the sea air during shipment. Which was it? Or are there more excuses that exonerate Honda and somehow excuse them from protecting their customers better? :P
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,184
    In any event, it's past history, so let's give it a rest and give Tides a break from re-reading the whole history (I'm off on holiday and don't care, LOL).

    Anyone cross-shopping lately?

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,184

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  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    That was bound to happen soon.

    I'll still take our Explorer over any of these small utes. The gas mileage is the only weakness about it but I don't mind. It is an extremely comfortable and useful vehicle to have in the garage. I say this as a father of two. If not for that then the smaller utes are the way to go IMO.
  • dromedariusdromedarius Posts: 307
    People's apparent allergies to first the station wagon, and then the minivan. If you need room for kids and luggage and you don't need other people's approval on your choice of vehicle, a minivan should be your first choice. Not to mention the superior safety and fuel economy. As the next best thing, it's no surprise to me that the CR-V has passed the Explorer and the Escape, since I believe a vehicles purpose is to get you from Point A to Point B:

    1) Safely

    2) Efficiently

    Honda has always gotten this. Maybe America is STARTING to catch on!

    :P

    BTW, our 2005 CR-V got 26 MPG on our last tank (all-time high is 29.5 MPG). And my 2001 Chevy Prizm got 39 MPG. My oldest knows we only drive in "Mama's car", though, although I'm willing to bet he doesn't know it's because it's the one with all the airbags.

    :shades:
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,211
    People's apparent allergies to first the station wagon, and then the minivan.

    I don't either drom, but my wife drives the family vehicle so she gets to pick. We've sat in and drove minivans and wagons and she just will not own one. I really like both so it's a point of tension when time to shop for the new family hauler unfortunately.

    Not to mention the superior safety and fuel economy.

    I'll give you the fuel economy but the safety is a toss up IMO. Especially if you live in an area that gets snow 5 months of the year as we do.
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