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CR-V vs Escape

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  • crvme3crvme3 Posts: 140
    Oops... my bad! thanks for the correction
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Some people just have different ideas of a long-lasting car. I'm not at all saying his Escape COULD NOT go 175k miles with only a couple of minor repairs here or there, but tell somebody "my car is up to 75k miles now" these days, and they generally won't be surprised/impressed. Heck, that's only three years of driving for me.
  • crvme3crvme3 Posts: 140
    I hear you, been in the auto repair industry in one form or another for over 25 years now... IMO any car is good as gold for the first 5 years, around year 6-7 the domestics just seem to start going downhill (but with anything there are exceptions) the big 3 Japanese (Honda,Toyota,Nissan) at the 6-7 year point & beyond just seem to hold up better. Seems sad our big 3 can't or won't produce the same qaulity & longivity... could this be 1 reason why they are in financial trouble?
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    Let me chime in here. As an ex Escape owner.. My 01 Escape XLT V6 4WD lasted over 70,000 miles with no problems. I used it to tow two watercraft and visit my favorite fishing/skiing spots in the Cascade mountains here in the North West. My wife owns an 04 Mazda Tribute ES V6 4WD with over 30,000 trouble free miles and it is also used to tow and visit the Mountains for skiing/fishing. Check the MSN reliability data and it will show you the Escape is every bit as reliable as a CRV. Plus, you can actually bargain with a Ford dealer and get a lower price/financing than a comparably equipped CRV. Go with the Ford/Mazda/Mercury.. you won't be dissappointed.

    Sure Escape made it up the hills, but lost about 15 mph while I held the pedal to the floor. There was no power whatsoever. The Scangauge read 99% engine load.

    CR-V on the other hand, just keeps climing hills while maintaining speed.

    75,000 miles is nothing. It used to be the 100,000 mile as the marker of dependability, but that has been pushed to 150,000 miles. I am sure a Kia and Hyundai can drive for 75,000 miles as well.

    The real reliability test comes in after 200,000 miles. This is where Ford is missing the beat. Of course it does not make sense for a company in financial trouble making reliable cars, since people will stop buying them. Once you brain wash your customers that blue oval is the thing to stick with, then you can generate repeat sales every 3-4 years. If you make a car that can run for 20 years trouble free, then you will have to worry if they come back soon enough to plop more cash down for your car. Luckily, more and more people are reapizing that blue oval or bow tie has been brain washing them all these years and cultivated a culture where if you wanted a reliable car, you had to buy new every 3-4 years. Japanese, build cars to last. You don't need to keep getting new car once it approaches 100,000 miles, you just keep driving it.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Ya just had to use the word "brainwash" didn't you? Don't you know all Honda owners are brainwashed in the first place? And we're touchy about it, to boot.

    Oh yeah, and we all paid sticker, since none will deal on a car. None at all.

    For those left drowning in the deep sarcasm, I apologize.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,788
    "Ya just had to use the word "brainwash" didn't you? Don't you know all Honda owners are brainwashed in the first place?"

    Oh, my goodness. I had a 2003 CR-V (and like Honda), and now I have a 2006 Ford Freestyle. This must mean my brain is double-washed. :confuse:

    I actually test drove the 2006 Escape Hybrid, but compared to the CR-V, I found it a bit tippy (feeling) - and this at about 15 MPH! So I didn't purchase the Escape... :surprise:
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Oh, my goodness. I had a 2003 CR-V (and like Honda), and now I have a 2006 Ford Freestyle. This must mean my brain is double-washed.

    Geez, buddy. You've got some serious issues! :) :P
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
    You've got some serious issues!

    Nah! It's just fastidious and thorough spring cleaning! :shades:

    tidester, host
    SUVs and Smart Shopper
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    I actually test drove the 2006 Escape Hybrid, but compared to the CR-V, I found it a bit tippy (feeling) - and this at about 15 MPH!

    Escape is indeed tippier. It leans a lot more in corners, which does not inspire confidence. It also leans forward a lot when braking.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,788
    "Escape is indeed tippier. It leans a lot more in corners, which does not inspire confidence. It also leans forward a lot when braking."

    I think that VSC is standard on the 2008 model?
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Not sure what VSC will do for body roll and handling prowess other than hit the brakes in an emergency-type situation. 15 MPH isn't exactly emergency speed :)
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,788
    "Not sure what VSC will do for body roll and handling prowess other than hit the brakes in an emergency-type situation. "

    VSC keeps the car from rolling over or otherwise losing control. Even if the body rolls a bit, I would have confidence it won't go out of control.

    I would have gotten the 2006 Escape Hybrid if VSC was available.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,614
    i find our old '04 escape has perfectly normal overall handling/braking feel.
    i guess it 'depends' on what you are used to. ;)
  • richk6richk6 Posts: 87
    CR mentions the 08 Ford/Mazda Escape/Tribute will have standard stability control, but does not recommend the 07 versions because they tipped up in government rollover tests.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803

    VSC keeps the car from rolling over or otherwise losing control. Even if the body rolls a bit, I would have confidence it won't go out of control.

    I would have gotten the 2006 Escape Hybrid if VSC was available.


    Body roll is not an indicative of the vehicle's tendency to roll over. A Freightliner/Mack truck does not lean much, but you take it around a corner at speed and it will roll over.

    Roll over is a function of the wheel width, speed and cornering angle. Body roll is just not very comfortable thing. It may limit the traction you get at the opposing end of the vehicle (turck leans to the right front, lower traction at left rear). But don't confuse the two.

    VSC may or may not help with roll over. Someone doing 90 mph, driving with one hand on the phone and the other holding a coffee cup, while tweaking the radio is not going to benefit from VSC when they jerk the wheel.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,210
    VSC may or may not help with roll over. Someone doing 90 mph, driving with one hand on the phone and the other holding a coffee cup, while tweaking the radio is not going to benefit from VSC when they jerk the wheel.

    You guys are forgetting that Ford's system is the same as Volvo's and includes RSC, or Roll Stability Control. Now I don't know how much it can do in blue's example but it is supposedly a very good system from what I've read.

    Our Explorer has the new system with RSC and I can't say I ever activated the roll system for sure but I may have and not known it. The only time the VSC/RSC light flashed is when I swerved to miss a deer doing ~45 mph on a local highway. The manuever was so smooth I was shocked. I was expecting tipping and skidding but instead it was like a normal pass around a disabled vehicle in the road if that makes sense. The kids in the back didn't even flinch and my wife still can't believe there's no damage to the truck. We were really close to it when it jumped out in front of us.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 27,671
    Most roll-overs happen when high center-of-gravity vehicles leave the roadway...

    The reason that VSC equipped vehicles have fewer roll-overs is directly attributable to the driver NOT losing control of the car, and then leaving the road..

    Some high-end vehicles have anti-rollover technology, but the standard VSC in most vehicles have nothing to specifically help that. They just help you to maintain control.

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  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,614
    do you mean the government rollover index? that is a static test.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,210
    Some high-end vehicles have anti-rollover technology, but the standard VSC in most vehicles have nothing to specifically help that. They just help you to maintain control.

    Every new Ford, i.e. it's new SUVs and CUVs, with AdvanceTrac and RSC has the same exact roll control as every new Volvo. It's not just higher end vehicles that have the roll control anymore and IIRC Ford was the first to offer it in a mainstream vehicle. with the 2005 Expedition. I'm pretty sure GM has something similar in it's SUVs too now. Don't know if it's as good or better than the Volvo system in the Fords though.

    I think all it really is is an extra gyroscope and computer code.
  • richk6richk6 Posts: 87
    CR has NHTSA rollover ratings which are based on a static measurement of a vehicles center of gravity in the april auto issue safety section.

    They also state "For light trucks NHTSA also uses a dynamic (moving) driving maneuver test. Vehicles that tip up on two wheels in that test are noted with an asterisk".

    In the vehicle profiles section CR says the 07 Escape, Tribute, Mercury Mariner and Saturn Vue tipped up in the rollover test.
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