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Pickup Trucks for Women (Experiences/Opinions)

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  • KCRam@EdmundsKCRam@Edmunds Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,495
    tread and mtn,

    A radiator flush done correctly is a good thing. The remains of any rusted radiator core will show up along with discoloration due to contaminants. Anti-freeze can be "deadly" if not thoroughly flushed and changed - Despite all the advances in coolant technology, I change mine every 18 months, period end of story.

    Oil flushes are bogus. Change your oil based on how fast it gets dirty, and keep the engine tuned and running properly, and your oil shouldn't need to be flushed. If your engine develops deposits quickly, then change it more often. If you can get by with reasonably clean oil for 5000 miles, then that should be fine as well.

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  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    Thanks for the information. I definitely think that should be the next step in trying to sort the Taco out. My other half is half inclined to just let it sit (drive it around the block once a week) for 6 months, then trade it off. Neither of us like it enough to want to put a whole lot of money into fixing it. It will have to wait for 3-4 weeks anyway, until we have a chance to get to it. Our now daily-driver Wrangler needs an oil change and tire rotation, and that comes first.
  • treadltlytreadltly Posts: 12
    I have an old suburban I'd like to keep going just a bit longer, hence the flush questions. I did read further in other forums here about leaving sludge where it is, rather than have it circulate into the moving parts & cause more problems. I hadn't really thought of it that way. I know when my boss & I used to test new piping systems (industrial), we used to run an oil flush for days to a week until the strainer baskets came up with no welding slag or metal particles. Mind you, this was new piping, and the connections were isolated from any of the final flanges to the equipment. I'm glad I asked before jumping the gun on this one. It sounded good at first. Thanks
  • KCRam@EdmundsKCRam@Edmunds Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,495
    tread, that's a common bit of advice for many mechanical devices - flush it out when new to get all the shavings, etc. out of it. That's fine if you have the time and opportunity to baby the device in question. But unlike your piping systems, most people don't have the luxury of pre-testing when they buy a vehicle.

    Go ask a trucking company what they do with a brand new Peterbilt when they pick it up from the dealer. Yup, they fire it up, hook a loaded trailer to it, and run the bejeezus out of it from day one. Heavy duty trucks don't make money for their owners being "babied" for the first XXXX miles. That applies to light trucks as well. They don't run as well if they have "nothing" to do. When you buy a Dodge Ram with the Cummins diesel, you are advised to "give it work" as soon as possible - the rings seat faster and more evenly when you can get the engine temperatures up where they should be. Gasoline engines are similar. If all you do with a brand new V8 is drive down the street to 7-Eleven for the first 1000 miles, you've actually harmed it more than helped it. Go find a country two-lane highway with some hills, throw some crap in the back, and DRIVE the thing. I took delivery of my Ram on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend in 1996. By the time I got to work Tuesday, I had a good 500 miles on it. And a big smile :)

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  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    I must apologize, I just read this thread for the first time. Going back to mrb's post about certain vehicles not being feminine, I think one of the sexiest sights on the road is a woman driving a Wrangler with the top off.
  • jcave1jcave1 Posts: 137
    I'm so glad to see this thread is still very much alive. It's certainly been interesting. Looks like it might continue.
  • obyoneobyone Posts: 8,065
    is a truck? Now that's news to me. Also, when you state "with the top off", are you referring to the Wrangler or the woman? Call me curious....not sexist.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    A Wrangler could be defined as a truck because of its truck suspension system, and because it has an open bed in the back like a truck (if you take the top off or have a bikini top on the vehicle, not referring to the girl in it). The driver sits as high as a truck.

    It could be defined as an SUV - it is 4x4 and certainly a sporty utility vehicle - much more than many of the current "SUVs." Even with stock tires the driver sits up as high as many of the other SUVs. With the 30" wheel group, without a lift, it is as high as all the full sized SUVs.

    It could be defined as a subcompact convertable car - it has about that much room in it for passengers as many subcompacts, and it is a convertable regardless of what top you have on it.

    It could be defined as a hatchback/stationwagon, if you have the hard top on.

    So how do I, as an owner, define the Wrangler? A fun vehicle, whatever it is!
  • jcave1jcave1 Posts: 137
    I'd call it double fun if it's a topless girl in a topless Wrangler. It's so hard to behave. So hard.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    LOL!

    Or its just nice artwork.
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    but I wouldn't mind the girl either!!! I agree with mtngal. Just what the hell is a Wrangler? It is nearly a "do all" vehicle and a lot of fun to boot. I would love to be able to afford a Wrangler to use as my daily driver and keep the F-350 for working. But you know, mortgage and kids.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    At the moment I'm not real excited about getting our Tacoma fixed, because that means we're using the Wrangler as our daily driver. The Wrangler is certainly more comfortable than the Taco. However, I've always found full sized pickups to be very comfortable, probably more comfortable than the Wrangler, so think that your F350 might be a better daily driver, unless you are talking about commuting in a congested urban area. Then the Wrangler wins big time.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    the Wrangler is to look at the reviews comparing mini-SUVs. They hardly ever mention the Wrangler, so it must not fit into that category...
  • kg11kg11 Posts: 530
    In the 1930's the U.S. Govt asked manufacturers to produce a 1/4 ton truck for military purposes.My '47 CJ 2 is classified as a truck on the pink slip and insurence policy.
    It's a truck.

    kip
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    Good point! The military version continued to be classified and officially known as Truck, 1/4 Ton, until it was finally phased out of the Army. I was still on active duty when that happened, and have read many equipment reports (TO&Es).

    It's interesting that the pink slip for your CJ has it classified as a truck.
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    I think the reason why the Wrangler is never mentioned in the mini-SUV comparisons is because the Wrangler will beat them every time. I can't read commercial vehicle comparisons because lots of times they never say anything bad about the vehicles. I remember one in particular that Motortrend did, I'm a little biased toward the Ford, but I promise I won't twist what they said, and if anyone has the transcripts to prove me wrong, please tell me. They compared the 3/4 ton Silverado to the F-250 XLT. The trucks were similarly loaded with extended cabs, auto's, 4x4, and so on. I'm not for sure on the engines, but I think the Ford had the 5.4 while the Chevy had a 6.0(?). They talked about how much nicer it was that the Chevy bed was 6 inches lower to the ground so loading would be easier, never mentioned what that 6 inches would cost you off road. They compared towing capabilities with a 5,000lb(I think) trailer, not maximum weight. If you'll notice, they compared the extended cabs, not crew cabs and they compared gassers, and not diesels. I know these shows try to compare what the average buyer wants, but around here, most 3/4 ton trucks are Ford PSD. I think Chevy "paid" them more than Ford for the favorable comparison. I'm sorry, this was completely off topic. I had to vent on that one, even two years later, it still makes me ill.

    Back to the thread. The long wheelbase of the F-350 does make for a comfortable ride, but I have always loved the Wrangler.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    I enjoy reading the reviews of vehicles. I learn a great deal from them - if only about the reviewer. Seriously, though, what I'm looking for in a vehicle isn't what most people look for, so I take what I read at it's face value - just someone's opinion. Truck reviews are no different than SUV reviews - they don't always look at vehicles from my prospective (hence my comment about the Wrangler reviews). I take that into account, and if I were to buy what some of the reviewers suggest, I'd never get out of my driveway in winter! The Wrangler is excellent for that.

    I'm particular about the height of my trucks. As I mentioned before, I quit looking at the Dakota because the dealer I went to only had 1 and it was lowered. I thought it looked like the most worthless truck in the world. I've since seen "real" ones and am sorry I didn't look at them further. My opinion (like yours) - higher is better. Why would someone want a lower truck if it won't make it through the field when you are picking up bales of hay?

    I will admit that the F-350 I looked at (crew cab - they didn't have an extended cab when I test drove one) looked wonderful. However, I couldn't figure out how to park it. I would definitely have to practice, since I am now used to parking the Wrangler. And yes, it sure is a fun little vehicle, whatever it is!
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    I haven't kept up with it in the last few years, but if we let Consumer Reports guide us into our vehicle purchases, we'd all be driving Camrys or Accords. The height issue, amongst many other reasons, is why I got away from a Chevy. My 2wd 350 sits higher than my last 4wd Silverado. That Chevy would come out of a field dragging objects the 350 just rolls right over. I just have to laugh when I see someone with a lowered truck. Why don't they just buy a car? It's obvious that is really what they want. We even have a couple of lowered 1 tons around here, talking about useless.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    The last full sized pickup I had was a '76 3/4 ton Chevy and it had pretty good height for a 2wd. It certainly was tough. I sold it in excellent running condition in 1990 (exterior was rough, but it wasn't that great before I bought it).

    I guess its a matter of "to each his own." I agree with you - a lowered 1 ton doesn't make sense to me, but it does to someone else. I guess that's why they still make all sorts of cars - what makes sense to my parents living in the middle of the Mojave desert wouldn't work for me up here in the mountains.

    I personally don't like the styling on the 1/2 ton Ford Flare side - I prefer my truck to provide maximum cargo space (whether it be a compact or a full sized truck). On the other hand, I do like the styling on the Dodge Ram pickups. And if I were to be able to afford a full sized truck I would most likely start by looking at the Chevys, since I had such good luck with my old one(s). But if they are lower (and they could be - there was so much noise a while ago to lower both trucks and SUVs), then I'd go with the Ford or Dodge instead.
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    Your '76 3/4 ton Chevy is a tough truck. In fact, I wish some manufacturer still made them. GM really changed their trucks from the '87 to '88 model year. I had both an '87 and an '88, you would not believe the difference. The '87 would handle anything imaginable that you would do with a 1/2 ton. That was one tough truck, it was built "like a rock". The '88 on the other hand, well, let me put it to you this way. I burnt the tranny up pulling a 4,000lb trailer. It would not drive in slow city traffic in the summer without overheating. Every damn switch in that truck gave me trouble. I measured the rear portion of the frame, under the bed. It only measured 3 inches top to bottom. The '87 measured nearly 4 inches. Everything about that truck was built too light for my taste. But, don't get me wrong, that truck ran up and down the road, empty of course, light a bat out of hell. The '87, well, anything over 70mph was beginning to push it. It had a 4.10 rear in it. I didn't have a tach, but at 70, it sounded like a Winston Cup Car. I used to drive around with the windows down just to hear it scream. Of course, I do that now just to hear the PSD and smell the exhaust.

    Boy, did I ramble on? Sorry.
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