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SPORTS CARS OF THE 60's

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,373
    edited September 2011
    Here's a website with that reference, but it's not the one I looked at when I posted the earlier comment. For decades, the Studebaker Drivers' Club and Avanti Owners Association International have reported that an Avanti was the first modern automobile to be showcased in an art museum, and the historians in those clubs typically are guys who will shoot down hearsay and can back up stuff.

    http://www.route66-appraisals.com/home/1963_Studebaker_Avanti.html

    I think the XKE is the best-looking import, ever, although I hate the wide whites on that '61 above. Geez, it's not a Chrysler New Yorker, it's a Jaguar XKE! I would be leery of owning one due to the widely-reported English lack of reliability, and I'm assuming parts aren't real available but could be wrong on that.
  • I think what people mean is that the E-Type is in the *permanent* collection in New York and was placed there when it was first built. So I think the point was that its classic design was recognized immediately--which was true--the entire world went nuts when the car was introduced. i doubt if any car has had such an initial impact culturally or globally since then, I mean from the day it was born. Moreoever, unlike many designs, there seem to be no controversy over its styling---everyone pretty much agrees that it's top cat or one of 'em anyway.

    Yes, they are tough to restore. Like many old "classics" they can be made more reliable than when they were first built.

    Also the market for them seems to have peaked at the moment.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,405
    2012 is the 50th anniversary of the introduction of three remarkable British sports cars:

    -The Shelby/AC Cobra, the Anglo-American hybrid that revolutionized production sports car racing by dethroning Ferrari and Chevrolet (Corvette)

    -The Lotus Elan, the little roadster that epitomized the philosophy of Colin Chapman: "Add lightness". It also became the styling template for the Mazd Miata perhaps the most popular two-seater in history.

    -The MG-B, it brought the small bore sports car to a new level by introducing unit bodies and roll-up windows and became the most popular two-seater of the era.

    The Italians were busy in 1962 as well. Ferrari introduced the 250GTO which dominated GT racing until Shelby put aerodynamic bodywork on the Cobras (Cobra Daytona Coupe). '62 also saw the introduction of the 250GT Lusso Berlinetta arguably the most beautiful GT car ever made.

    1962 was also the last year for production of the Mercedes 300SL.

    Besides these beauties the buyer of a new sports car or GT in 1962 could also choose a:

    Jaguar E-Type, Alfa-Romeo Giulietta, Maserati 3500GT, Austin-Healey 3000 MkII, Triumph TR4,
    Chevrolet Corvette (C1), Porsche 356B.

    I still have my Road & Track 1962 Road Test Annual, it's chock full of amazing cars. I don't think there's ever been a better year to buy a new two-seater.



    -
  • berriberri Posts: 4,018
    Loewy was born in Paris actually. The French are fond of him.

    Wasn't Loewy really more salesman than designer? I seem to have gotten the impression more than a few times that he mostly took credit for others work, but that he was also one hell of a salesman. Hmm, sounds a bit like Iaccoca maybe?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,944
    Really, it was a good year to buy most classes of cars. The Big 3 were pretty decent, the indies were still alive, foreign passenger cars were interesting, lots of choices.
  • ks55ks55 Posts: 8
    Wide whitewalls were popular around this era and have to be thought of of what was in vogue at that period. Wide Whitewall tires yes, even showed up on some imports such as an E Type. Silly looky oday for sure but back then they were the rage on Domestic and even some Imports.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,405
    The width of whitewalls began to shrink during the 60s. When the decade began most were fairly wide but by '65 they had become just a thin stripe.

    In the USA most foreign and sports cars were delivered sporting whites but not many imports had them after mid-decade when red-striped tires were offered as an alternative (mainly in the aftermarket).
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