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Inconsiderate Drivers (share your stories, etc.)

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    Money talks, something else walks.

    About being aggressive, not to mention, avoiding the civil and/or criminal proceedings likely to come if one changes their personality from passive to aggressive (as so many do in WA) and injures someone. Dash and helmet cams are growing at a huge rate, and if you're caught on camera, you might be paying for your jerkiness for a very long time. Hitting the signal won't save you, prepare to be sued and to lose a lot.

  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,325

    What if driver assistance optional features of late sounded loud horns in the direction of the offending object instead of blinking lights at you on your dash or side mirror?

    I can understand some reasoning behind wanting loud exhaust to make sure if they don't see you, they can hear you. Some people are blind on the road.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    Modern cocoon Camrys and crossovers muffle that noise. Loud pipes types generally aren't the best trained riders, from my experience.

    Today's winner was a new 2014 style 911 turbo, I believe with "Army reserve" (I doubt you have to be a member to have them - probably a good way to encourage "discretion" by the Praetorian class) special plates and a license plate frame from a local high end shop that does a lot of electronics etc. Weaving in and out of traffic, going maybe double the limit, not signaling - the whole shebang. I suppose when you know you'll never pay the price, might as well have fun.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,752

    Well, you do know all they need do is flash the badge. Diplomatic Immunity is KQQL too. :D

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    I remember ages ago, driving on I5 near the Canadian border, and being passed by a then current MB C140 (big coupe) that was probably going 100++. I spotted that it had diplomatic plates. There's a community that produces very little of value, and creates huge expense and corruption.

    Nothing too dumb on the road today - worst were a few oblivious slowpokes, and the lack of signal use was irritating. For a time I was dreaming of a world devoid of CUVs, Camrys, Prius, and Corollas. I didn't honk once, I kept it under control. America!

  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,632

    Personally, my CUV is the perfect mode of transport for my current situation and am very happy with it. A shame the mileage figures couldn't be about 25% better, but that's part of the whole package when purchasing such a vehicle...am sure most SUV's are even worse! But right now, this vehicle works for me and after driving my kid's sub compact the last few days, I know I made the right decision here!

    The Sandman :) B)

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,520
    edited May 19

    You can't hear "loud pipes" if they are behind you on a freeway. The best defense for a motorcycle is a) a very bright headlight and b) not to be an idiot. It doesn't matter whether one is right or wrong in a bike-car confrontation. The bike always loses. I am amazed how thoroughly bad many motorcycles riders are. They don't know what they're doing, but they think they do.

    My favorite bike gripe is the one where you see a bike gaining on you at a rapid pace, well above freeway speed limits. So you signal to let them pass but they swerve to pass you on the right WITHOUT any signal.

    Death wish.

    And don't get me started on "gorilla bars" vs. bike control.

    MODERATOR

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391

    Oh, my.... I nearly spaced the sharing of a real gem from Saturday!

    So, I decided to do a little community service with my children after we participated in the "Heartwalk" Saturday morning. We ran an errand or two after that morning event, then headed home to grab the ATV trailer (little 8x8 tilt bed) so that we could pick up some piles of rubbish collected by another group of volunteers a couple weeks prior on a large empty lot in the town's shopping district.

    This all starts out rather blase. We stopped at the site and initially loaded a large contingent of errant shopping carts onto the trailer to deliver them back to their home stores (some of which were a mile+ away!). After loading up and heading out, I had to laugh at all the looks from people not quite sure what they were seeing as this little raspberry Fiesta made its way down the road with a trailer full of shopping carts! But, we dropped them off at all their stores without incident.

    Then, we head back to the site and do a little off-roading to get to the site of the pile of trash bags left by this group (apparently with the intention that somebody else, presumably scheduled, would pick them up? I didn't want to wait for the next wind storm to come along and spread all this work out across the property again). We loaded it all up, including a mangled shopping cart, bike frame, and other oddities. I put the cargo net and some straps over it all so we could safely drive a few miles away to the transfer site.

    Still, everything is going very smoothly and drama-free. Then, as we near our destination, we have to make two usually-simple turns. The first is a left turn from a four-lane divided highway onto a four-lane undivided feeder road, and the second is a near-immediate (about 100' from the intersection) right onto a two-lane frontage road. As we drove in the left lane of the divided highway toward the left turn lane, I can see a white gen 1 Subaru Forester behind us, literally riding our tail - I mean like tap-the-brakes-and-it-bumps-us close. I didn't think too much of it.

    We get to the left lanes and take the right one because we are making this immediate right to the frontage road. The Forester stays behind us. On green, we make the turn and signal to turn onto the frontage road along with two vehicles ahead of us. At this point, the Forester drives off into the sandy shoulder, kicking up all sorts of dust, and nearly loses control of his car as he drops into the ditch and launches (yes, the front of this guy's car left the ground) out of it onto the frontage road right where I would have been after making the turn had I not slammed on the brakes (which I nearly didn't do until all the dust caught my eye and I realized what was happening).

    Now, there isn't a clear roadway ahead. There are two cars ahead of the Forester (who is now ahead of me) and several cars coming the other direction. A little confused as to what was so urgent, I made the universal sign for "huh?" as the car straightened out in front of me, at which point the passenger discreetly offered up an apologetic wave (as if to say, "Sorry! But, hey, at least you don't have to ride with this maniac!"). Thankfully, nobody was hurt and the guy didn't pull into the transfer site just ahead, so I was able to simply move on with my day and chalk that one up as an "idiots will be idiots" move.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,320

    Around here, the grocers pay $2.00 a buggy that is collected & returned to the store. The grocers are Safeway and Fred Meyer. A local retired teacher is usually the collector with his PU, knowing where most of the abandoned buggies will be.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391

    Wow. I am not sure that would fly in these parts. You would get drifters taking them away only to bring them back a few days later requesting their reward!

    I think we returned about fifteen of them, mostly Safeway, but with a couple from Sam's Club and one from Michael's for good measure.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    If I had a store, I think I'd ban people who leave their carts in the middle of the lot rather than returning them to the collection points. One offense, and you're done. There's really no excuse. I am sure removing a cart is actually considered theft, but isn't enforced.

    This morning featured the usual score of people holding a phone and texting/talking while "driving". It also seems the amount of PSAs on TV for distracted driving has vanished. Why can't this be enforced with an unmarked car and a decent quality dashcam? I saw at least 3 LEOs just kind of hanging around (not in a vehicle or on a bike, chatting) at construction sites - I hope the well connected pseudo-private sector contractor/inherited empire property developer pays for that, and not the taxpayer.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,320

    @xwesx said: Wow. I am not sure that would fly in these parts. You would get drifters taking them away only to bring them back a few days later requesting their reward!

    I think we returned about fifteen of them, mostly Safeway, but with a couple from Sam's Club and one from Michael's for good measure.

  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,320

    Safeway & Freddies only pay their single contract cart chaser the $2.00, thus preventing the drifter trying to claim their reward.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391

    @euphonium said: Safeway & Freddies only pay their single contract cart chaser the $2.00, thus preventing the drifter trying to claim their reward.

    Oh, gotcha. That makes more sense. So, the contractor gets $2/cart and pays the drifters $0.50 per cart to help send them astray. :p

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,063

    In a 45 zone on a main road, a silver Prius pulls out instead of waiting in the driveway to a residence. I was close enough he should have waited. Then putts along without speeding up quickly. I flashed my brights at him so he procedes to slow down quickly from his 30 mph instead of accelerating.

    Then he turns left off the road into a small side road with lots of residences. I'll have to look for his car to see if he lives at the first house or lives down the side street.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563
    edited May 22

    Not too bad today - was going ~50 in the right lane of a 40, being tailgated by a rented Optima - driver had a tight two handed death grip at 1130-1230, odd driving style. I am guessing maybe from NJ or MA. I turned off the road before anything happened, amused me more than annoyed me, because of the tense driving style. Also saw a ML make a left turn from a straight lane, and a woman in a Focus blow through an occupied crosswalk - both moves define Bellevue, along with the typical glut of phone holding "drivers".

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563
    edited May 24

    This afternoon, got behind a young woman in a late 90s Civic EX coupe. She'd accelerate very slowly, but eventually get up to speed, where she'd then slowly start veering right, then correct, then go right again. Why would someone do this? Playing with their phone/tablet, of course.

    Also got to sit through a light sequence because a dopey useless CUV (maybe a RAV4) dawdled at a light, so 3 cars got through when maybe 10 were waiting. Probably a phone involved, too. Also saw a couple of crosswalk crowders, one I shouted at as I was in the crosswalk. Enforcement? That's up to "discretion".

  • eliaselias Posts: 1,903

    thanks, finny.

    us metro/city drivers see texting drivers 10 or 100 times per day.

    we probably need a forum specifically about texting while driving.
    there's gotta be one here on edmunds already, eh? i'll search later...

    but in the meantime, i notice both age and gender bias in my observations of "obvious texting-while-driving". Specifically: - It's mostly young drivers who text while driving. - It's mostly female drivers who text while driving.

    QUESTION: what to do in densepack/stop-and-go traffic when a tailgating texter will not look up, and its unsafe to change lanes due to varying lane-speeds? this specific situation has happened to me twice in recent weeks. both times in the left lane on highway.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,752
    edited May 24

    @elias said: thanks, finny.

    us metro/city drivers see texting drivers 10 or 100 times per day.

    we probably need a forum specifically about texting while driving.
    there's gotta be one here on edmunds already, eh? i'll search later...

    but in the meantime, i notice both age and gender bias in my observations of "obvious texting-while-driving". Specifically: - It's mostly young drivers who text while driving. - It's mostly female drivers who text while driving.

    QUESTION: what to do in densepack/stop-and-go traffic when a tailgating texter will not look up, and its unsafe to change lanes due to varying lane-speeds? this specific situation has happened to me twice in recent weeks. both times in the left lane on highway.

    I'd say ID the texting driver (broader category) sooner, and/ get out from behind them earlier. Or if your ID biases are true, do not get behind a young and/or young and female driver/s, who are (in your view) most likely to be texting (specific to your rating bias/es).

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    I can agree with your texting observations, although the PC police might whine. For plain old phone holders/yappers, it is probably a 50/50 split - but when it comes to actively texting, I notice one group doing it more than others, the same group you mention.

    Regarding the tailgater, maybe hit your hazards or rear fog light if you have one, something to wake them up? Or a quick couple brake taps, not enough to really slow down, just to catch their eye.

    @elias said: thanks, finny.

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,623

    As far as I'm concerned, texting while driving should be a felony.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    Given the overloaded state of our somewhat misguided incarceration system, I don't know if a felony would work well, but I can support steep fines, and make them progressive.

    Today I saw a woman in a minivan who seemed to be driving a little "off", I think it was simple slowness. She was tending to a little dog - that has to be as bad as yapping or texting.

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,752

    Almost anything electronic is getting or already is available for vehicle applications. I think the over all picture is not even close to curbing abuses that lead to distraction accidents. Indeed it would appear the current trajectory is to INCREASE the chances OF distraction accidents.

  • eliaselias Posts: 1,903
    edited May 25

    evidently various attempts at statistical sampling lead to the same results about age&gender of the texting drivers.

    thanks fintail re the ideas re how to handle the tailgating texters. i will consider those but would worry about trying either one since tapping brakes unnecessarily is considered a component of a aggressive-driving locally. and driving with flashers active is usually a civil violation unless one is driving below speed limit in which case they are required, iirc. maybe that's the solution, drive 44 mph on highway in right lane, with flashers to alert the texters... .

    public transportation drivers are too-often texting too. (this week, one of them drove her bus halfway off the side of bridge outside boston. bunch of injuries. witnesses reported she was texting.)

  • eliaselias Posts: 1,903
    edited May 25

    king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,752
    edited May 25

    @elias said: king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

    The back story, given the so called FAR data

    http://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx

    are the BEST safety records (NHTSA), ever since they have been recording these things !!!!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    I'd think a quick couple taps that don't markedly impact speed wouldn't be a problem. Civil violation - who cares. Going 61 in a 60 is also a violation, etc. I don't think even the most militant detached from reality ticket writing professional would chase you down for a 20 second application of hazards. In the long run, the best solution is probably going to be front and rear view cameras to record everything, in the event a settlement is needed.

    There have been incidents of both bus and train drivers causing problems due to distraction. I still say the penalties are too low - give them teeth and actually enforce them (I don't believe for a second what the local law enforcement community claims about tickets given - I seriously want an independent outside audit), and it might have an impact.

    Texting is much more of a danger than simple yapping too, IMO. Both are bad, but not equal.

    @elias said: evidently various attempts at statistical sampling lead to the same results about age&gender of the texting drivers.

    thanks fintail re the ideas re how to handle the tailgating texters. i will consider those but would worry about trying either one since tapping brakes unnecessarily is considered a component of a aggressive-driving locally. and driving with flashers active is usually a civil violation unless one is driving below speed limit in which case they are required, iirc. maybe that's the solution, drive 44 mph on highway in right lane, with flashers to alert the texters... .

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    Some of those stats seem fishy - as I believe overall accidents are going down even with what must be smartphone market saturation. It's kind of tough. I think stupid incidents that don't necessarily cause accidents are rising - those need to be fought, too. I wouldn't doubt if pedestrian incidents with driver fault are rising, too. Being inconsiderate doesn't only mean crashing.

    @elias said: king, i understand believe the stats indicate that a growing percentage of accidents are caused by distractions, usually smartphones, tvs in the cars, video screens on the dashboard.

    iirc, i've seen some stats which indicate that pre-smartphones & pre-texting, about 10% of accidents were due to distracted driving, and now it's >90% .

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,563

    Fun in the morning - saw a woman deal with a crosswalk crowding guy in a rental Altima, saw a woman in a late model Lexus GX take a "free" turn in front of oncoming traffic who had green, got to dodge a couple crosswalk crowders/commercial driveway non-lookers while on foot, and the only cops I saw were hanging around construction sites. Didn't see any texters or yappers.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,686

    Yesterday (Memorial Day) I saw the driver in a black Patriot tap his cigarette out the window several times... then finally toss the butt out the window. Not very patriot-ic, but definitely inconsiderate.

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