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What is the status of a 1983 Hurst Olds? Could we consider it as a classic, or simply a coupe?

andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,617
edited March 7 in Oldsmobile
to call any 1983 car a classic.

2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

Comments

  • badtoybadtoy Posts: 368
    The fact that it's a special edition muscle car and the low production numbers make it a classic, I believe. What they're pulling in the market right now I don't know, but I seem to remember that they were considered a very attractive buy.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,796
    I don't think it will ever be a "classic", since it is a modified mass produced car, but it is somewhat of a "collectible". Probably in show condition you could maybe get $10K or so, which is pretty good for any 1980s car. So it has some "pull" in the collector car market, for a narrow range of buyers who are interested in them. It's a car you could probably buy right and get your money out of later on.

    MODERATOR

  • robokidrobokid Posts: 1
    Well, regarding the 1983 Hurst, the least I care for is its market value "monetary sum".
    I think that such a car is much more than a price tag, especially that I never encountered any problem with it..(Which I never anticipated)..
    I consider installing Headers and side pipes to improve performance, however, I don't know what are the best products to fit to it.
    Any advise is highly appreciated.
    ROBOKID
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,796
    I think if you're going to improve "what goes out" you'd also have to think about what "goes in", such an intake and fuel system improvements. If the engine can't breath better, it doesn't much matter how you exhaust it, especially with catalytics.

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,954
    ...between the Hurst Olds and the 4-4-2 edition that they also offered on the G-body in the '80's? All I know is that both had an HO 307 4-bbl with 180 hp, and one (maybe both?) had a funky shifter.

    I always liked these cars, because they're comparatively rare compared to the SS Montes and Regal T-types and GNs that seem to proliferate. I always wondered why Pontiac never really tried to offer a performance edition of the Grand Prix back then. Sure there was that 2+2 thing they had, but it only had a stock 305-4bbl with 150 hp...the same engine you'd get in any garden-variety V-8 GP or Monte.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    The '79 H/O was one of the last of the Cutlass downsized bodies to use a true Oldsmobile 350. I know as I had the opportunity to buy one new and opted for a Calais (rear wheel drive) with a Chevy 305 instead. Just one of many stupid choices in my younger years. The Calais was great except for the engine.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,954
    I was thinking more along the lines of the more aerodynamic '81-88 style, where for a few years they had a Hurst and for a few years they had a 4-4-2. Was Oldsmobile the only division to use a 350 in their downsized intermediates? I've seen Cutlasses with 350's, but it seems the biggest engine (stock, at least) that I've seen in Montes, Malibus, LeManses, GP's, Centurys and Regals of '78-79 are 301's or 305's.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    The '78-'79 Cutlasses were great cars. You could keep one running forever if you really tried.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,954
    ...were great cars, as long as you got one with an Olds engine. I had an '82 with the Buick 231, which was ready to self-destruct around the 73K mark. In all fairness, it had 61K on it when I bought it, and I only paid $800 for it, and God only knows how well it had been taken care of by the previous owner.

    I used to joke that if that car had had the 307, I'd still be driving it today! Weeeellll, maybe not. I've put about 185,000 miles on various cars since then, and totaled one of them, so I'm sure that, regardless of engine, it'd probably be junkyard fodder by now!
  • badtoybadtoy Posts: 368
    Hurst Cutlasses in 83, so they are pretty rare. How desirable is a matter of speculation, since they had nothing near the performance of the late 60s and early 70s.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,679
    More of a decal package than anything else. Those were the dark days when emission regulations were choking the cars too.
  • leadfoot4leadfoot4 Posts: 593
    Just happened to have one of these cars a few years back, and just happened to have a 455 Olds engine out of one of his previous project cars. It was a match made in heaven.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,954
    ...to the '82 Cutlass Supreme I had. The body on the car was in great shape, but the Buick 231 was shot. At the time though, I also had a '69 Bonneville with a 400-4bbl, that had a great driveline but a bad body. I've always wondered what that 400 would've been like transplanted into that Cutlass.

    I looked up some stats in my auto encyclopedia, looks like the Hurst was only offered in '83-84, and then it was called 4-4-2 from '85-87. The hp of the 307 was rated at 180 hp, same as the 305 in the Monte SS. One little aberration I noticed though...for '87, the 307 dipped down to 170 hp, although the 305 didn't. I guess maybe some new emissions controls were added that year, that the 307 didn't take as well to?
  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    Someone posted a link here to a web site on Olds engines and I kind of remember something about the heads being changed the last few years.
  • force98force98 Posts: 81
    Only offered '83-'84 in the Hurst car; deleted for the 4-4-2 model. Even though HP was down due to EPA, the car was fairly quick for its time at about 8 seconds 0-60.

    I personally like the look of that car, but much prefer my '70 Cutlass with dual-gate shifter and big block ram-air 455.

    Now the '69 Hurst/Olds--that was a car! I plan on owning one some day.

    Good site for those interested:
    http://www.442.com/
This discussion has been closed.