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Buick Park Avenue Maintenance & Repair

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  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,048
    edited April 2013
    >Is your manual hard copy or electronic - if electronic is there a way to screen shot and post or send via email?

    That might be an advantage to seeing if your local library does have AllData access. From what I recall the few times I used AllData at the library, their troubleshooting steps seemed to parallel the factory service manuals from GM printer by Helminc.com

    You might price the FSM at that website ($200 + shipping). They offer paper and digital versions for some cars--but the digital versions cover many vehicles and are even more expensive unless you're a shop needing to cover that many vehicles.

    I'd suggest looking on eBay for used FSM manuals. One caveat is to be sure you know how many volumes are in the set, e.g., 2 or 3. A few people put up one volume and you need all the parts. My 2003 FSM is 3 volumes. AND it needs to be the actual Helm FSM.

    Here is one. Appears to be the full correct set. Priced extraordinarily well. If I wanted them I'd Buy It Now for $27.99 and pay extra for fast shipping. Others are asking 2.5 times that price.

    Only note, is on the 1998 leSabre manuals, Helm issued a replacement set with ID to that effect stamped diagonally across the covers. They appeared on my doorstep with notice a year or two after I bought the originals from Helm.
    It said there had been some updates inside--I never saw anything different.
    It makes good reading about how things work as well as troubleshooting.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/SET-1998-BUICK-PARK-AVENUE-Service-Manual-VOL-1-2-3-ELEC- - - TRICAL-ENGINE-BRAKE-/350583208811?pt=Motors_Manuals_Literature&hash=item51a0633b- - - 6b&vxp=mtr#ht_1443wt_676

    Greasy fingerprints won't affect the inside. I have some old manuals for 67 Mustang and 77 Cutlass with lots of prints...
  • spritemanspriteman Posts: 25
    So - it's been about a month since I replaced my IM gaskets and cleaned the heck out of that engine. I had strained the oil that was in the engine when the gaskets failed and changed the oil filter. The idea being that in a month I would change both.

    Put the Mobil 1 extended mileage 10w-30 synthetic and the matching filter from Mobil.

    Also, installed a new fuel filter so all of those clean injectors have nice clean gas. Anyone have an issue with the clip side of the fuel filter weeping a little around the connection? It's not a lot of gas - just enough to make the plastic clip wet.

    And, lastly, changed out the oil pressure sender that had failed before the IM gasket failure. By the way - if anyone else is going to attempt this I wound up jacking the car up and working from the right front wheel area. I removed the wheel and the splash guard. This enables you to reach to oil pressure sender from the side and get a wrench on it. I suggest using a 28 mm (check size) box end ratchet wrench to make to job a lot easier.

    Oil pressure on my base 1998 BPA is now a solid 60 psi while cruising or accelerating. When I hit the brakes fairly hard you can see the psi drop into the low to mid 30's. All looks normal and I think I should have another 100K miles out of the old BPA.

    Spriteman Out!
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,048
    >Anyone have an issue with the clip side of the fuel filter weeping a little around the connection?

    Was the o-ring in place on the line when you put on the new filter? I still haven't done mine--have to get a 16 mm flare wrench--but the person at the Zone reminded me to watch that o-ring. If it is left off, then I'd have a leak he told me.
  • spritemanspriteman Posts: 25
    edited April 2013
    To be honest I didn't notice if there was an o-ring. I did a look-up at gmpartsgiant for the parts diagram - it does show an o-ring on the hex fitting side but not on the clip side of the fuel filter. Is the o-ring inside the hex fitting? I didn't see the o-ring on the flared end of the fuel line coming from the engine side which connects to the hex fitting.

    The strange thing is that it seems to be weeping from the clip side of the fuel filter - where the diagram does not show an o-ring. I'm going to go down to autozone and see if they can lend a hand identifying where the o-ring should be and why the clip side of the fuel filter might be leaking.
  • steve1216steve1216 Posts: 1
    I have a 1998 with 60K on it. Lately my transmission has begun to jerk when shifting from 1-2 and 2-3. There's no noise involved, just a hard jerk where a smooth shift should be. My mechanic insists that there's nothing wrong with the car, but it seems to me that it shouldn't be jerking like this. Also- for the first five minutes or so of driving the shifts are smooth. Thanks for any help anyone could offer!
  • So, picked up this '91 PA cheap, lots of miles but good shape. The heater/AC blower isn''t putting out the air it should so while doing other engine work I removed the blower fan. I found the fan housing was coated with a greasy residue which also covers the heater core and evaporator. My intention is to access the heater core and evaporator from inside and using compressed air and alcohol back blow the fins. So, I have proceeded as if replacing the heater core which is not covered very well at all by the usual manuals. Looking for feedback from anyone who has done the job.
  • Sup folks, after the many many pages of reading a lot of very helpful and occasionally difficult processes I decided to add my story as well and some history. I have been the proud owner of two '93 buick lesabre customs, ran them in the ground as every car should be(old age caught them both around 300k miles and 10 years of owning each). I tend to buy used cars and when a lawyer decided to sell his 1998 park avenue ultra supercharger for 1k(due to mostly his rocker son who drove it before was not gentle with it and wanted a real sports car). To my disgust a year later after I found such a beauty(only had to perform minor replacements on it) I found myself facing down a full blown preggo deer and she took out my hood, passenger light, and radiator....or so I thought. I was happy to have found out she had only destroyed the "coolant amount sensor" or whatever it may be. After securing the shattered sensor back(hot glue works wonders), I raced off to the junkyards. Now a more challenging part to my quest, come to find out a man with the same make, model, and color had done the same thing! So the old badger got to most of our salvage yards and acquired(to my disgust) exact color parts...... On with the story... If you are not familiar with the park avenue's rarity when it comes to salvage yards you will find out(unless you're in some hugely populated area). The Buick was reborn! Purple body and a white hood(quite hilarious most people think I am a cop on the highway!). Here comes the wisdoms I have learned from this beast, my apologies for the prelude to the point.. I believe it is 97+ perhaps 98+ park avenues, I welcome you to the painful idea of Electric parts and Irritating little devices no bigger then your thumb that will cost you at least that whole hand the thumb is attached to! If you are having issues regarding say AC is flowing on windshield and floorboard you are looking at an acuitors(I may be misspelling that) 9/10 times that's it, and lets hope that you did have just the simple 3 phillips screws to remove rather then someone's son who stripped 2/3 and replaced the other with a random screw! Prices vary, and honestly I can deal with the weather rather then shell out 85-300 dollars for such a small device, that I quote "has to be calibrated by a Buick dealership" aka be ready to hand over two legs with that hand for the part + calibration. I also see alot of people dealing with overheating issues-- When it comes to this the factory fan settings are way way high... ex: The radiator fans don't kick on til 215 degrees roughly...Lame eh? Quick fix, and old school the way I like it, there are two fixes to this. One requires you to have an OBD(pda dealy that connects to the brain of your buick and commands it to do your bidding once you figure out how to write scripts) or...plain and simple pull the thermostat. I have had many classic cars, and a few newer, I thoroughly enjoy running the highway speed limit(here its 75) and knowing at 90 degrees outside that my temperature will not exceed about 130. I was having the overheating issue from day one, sometimes from stop and go traffic, other times just general highway. I replaced copper thermostat, ripped out my thermostat, and ever since I have had zero issues with my temperature. It slightly kills my heater for the first 5-10 mins in winter, but hey! Guess what!? Ya got seat warmers... The other little nuisance I have found with these vehicles aside from all the expensive gizmos, is the window seals and well of course(never fails) buicks just are an attractor for getting cracked windshields! I have had few other issues with this little beast(knock on wood). I noticed also a fellow talking about jerking with transmission, just from my meager experience with tinkering(yes yes I am no mechanical brainiac!) that often in times when it jerks shifting despite on originally smooth take offs, I suggest your transmission housing that connects to your engine be inspected along with motor mounts, and transmission mounts. Never hurts for you to learn how to pull your transmission pan and how to swap that filter out, occasionally you might be so un-lucky to find metal shavings or lollipops in there...yes that latter part was a joke. Also in just mentioning that, sometimes your emission system(had a 91 trans am that did this) can choke your car aka replacing your catalytic converter. These are truly amazing cars, the buick breed, and easily found cheaply...however learning them is like learning a woman, once you think you know one thing about her she'll flip on ya! I'll be looking into getting an OBD or OBD2, and currently learning how to fine tune my supercharger...if anyone has some great guides for the supercharger would love it.... Oh yea and if someone could tell me the easiest way to ducktape or superglue my same ac issue will take that as well, to the fellow who uses a pair of vice grips..kudos, I bow to you.

    Yours Truly & The Purple Beast Mistaken As A Highway Patrol, FearedDark & '98 Park Ave

  • Just found the greatest trick(thought it was a joke) if your gas gauge does not work, with your vehicle off -> take a agriculture sized magnet(fairly big one) put it up to the gauge and rotate counter clockwise it will put it to the reset position! Sadly another fail...mine is behind the needle to allow it to reset...off I go to tear a dashboard apart! Cheers!

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,048

    @feareddark said: Just found the greatest trick(thought it was a joke) if your gas gauge does not work, with your vehicle off take a agriculture sized magnet(fairly big one) put it up to the gauge and rotate counter clockwise it will put it to the reset position!

    Some people have drilled a small hole through the plastic cover where they could insert a paper clip bent appropriately and use that to lift the needle of the stop post to the correct side of the post.

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