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How to find a quality salesperson

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  • rroyce10rroyce10 Posts: 9,359
    .... I forgot to mention ...

    That "is" the #1 reason for turnover in this business .....

    Terry.
  • In the begining of your career, yes you have to do the 60-70 hour work week. I would always laugh at the GPs who would leave right on time on the early shift, and ask when they could have a day off.

    Now that I am more established and more organized (I am using that term loosly) I work my shifts, unless I have an appointment or I sell a car late. I have noticed, sitting watching an empty parking lot while I should be off does not make me sell anymore cars. It stills equates to about 50 hours a week.

    Until I started working HI-Line, I did not have much of a social or love life. Some guys had a problem with the hours and me working with all guys. Its a hard business for young people these days (I am not old though) because of the theory of "instantanious gratification" because alot of the real young GPs expect to make 10k their first month w/out putting any work into it.
  • jlawrence01jlawrence01 Posts: 1,828
    Its a hard business for young people these days (I am not old though) because of the theory of "instantanious gratification" because alot of the real young GPs expect to make 10k their first month w/out putting any work into it.

    I think that it is a hard realization (or rude awakening) for a lot of young people that "being successful" in any business rarely is a 9-5 proposition. (That is also a reason why I don't sit and worry whether or not I will have a job next year.)

    You have to be there when the customer is available.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    Hi guys I'm back on edmunds after my 6 month absence. Good to see familiar names still around.

    I switched dealerships, but then came back to my original one, dad had leukemia, and he beat it for now; and I got engaged to my sweetie which I met when she bought a car from me 1 year ago! So I was quite busy!

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    Welcome back boomcheck. Glad to hear your dad is o.k as well as your sweetie agreeing to marry you.

    I asked out a girl who sold me my second vehicle. I picked her up at her house to go out on a date, and her 4 year old son said, "My mommy doesn't want to go out with you". Well... he was right. I called her back after the first date. She said she was getting back with her former boyfriend. :blush:
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    thanks

    I met my fiance through her then boyfriend. He bought a car from our dealership but I ended up helping him cause he didn't like the salesman he dealt with. Then he brought my now fiance in who bought her car, then they brought her dad in who also bought a car from me, and finally her then boyfriend brought in 3 of his friends in the course of 6 months who also bought cars from me. They ended up breaking up, and the rest is history. We hooked up last October and got engaged in mid September this year. ;)

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • Now that is funny.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    Yeah, what was funnier is going to her house and seeing her dad. A little akward at first, switching from the salesman mode to "I'm dating your daughter mode"

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • jnealjneal Posts: 247
    Isn't that carrying the concept of "Service After the Sale" a bit far?? :D
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    She's the one that contacted me, and started flirting with me. Trying to hook up with customers is usually not my thing. But it happens in the business every once in a while.

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • Someone trying to revive this topic???
  • madmanmoomadmanmoo Posts: 2,039
    Lol, this guy is just trying to advertise sites. Fun stuff. Keep it up, Stick. Good luck in your new ventures!
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    I guess nobody has a problem finding a quality salesperson anymore.

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • jmbkljjmbklj Posts: 19
    How can I choose my sales person? All too often when I visit a dealership, I am approached immediately by someone, and it may be someone I don't appreciate doing business with. Then I'm stuck with whoever approached me first. How can I choose who will receive that commission? Since I am the customer, how can I choose who to do business with? Is that possible? I don't really have friends who bought the brand of car I want to ask for a referral.

    I don't like overbearing pushy sales people - the kind you think about from years past. Unfortunately, in my town, they still exist and sometimes their supervisors are even worse than the sales rep, so speaking to one of those supervisors can be unpleasant. What's unfortunate is the largest dealership with the largest selection of cars I want to buy still uses some of those old school tactics. I dread walking in there. Even making a phone call can be unpleasant and a long drawn out process, when all I have is one simple question to be ansered. For the model I want to buy, do you have any 2008 vehicles yet? A simple yes or no was all that I was looking for. No wonder people prefer to deal over the internet!

    But back to the real question, how can I choose the sales person I'd like to work with?
  • madmanmoomadmanmoo Posts: 2,039
    Imo, I think this is one of the most important parts of your car purchase. Most of the complaints about sales are not the cars.....it's the people! So wouldn't you want to test drive your salesman as well?

    Here's my advice. Call into the dealership. Have a conversation with one of the salesguys and let them know what you're looking to purchase. You should be able to read a lot about those folks from that phone call. Are they kind? Patient? Knowledgeable?

    If you simply walk into the showroom, you run the risk of talking to someone you may not like or want to work with.

    Great question!

    -Moo
  • mako1amako1a VirginiaPosts: 1,750
    I think she's saying how do I dump the bad one without the new one having to split the deal. Giving the guy she wants to work with a fresh up with no split (possibly better for her).

    2013 Mustang GT, 2006 Silverado 2500 LT HD, 2001 GMC Yukon Denali

  • madmanmoomadmanmoo Posts: 2,039
    I actually scanned a little too quickly. I didn't see that she didn't like the phone call approach either. I think it's the best though. You don't have to be married to that salesperson, if you don't like him, you can hang up.

    I really think that's a great approach to finding a salesman that you like.

    It maybe in her (?) presentation as well. If you call up a dealer and ask if they have a specific model, take that time to see if you would like to work with that salesman as well. Don't make it too hard!

    -Moo
  • bobstbobst Posts: 1,783
    It is probably easier to change your car-buying method then it is to find the perfect sales person.

    I used to have a hard time with car sales people. I changed my method and now I love dealing with them.

    Remember, you are there to get your questions answered, not to answer their questions. Therefore, you can ignore any of the questions you are asked.

    Don't ever argue with a sales person. If you don't like the sales person, walk away and talk to someone else. No explanation needed.

    If you have a definite plan when you go to the car dealer, you will enjoy the experience much more.
  • jmbkljjmbklj Posts: 19
    bobst, you are so right. Whether it's on the phone or in person, they like to drill you with questions when all they need to know is that a) I have no trade in, and b) there will be no financing, and c) that is how I bought my last 3 vehicles so I am not blowing smoke. I am upfront about the business details for the transaction so I hate it when they ask other questions about my life. It has no bearing on the business transaction. I am not there to make a new friend.

    I appreciate everyone's comments and suggestions. :)
  • micosilvermicosilver Posts: 212
    I think referral is the best way to find a salesperson.
    Ask your friends, family, go online to the specific brand forums - get a recommendation in any way you can.
    Make sure the salesperson knows you have been referred and by whom.
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 6,675
    "...how can I choose the sales person I'd like to work with?..."

    Well you can line all the sales staff up against the wall and go down the line and slap each one in the face.

    If the person slaps you back you don't want that one. He/she is obviously too aggressive. This salesperson won't give an inch in negotiations. :mad:

    If the person starts to cry and falls to the floor you don't want that salesperson either. He/she has no backbone and won't fight with the Sales Manager to get you a good deal. :cry:

    You want the salesperson who raises his/her hand to strike you and then pauses and says: "If you take the extended warranty you can slap me again!" This is a person who wants to make a deal. ;)

    Or you could just do what Bobst said.

    2009 PT Cruiser, 2008 Eclipse, 1995 Mark VIII, 1988 GMC Van

  • madmanmoomadmanmoo Posts: 2,039
    Excellent advice. We have actually just incorporated this into our meet and greet. Unfortunately, some of the greenpeas have realized what it takes to be chosen. Obviously we need to tweak the system.

    We now use a battery and two clamps attached to each salesman's nipples. People can realize true pain now. And we actually see who has the backbone and who wants the deal.

    Good business for sure.

    -Moo
  • british_roverbritish_rover Posts: 8,476
    Oddly I was just threatening this to a co-worker the other week.

    I wasn't going to just attach them to his nipples though. :mad:
  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    Oddly I was just threatening this to a co-worker the other week

    Anytime there is someone wanting to attach a set of battery cables onto another mans pills ( :cry: ) ... there has got to be a good story behind it?
  • british_roverbritish_rover Posts: 8,476
    Not really just my old UPS management personality bleeding through when I get frustrated with someone who should have been let go long ago.
  • 1racefan1racefan Posts: 932
    We had a sales guy approach us as soon as we got out of the car (which I hate), but he ended up being pretty good.

    We knew which model we wanted, but were a little unsure of the color and trim level. After getting in the first car for the test drive, the sales guy immediately asked 2 "qualifying questions" that I was able to shrug off. The first thing he asked was if we had a price range we were looking to be in, and I responded with, "No, we are just looking for a vehicle equipped with the things we feel to be most important.", and we proceeded to go over our list of got to have items.

    The second question he asked was what monthly payment I was looking for, and I responded with, "I am looking to buy a car, not a monthly payment. If you give me a great price, and the special financing offer from the manufacturer, I will get the monthly payment I want.".

    After this, he happened to make a comment about football, which started a friendly debate about which of our favorite teams was better, and a little friendly trash talk, and pretty much ended all of the qualifying questions. He really hustled, and opened up 5 different cars (color/trim combinations of the same model), and we were able to settle on 1 we liked. I guess the thing that impressed us the most, was that my wife was having a hard time deciding on a color. This guy drove us around his lot, even to the very back where some new cars had just come in to make sure she had seen every color/trim combination they had.

    When we went inside to negotiate, he found out my wife was in the medical field, and the whole conversation revolved around her giving him advice about a condition he was having. He pretty much just relayed offers back and forth between us and the sales manager, and he and I never actually debated. We really didn't even talk about the deal - mainly off topic stuff.

    I guess my point is that it seemed at first that this guy was going to be one canned line after the other (and I was even waiting for the 4 square to come out), but it ended up being a good experience. We didn't grind - worked out a deal in 15 minutes, and he will get all "excellents" on the survey (I promised him that before he even brought it up).
  • madmanmoomadmanmoo Posts: 2,039
    You ran into a good salesman. It's nice to have, huh?

    A good salesman MUST qualify a customer. It's his job. He knew he had a deal and stuck with it. His qualifying questions, though shrugged off by you, gave him all the information he needed. You were buying something!

    -Moo
  • british_roverbritish_rover Posts: 8,476
    Yup and after he confirmed you were a real buyer with the up front questions he broke all the ice and made you feel comfortable with the football questions.

    Do you have football stuff in your car or maybe a bumper sticker or did he just make a good guess?
  • joel0622joel0622 Posts: 3,302
    1. He greets you before your car stops moving, in doing this he shows that he is eager to help you. In the process he gives an elbow to the face of of one of his fellow sales people and trips another. This is just another sign of his eagerness to help and wants to ensure that you are not exposed to one of his less qualified co-workers.

    2. His dress: White paten leather shoes, wide white belt, dress slacks, a white shirt, and a tie with cars on it and a hint of the ravviolli sauce from lunch 3 days ago. But most important check out the amount of gold he has on. If he only has a wedding ring and nothing else, run, run away quick, he is obviously a failure at his chosen profession. Now if he has 4 rings, a gold bracelet, and enough gold necklaces to qualify as Mr. T starter kit then you have found your man.

    3. Conversation: Make sure he speaks only to you and does not even honor your wifes presence with a hello. But when he does eventually speak to her make sure he calls her, honey and darlin and only ask for her opinion when it comes to color. Every one knows buying a car is mans business and a women should not have to worry her pretty little head about it. Especially when you start talking about the money.

    4. Make 110% sure that within 5 minutes of you looking at the first car these words come out of his mouth, "If I could get you a great deal would you buy this car today" This needs to happen before the test drive, actually it is best if it happens before he ever gets a key to open the door. This shows he is eager to get you done quickly, we all know your time is valuable.

    5. After the sale: the way you will really know that you have found a winner and have been helped by the best they got is after the sale. When you get home you notice the floor mats are missing and you only got one key so you give him a call. After 3 days he does not return your calls. This shows that he is a great salesperson because he is helping so many customers in the manner he helped you that he does not even have time to call you.

    But here is the icing on the cake that proves you got the best in the biz. You go to the dealership to get your key and floor mats and when you pull up your professional salesperson greets you and says, "Welcome to Sell and Forget Motors can I help you"? That proves he is so intent on taking care of a new customer he can't even remember you.

    These are just a few of the things that show you how to get the best.

    * Oops the 80's just called me, they want there stereo type back. :D
  • joel0622joel0622 Posts: 3,302
    I forgot one other crucial point.

    His Business Card: Hopefully when you hands you his card it has the name of another salesperson scratched out and his name written in. This proves two things.

    1. He is trying to keep overhead for the store down by not wasting cards

    2. He is environmentally conscious.
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