Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Subaru Crew Problems & Solutions

1161162164166167640

Comments

  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    I agree with Subaru. Unless you hit something-- which honestly, I'm not sure how you would prove that you didn't-- I think that the original owner damaged the control arm and you'll have to foot the bill to fix it.

    Maybe Subaru will feel sorry for you and get you the part cheap, but I doubt the dealer will do much on the labor. Again, no one can prove their position here IMO, which leaves you unfortunately holding the bag.

    You'll never be able to prove that it bent during normal driving... and the statement alone seems hard to believe. There's a far higher probability that it bent because someone hit something. We don't have proof about anything, but consider the result and consider which is more likely: bent somehow due to defective part while travelling over normal roads, or it bent due to striking a roadhazzard of some kind (huge pothole, curb, etc). The control arm absolutely is designed to bend under stress, saving the unit body and other expensive / irreplacable bits.

    -Colin
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Not only that but if you look at my control arm that I bent, it doesn't even look scraped, cause the wheel took the pressure and transferred it to the control arm, it just creased in 1/2. I have to agree with Colin on this, you'll likely be stuck holding the bag.

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Tough call - it may not have been abuse, but even some debris on the road the driver thought was nothing at the time. Or imagine it was damaged before you bought it, and weakened, so the next pot hole you hit, even a small one, did the rest of the damage.

    I'm almost thinking your collision insurance ought to cover that type of thing, but it's so low it's probably less than your deductible.

    I'd shop wholesalers on line, or even check out junk yards that sell Subie parts, and get the parts cheap. Darlene's prices were about 15-20% below retail, so you can cut down that repair cost significantly.

    -juice
  • subaru_teamsubaru_team Posts: 1,676
    I posted a response on the general forum, but it is along the lines of Juice's comments.

    Once again, I'm sorry for the problem.

    Patti
  • tyguytyguy ColoradoPosts: 804
    Thanks for looking into the situation, Patti.

    BTW, what are you doing up so early? Go to sleep! :-)

    Ty
  • rbstechrbstech Posts: 5
    Hey Guys,
    I recently came into a 1998 Outback Auto with 61K.

    I drive quite a bit on dirt roads in upstate NY and twice in the last three days (Only on dirt roads)I've had this noise. Seems to be coming from the passenger side. It's a metallic grinding/vidration type noise. I'm not sure exactly where it is coming from. I was afraid it was the transmission but noise continued when I put tranny in neutral. It almost feels like the brakes on that side or maybe one wheel are engaged. I wsa able to make the problem go away 2 out of 3 times by stopping and engaging/releasing the parking brake. What seems to precipitate it is hitting a bump/pothole/puddle with the right/passenger side of the car. It really is a very scary noise. This only has occured once on Saturday and twice last night. Again, only on dirt roads. I also commute on a rough dirt road and it hasn't happened there (I tried).

    On another note I got the car on a Wednesday and Saturday the timing belt broke! But everything was cool. I really miss the 5-spd from my last car. The auto feels looser? Prolly the different AWD system.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated. Sorry about the long post.

    Gremlin
  • tyguytyguy ColoradoPosts: 804
    Wow! Subaru called that timing belt right. They recommend replacement at 60K, and yours broke at 61K. Good thing it's not an interference engine.

    I have two questions regarding the grinding noise:
    1. Would it go away if you tapped the brakes instead of stopping and engaging/releasing the parking break?
    2. Does the grinding noise increase in pitch the faster you go?
  • hypovhypov Posts: 3,068
    are' interference' engine :)

    -Dave
  • bluesubiebluesubie Posts: 3,497
    I have no idea, but I'll take a WAG and say a rock stuck in the brakes (caliper?).

    Anyone else?

    -Dennis
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    Gremlin,

    The first thing I would think of given your noise and the dirt roads would be a bit of gravel getting stuck between the dust shield and rotor.

    Rally drivers remove the dust shields, but then again they service their brakes more regularly than normal people. It's also possible you're hearing something else, noises are very difficult to troubleshoot remotely. If you tap the brake and the noise changes it's a pebble alright.

    -Colin
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    dennis, it seems great minds think alike. :-D

    -Colin
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Gremlin: could be a loose exhaust heat shield. Those rattle like crazy at certain frequency (could be engine rpm dependent).

    -juice
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    I thought the owner's manual called for 105K intervals for replacing the timing belt.

    Lots of dealers try to sell you the 60K replacement as preventative maintenance.

    Ken
  • armac13armac13 Posts: 1,129
    Timing belt replacement depends on model, year, and in some cases, location. California Subarus had 105k mile replacement before some other areas I believe. All current models are 105k replacement, 60k inspection IIRC.

    Ross
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    Earlier Subarus do require it changed at 60K. I don't know when the switch took place, or for what engines. I think the switch to 105K was fairly recent, perhaps within the last 5 years?

    Bob
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I think the 105K is actually 00 and newer IIRC across the board and maybe '97 and newer for 50-state emissions cars? Also the timing belt is covered to 100K miles on those that have a 105K interval because CA emissions requires it to be covered under warranty I think.

    my '88 and'91 XT6s are both 60K intervals, blew one at 75K the other has supposedly been replaced at 120K about7K miles ago so we'll see.

    -mike
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    I wonder if the timing belt material was changed to something more durable? If so, I wonder if the newer timing belts can be used on older Subies, thus increasing the length of future belt changes?

    Bob
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I believe you can get the "HD" version and put it on the older ones, obviously they need to be the same engine etc.

    -mike
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Ross,

    Didn't know that. The reason why I mentioned it was my 98 Forester (same engine as an 98 OB) has a 105K interval.

    Ken
    (in California)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yep, Darlene looked it up for us, Patti confirmed it, too. You have to inspect them at 90k, so I'll probably just do the swap at that point.

    -juice
  • rbstechrbstech Posts: 5
    Took car to my mechanic for the inspection (10 day was up) and on the way, had problem happen 3 times. It does/did vary pitch according to speed, and once going braking did not make it go away.

    He took it up the same dirt road and could not duplicate it. Put it on the lift, and he found part of the heat shield had bent up and had scraped a drive shaft, some paint was worn off. He pryed the shield back down and says there is 1/4 inch clearance now. I think/hope it is fixed, I pick it up in 3 hours

    Thanks,
    Gremlin
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Bingo, I nailed it. Not a bad call, eh? :-)

    -juice
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    You got lucky. ;-)

    Some of the heat shields have been removed from my car though for that reason.

    -Colin
  • rbstechrbstech Posts: 5
    If it comes back, Bruce will cut it off. Had to remove heat shields on my Mitsu Expo and Colt Vista but of course, they weren't touching a drive shaft. :)

    Gremlin
  • storytellerstoryteller Posts: 476
    Click and clack have been diagnosing tricky car problems on the radio without seeing the car, and now you are doing it on Edmunds posts! Way to go.
  • lark6lark6 Posts: 2,565
    And juice doesn't even have that annoying laugh! ;-)

    Ed (has been on Car Talk)
  • rbstechrbstech Posts: 5
    Have a slight groove in the shaft, probly not enought to be trouble.

    Gremlin
  • Hello,
    This is my first post here. I'm upgrading to 17 inch wheels/tires. Subaru recomends 215/45r17.
    Will 225/45r17's fit without rubbing?
    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    chris
  • nypaulnypaul Posts: 35
    OK now, let's hear it from those folks who have actually gone 100,000 on a timing belt with no problems. Guess I'm just from the old school that said timing belts get changed at 60k. The thought of 100k on a timing belt makes me uncomfortable.
    Have any of you actually gone 100k? What condition was the belt in when removed? Did it look like it was about to fail or was there still a safe margin of life left in it?

    Paul
Sign In or Register to comment.