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Subaru Crew Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    if synthetic flows better I should go right to 10W40 and forget 10W30. Realistically, I will go to 10W30 soon and maybe next year I will move to 10W40. My knocking is either the bearings or solid lifter(s).

    Monica - Sometimes I think the more I take care and worry about my cars, the more things go wrong. Case in point - I am being very careful with the tires on the OB (rotations, pressure, etc) and I now have my third leak in 2 years. I don't think I have had 3 leaks in 20+ years of driving. I'm still young, really.

    Greg
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I have a belt that squeels right when I start the (extremely cold) Forester. Of course it's too cold for me to check it out, adjust the belt tension, and of course it might go away if it warms up. What do you folks think?

    She's running beautifully, no other symptoms.

    -juice
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    I wouldn't worry. If it running good, let it be.

    Greg
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    1st: see if you can trace where it's coming from. Might be an exhaust heat shield or something simple to fix.

    Does it only happen when it's cold? I bet the extreme cold has made certain metals contract more than usual, too.

    I don't think it's fair to make a blanket statement about Subaru like that, they've taken care of many people here.

    -juice
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    juice,

    You might want to check the accessory belts to rule out an easy one. You can get to them easily by removing just a few screws. Below is a link to doing an underdrive pulley mod, but you'll see photos on the accessory belts if you scroll down a bit:

    http://www.scoobymods.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=163

    I had a squeeking belt in my Forester when cold and it turned out that the bolt holding the alternator had snapped. The alternator/PS pump belt was getting loose and caused the noise.

    Ken
  • bluesubiebluesubie Posts: 3,497
    My dealer couldn't fix squealing belts on the OB. First adjusted the tension (last spring) and then replaced the belts (last summer). By late fall they were squealing again.

    -Dennis
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Thanks, I'll read those instructions and then check the tension on the belts once I get the feeling back in my numb, cold hands.

    -juice
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    comes from owning Fords, switching to Subies, and thinking something has got to go wrong sometime?
  • celica115celica115 Posts: 169
    SOA is willing to listening to my case every time I call. They do follow up the problem of their cars. Even there is problem sometime, I still love my Subie. Where else can you find such good handling = $$$ production car in US? Only Subaru!

    Luk
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,732
    The manual calls for a lighter low temp pour weight (5w vs. 10w) based on the idea that thicker oils will not circulate fast enough to protect during startup. But you guys are suggesting that the thicker oil will protect better once it is circulating by virtue of it filling the gaps in cold metal moving parts better than the thinner oil.

    So it comes down to determining when the most wear damage occurs. If it is during the first say 15 seconds (which is what I was always told), then the thinner oil gets there faster and is better. If it is during the first 5 minutes, then the thicker oil may prevent damage until expansion closes the tolerances.

    Does that sum it up?

    Steve
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    actually what I'm saying is that synthetic 5w30 flows so well cold that it drains down and little of it remains on the top half of the cylinder head, leading to excessive cold start valvetrain noise.

    the most wear, unquestionably, is the first few seconds an engine is running before oil pressure is established.

    -Colin
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,732
    is a double edged sword. First to drain down, but first to pump back up.

    Steve
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Exactly. Unfortunately, there aren't much data on which causes less damage. I'm sticking with 10W30 as I prefer quieter startups.

    BTW, since I have Colin here also, I just wanted to point out that the Phase II engine doesn't use solid lifters. I pointed out something Colin wrote a while back on another Crew topic that explains the Phase II engine very well.

    Ken
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    I Just bought 12 quartz of mobil 1 10W-30. But, I only have 1500 miles since the last change. I might wait a few weeks. I still ask, synthetic flows better than dino (as you observed this week, Steve) so how can they both be rated 5W?

    Greg
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Greg,

    Good question. Perhaps the difference has to do with flowability vs. viscosity.

    From the website:
    http://www.performanceoiltechnology.com/tenmythsaboutsyntheticlub- rication.htm


    Myth #2: Synthetics are too thin to stay in the engine.

    Untrue. In order for a lubricant to be classified in any SAE grade (10W-30, 10W-40, etc) it has to meet certain guidelines with regard to viscosity ("thickness").

    For example, it makes no difference whether it is 10W-40 petroleum or 10W-40 synthetic, at -25 degrees centigrade (-13F) and 100 degrees centigrade (212 degrees F) that oil has to maintain a standardized viscosity or it can't be rated a 10W-40.


    But the look at the flow data here (don't know what units they represent, however):

    http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-overview.html

    The synthetics always have higher pour values than regular.

    Can anyone else shed light on this question?

    Ken
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    Ken-- were you just mentioning that bit about lifters or did someone talk about them recently and I missed it?

    But it's true... actually regardless of age, no EJ series single-overhead cam has ever had lifters. They all use a roller-tipped rocker arm that rides directly on the cam on one side, and acts directly on the valve retainer on the other side. There is one rocker arm per intake valve and one per pair of exhaust valves. (this rocker is larger, of course, and has a Y shape.)

    Perfect shot of it right here from Cobb Tuning.
    http://www.cobbtuning.com/images/sohc-engine03.jpg
    (complying with Edmunds' policy I'm not embedding that image, and the source page is here.)

    -Colin
  • idahodougidahodoug Posts: 537
    From a conversation with an engineer at Mobil a few years ago:

    Dino oil molecules are random length chains, the chains break more easily because they're simply whatever came out of the ground and survived all the processing. Synthetic oil molecules are specifically engineered as to length and size (long and uniform) and designed specifically to resist fragmenting with use. As a result, start up wear before oil pressure is established is reduced because these long chains tend to "lay" across small bearing surfaces rather than flow down to the oil pan overnight.

    So, I feel you're better protected on cold startups with synthetics. This is also why the famous Consumer's Union test of oils in a taxicab fleet showed no wear difference. They intentionally ignored the huge wear advantage of synthetics on cold startups like 99% of the public would experience. (The taxicabs were never allowed to cool down during the test - running 24/7).

    Also, with all the discussion about cold temps and starting, people keep quoting "wind chill temps". Be advised that wind chill does not act on a car sitting overnight like it does on a warm blooded human for which the wind chill index was created. If it's 15 degrees F outside all night long, your car's engine will be the same temp whether it was parked in a 100mph wind or in a flat calm.

    IdahoDoug
  • Hello everyone. I have a 2003 Forester X auto with around 6,000 miles. It seems to me that the wind noise around the front door windows seems excessive, especially for such a new model. Previously I had a 1999 Forester and I never remember noticing such a high level of wind noise. Has anyone else with a 2003 noticed this issue? Any solutions?
  • idahodougidahodoug Posts: 537
    Due to laws aimed at reducing auto parts fraud, Subaru must label any transmission that did not leave the factory attached to a car or as a complete unit a 'rebuilt'. Assuming this tranny came from Subaru's parts channels, it is virtually a new unit and was handbuilt by highly skilled Subaru trained techs. Consider it a custom handbuilt unit.

    If it was from the general parts industry, it would be a salvaged transmission that was rebuilt by someone's Uncle Bob. If you can look at your reciept and find a Subaru part number by the unit then you're OK. I cannot imagine the dealer would get a tranny from a source other than Subaru for warranty work - I doubt Subaru would even reimburse the dealer this way.

    IdahoDoug
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Colin -- Steve mentioned in another topic that the Phase II had lifters and I pointed out a post from you where you had corrected my understanding.

    IdahoDoug -- Wind chill on a car! That's kind of funny. But then again, we're always anthropromorphosizing our vehicles, aren't we?

    Ken
  • Go back to your dealer and have them inspect the seals around the window.

    My 03 X's seals were replaced and window was re-aligned after I noticed a window noise problem; I would describle the noise as a hissing. Anyway, that problem was solved.

    It's been several months since the fix and it seems odd, but there are times when the wind noise seems excessive compared to other vehicles I've owned. The hissing is gone, but the noise is more a muted blustering.

    It's not overbearing in my opinion, but it is noticeable and most likely normal for this model.
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    if the 2.5 doesn't use any lifters, can the "knocking" just be the lash when cold and no weight oil will really help (maybe just minimize)?

    Greg
  • romy4romy4 Posts: 17
    IdahoDoug,
    Thanks so much for this information. The receipt did have a Subaru Parts no. Your explanation makes a lot of sense and is along the lines of what I was hoping to hear from SOA. I feel lots better now.
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    The downside to frameless windows is that they can let in more wind noise. I find that the noise is greater when there is a cross wind -- perhaps it's the same with you?

    Ken
  • Yes, I do notice more noise in crosswinds and also more in very cold weather. Possibly the roof rack generate more noise than typical cars.
    Thanks
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    mtownson,

    Just for grins, check the orientation of your cross bars. In the past, some dealers had installed them facing the wrong way -- the wider, rounded edge should face forward (imagine the cross section of a teardrop with the big end forward).

    Ken
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,732
    Please don't beat me!!! I repent.... ;-)

    I used the terms 'solid lifters' and 'hydraulic lifters' to describe a fixed valve lash system (solid) as opposed to engines (like most American classic designs) that used a variable pumped spacer that keeps lash constant during thermal expansion.

    In another thread I said that older Sub designs used hydraulic lifter, 2.5ej phase II uses solids. What I should have said is that the newer engines dropped the hydraulic spacers and now have fixed adjusters.

    Did I get it right???

    Steve
  • This last weekend I noticed that the lens over my right-side running light had shattered. And I was wondering what internet site offered the best sales/service. Unfortunately, the parts department at the local Subaru dealership mark-up the parts and is staffed by rude and inept people. Thanks for your help,
    Eirik
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Also e-mail parts@libertysubaru.com for a price quote, they were the cheapest last time I checked.

    -juice
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