Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Subaru Crew Problems & Solutions

13738404243641

Comments

  • Plus the nice thing about a vertically mounted filter is that the oil doesn't run down the side of the engine block and then onto the rim of the oil pan. It may get oil on you but your engine stays nice and clean.

    bit
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    OCD King strikes again! ;-)

    I like to change the oil when the engine is fully warmed up so it drains more completely. To me it's worth the little extra work and time.

    -juice
  • bluesubiebluesubie Posts: 3,497
    My wife's 99 OB Ltd. has the optional engine underguard. When I first changed the oil, I removed it and I don't think it had ever been removed before. Lots of dried, caked on oil.

    I recently bought the Rhino ramps and they're great. I remove the filter the same way bit mentioned. I usually warm up the engine as well.
    Dennis
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    See Juice, if you would just switch to synthetic it would flow better cold and you wouldn't have to get burned changing it. :-p

    -Colin
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    OOPS, you got me!

    If my engine weren't as "stock" as it is, I probably would.

    -juice
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    How much did you pay for your Rhino Ramps and where did you buy them? I'm going to buy a set soon.

    Ken
  • I just bought a set at Pep Boys for something like $40. They don't usually have many in stock so you should call first.

    bit
  • bluesubiebluesubie Posts: 3,497
    They were only $29 at a Pep Boys in NJ.
    Dennis
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yeah, $29 rings a bell with me too.

    I use them ALL the time, for all 3 cars. So worth it I can't believe I managed without them.

    -juice
  • brownwjbrownwj Posts: 19
    Does anybody know if you can change oil when the 2001 outback LL Bean is not level. For example, when you put it up on a rhino ramp to raise it or if your driveway is not level in either a longitudinal or lateral direction. The manual says that the car should be level. However, on other cars, I have drained it figuring the oil drained out of the vertical cylinders into the oil pan, but I am not so sure of the horizontal Subaru cylinders. Also does anybody know if the LL Bean filter change procedure any different than the 4-cylinder?
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    good point, considering the drain plug is at the front of the oil pan.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Simple solution - my driveway is at an incline, so I drive it down onto the ramp. The car ends up level, but you have space to work underneath.

    Man, you guys are brutal! ;-)

    I'm sure the location of the drain plug and oil filter must be slightly different, and the Bean may have a higher oil capacity.

    -juice
  • stevekstevek Posts: 362
    The best thing about a vertical oil filter is that you can prime it first. I am also looking for a bigger filter on my 2001 Legacy GT, there is plenty of room for it. I had lawn mowers with bigger filter than that. :)
  • bluesubiebluesubie Posts: 3,497
    juice! Too funny. I'd even thought of only driving the left side onto the ramp so the car would tilt to the right. Thought that might be a little extreme (or dangerous) though.

    Dennis
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    to removing the oil pan and hanging it on a tree?? ;)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    No - too many squirrels!

    You need a clean room.

    -juice
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    I work in a real clean room. Semiconductors. That would work. Real OCD!

    Not to switch subjects, but, is the 2.5L interference? Sorry if this was answered before and I don't have the car yet so I can't RTFM.

    -Greg
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Think you could sneak in an oil pan? They may notice!

    I believe my Phase I DOHC is not, but I'm not sure about the Phase II. Still, I don't want to be stranded because a belt broke, so I'll change mine at 60k or 90k (scheduled replacement is only at 105k miles, with an inspection at 90k).

    -juice
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    The 00+ 2.5L with 10.0:1 compression ratio is interference.

    Why do you ask?

    -Colin
  • hutch7hutch7 Posts: 88
    After I drain the oil pan in my '97 OB I poke a hole in the bottom of the filter with a screw driver and let the oil drain into the pan , then I loosen the filter and cover it with a plastic Walmart bag to remove it... no mess!
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    Just want to know if I need to be cautious about changing the belt years from now.

    Thanks,
    -Greg
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    So, how much of a problem would it be not to drain your oil on a relatively flat surface? Do you leave a significant amount in the engine?

    Ken
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Probably 1/4 of a quart or so at ramp angles. But that's also the dirtiest part.

    -juice
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    Oh, it's really easy Greg. Simply bring the crankshaft to the timing mark and both cams will be safe. Mark the cam pulleys with white-out or something similar. They are keyed and the cams are under valvespring pressure so they won't move unless someone monkeys with them OR you don't have the crankshaft at the zero timing mark.

    Remove the automatic tensioner and one of the guide rollers and remove the belt. Install the new belt and roller.

    Now to install the tensioner, it gets a bit tricky. You need to compress the small piston that protrudes from it (causing belt tension) in a hydraulic press slowly over 3 minutes in an upright position. Anything else could cause the tensioner to fail-- you'll know because it starts oozing a viscous fluid and your belt will be loose enough to hit the plastic timing cover at cold start. Anyway, after you compress it stick a 2mm hex wrench through the hole in the piston which locks it down. Then reinstall the tensioner and after making sure all the marks are still lined up-- crankshaft and both cam pullies-- pull the hex key out, which allows the piston to raise and provide tension.

    It's sooooo much easier than DOHC. And dealers usually charge $500+ for this, you can do it by following my instructions in two hours at most. Should take <30 minutes with air tools... of course you have to remove the radiator fans, coolant overflow tank, accessory belts and brackets and timing cover but that's simple. :-D

    -Colin
  • brownwjbrownwj Posts: 19
    I think that it is important on a horizontal engine to have it level. If you have a driveway that slants down toward the street and also slants sideways, you can level the car by driving the wheel up the ramps at different height on each side. In other words, have one ramp start at the tire on the low side and have the other ramp start a foot or two away from the wheel on the other side and when you drive it up it will raise the lower side up higher so that it is level with the other side. You have to stop on the sloped portion of the ramp and put the brake on and then block the wheels to make sure it does not roll back, You then have to check the engine for long way levelness and sideways levelness and readjust the ramps and do it again until you get it level. It is a pain, but once you get it level, you can put a small paint marks on your driveway so that the next time you do it you know where to place the ramps. Of course you can always say a little sludge circulating around never hurt. It builds up and you save money because you will not have to put so much oil in the next time.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Be careful - those ramps could slip. Luckily mine angles down, but not side to side.

    -juice
  • anibalbanibalb Posts: 193
    Colin,

    What kind of air tools would you need. Do you need any special tools at all? It sounds so easy. And my dealer charges like 630 dollars for the service. I think that is outrages. Considering you have to take out the radiator you might as well replace the fluid when you do it. I don't like re-using stuff. Does anyone have a diagram for replacing timming belts? Also Colin, do you have to reset the timming on the car? Thanks.
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    You don't "need" any air tools but an air ratchet will come in very handy when you're removing the ~12-14 small bolts holding the timing cover in place. You don't actually remove the radiator, just the fans. You should loose no coolant, although according to the manual it should be replaced every 30,000 miles or so anyway.

    You do need a hydraulic press, but not a very large one. You can get 'em cheap at Harbor Freight Tools. That's a special tool for most people...

    I thought you had a WRX?

    -Colin
  • anibalbanibalb Posts: 193
    Collin,

    I have an 01 OB. I do have air tools. Unless I move back East or use my OB for long commutes then I won't see 105K for many years to come. But then again I may get a long commute again! I am sure there are tons of hydraulic presses available. But I won't need the specs now. Still too early. It is just that this stuff is all interesting to me.
  • kwelsskwelss Posts: 21
    I'm about to perform my first oil change on my 2001 Forester (I'm only at 1900 miles, but I like to halve the recommended oil changes, especially while the engine is still being broken in).

    I looked in my Forester owner's manual, and couldn't find anything about oil changes except what kinds of oil to use.

    Back around post #722, Juice posted a URL on his Web site with oil-change instructions. I tried accessing my bookmark today and it no longer works. Waaaah! Juice, did you change ISPs, per chance? Is there a new URL for your lovely oil change instructions? I'd love to have access to this information!

    thanks in advance,
    Karin in California
Sign In or Register to comment.