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Subaru Crew Problems & Solutions

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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,648
    edited October 8
    Well, I can't guarantee it for accuracy, shopdog, but this PDF lists the torquing procedure on the H6 on page 45 of the PDF (74 of the document).

    Good luck to your friend!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • jfljfl Posts: 1,356
    Wow! shopdog is right. My Haynes manual only has 4cyl torque values and my Subaru manual doesn't even address the procedure!
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,648
    edited October 8
    jfl said:

    Wow! shopdog is right. My Haynes manual only has 4cyl torque values and my Subaru manual doesn't even address the procedure!

    Yeah, I noted the same for my Haynes (and I don't have the official shop manual). The document linked above is the closest I can find. A complicated procedure, to be sure... even more so than for the EJ25.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • shopdog97shopdog97 Posts: 159
    Thank you so much, xwesx for ths info. I'll give the printout to Al tonight and I'm sure he's gonna be real happy!
  • sgloonsgloon Posts: 322
    Thanks, JFL! Your comment on wheel/tire size definitely saved me some money. Lowering the vehicle height and cost of tires was the main reason to switch, but if I'm not going to save anything on vehicle height, then tire savings would probably not be worth the cost of new wheels. Glad you knew that!

    Xwesx, yes, where I live I need definitely need all season tires as the weather can change so dramatically from day to day, especially considering I can drive up into the snow, and then leave it to come home to dry roads many times. And, the dirt roads can turn to mud here in a heartbeat. Loving this fall change of season. We already have had some of the high roads closed for a bit until they plowed them.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,648
    edited October 9
    sgloon said:

    where I live I need definitely need all season tires as the weather can change so dramatically from day to day, especially considering I can drive up into the snow, and then leave it to come home to dry roads many times. And, the dirt roads can turn to mud here in a heartbeat. Loving this fall change of season. We already have had some of the high roads closed for a bit until they plowed them.

    I completely understand that! I used to swear by good all-seasons before we bought the Forester. At that point, I gave my wife the choice of immediately replacing the stock tires with a good set or buying a set of dedicated winter tires and only using the stock tires during the "warmer six months." She chose the dedicated set, and I was able to find a set of used stock 16" Subaru rims for cheap ($200 for five, with tires, less $60 back by selling the four tires off the rims I needed for winter tires), so the total investement in the UGIs was only ~$650, mounted, at the time.

    After using them a year, I was sold on the practice. However, I live in a very starkly contrasting climate where winter means six months of consistently slick roads (although the degree of slick varies). As such, the investment is sound and I don't have to worry about wearing them down on dry roads for the majority of the winter season!

    The Nokian is a great tire. Many folks use them here (in Fairbanks and Alaska in general). Kurtamaxxguy, who lives in Portland, OR, and has a Forester XT (well, he's on his second one now!), also swears by them.

    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • sgloonsgloon Posts: 322
    Yes, Xwesx, Alaska is a whole different ball game for weather. I'm gonna price out those Nokians. I think you are the 3rd person to mention them. I've never tried them before, but good recommendations are worth their weight in gold. B)
  • kurtamaxxxguykurtamaxxxguy Posts: 1,749
    Just wondering if any knows a technique for increasing microphone sensitivity for the '14 Forester voice recognition system? Mine does an incredibly bad job of sensing voices, yet the dealer tech did not seem to have any technique for further calibrating system.
  • saedavesaedave Chicago, ILPosts: 685
    When my 2014 XT's Bluetooth was being set up, if I remember correctly, the tech set the volume for the instructions through the speaker using the controls on the steering wheel. It is possible that the microphone sensitivity might be interrelated. I'm hard of hearing so it had to be set high enough for me to hear as well as the tech.

    The dealer techs don't seem to understand this system: When later my Bluetooth connection was inexplicably lost, the tech spent over an hour to get it back!

    I think Subaru had good reason to change suppliers for the audio equipment.
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