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1970's & '80s Volvos

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Comments

  • colloquorcolloquor Posts: 482
    Hi Shifty - The long (direct) one. Here's a shot of the dash - Volvo Competition Dept. gauge cluster, and Nardi leather steering wheel. The wheel's leather needs to be re-dyed black, as it's faded over the past 3+ decades.

    image
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,201
    Nice Volvo! How many miles has your car gone and, aside from the modifications you alluded to, is the engine original?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,838
    Nice front office, very clean and functional. I was just laughing to myself though looking at the fan knob on the far right, wondering how many times it's come off in your hand.

    I really like 140s, but I hated those biodegradable knobs and the exhaust systems always falling off.

    Did you get metal timing gears in there? I"m SURE you have an IPD camshaft--the B20 needs camshaft help.

    These ARE easy cars to work on. I can't think of anything that's really hard to tackle on them. Well I guess banging out those teensy-weensy U-Joints were a hassle. Could they have made them any smaller?

    MODERATOR

  • colloquorcolloquor Posts: 482
    Not too many . . . only 86,169 original miles on this one. Yes, the engine is original, but not stock, per se. It is the original B20B, but blueprinted, and balanced. The head has had quite a bit of flow work. Instead of the original "C grind" camshaft, it uses a D cam which is still very tractable on the street. It uses HS6 SU carbs with Grose fuel metering valves, instead of the OEM Stromberg CDSE's and uses a 122S aluminum intake manifold and Volvo Competition Dept. tubular headers. Both timing gears are steel - noisier than the steel/fibre combination of the OEM set-up, but much more reliable. And, I am presently changing out the D cam for one of IPD's torque grind cams. Shifty - yes, the original Volvo cams were very soft, and it wasn't unusual for the lobes to be wiped in very few miles.

    The clutch is a heavy duty Sachs clutch and pressure plate with a lightened IPD flywheel. The engine was kept reasonably close to stock, as the 122S used the D cam, but I got rid of the troublesome Strombergs, and the combined intake/exhaust of the original design. I had tried Weber DCOE's back in the '70s, but went back to the SU's. When properly set up, a good set of SU's are fine.

    The primary improvements are in the suspension area. The suspension uses shorter, and higher spring rates, IPD coil springs, larger front sway bar, a rear sway bar, and Bilstein competition dampers. Also, a custom IPD air dam is on the front, and driving lights on the front bumper. The wheels are 15" ATS from the '70s, and the tires 185/70VR15.

    Yes, the knobs do tend to come off in your hand, especially the fan knob. Soft knobs for crash safety - right!!
  • colloquorcolloquor Posts: 482
    Here are a couple of other pieces of my Swedish Iron, although from a different origin in Sweden - sorry Volvo owners! Top: 1985 SAAB 900 8-valve, 5-speed; Bottom: 1987 SAAB 900S 16-valve, Borg-Warner 3-speed Automatic (Ugh!) - now my college-age daughter's car).

    image

    image

    I guess I'm a Swedish Iron masochist at heart! However, I do have two much newer Asian cars to revert to when needed (when I'm not under the Swede's re-working something). As usual for the average car nut, too many cars, and not enough garage space!
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,838
    Yes SUs are really good carburetors, much better than the hateful Strombergs and much more efficient and easy to live with than the Webers---which tend to over-fuel the engine and are really fussy to get right. SUs have only 3 moving parts!

    MODERATOR

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