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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    After playing with it for at least a year, I discovered the "big" pegboard base hiding under the cardboard on the bottom

    LOL - must have been interesting how you built things without that base. Of course, thanks to that experience you can probably build with the best of some of those Yoopers - just kidding! After G&P, do you remember that they came out with a complimenting Bridge and Turnpike set to go with those G&P skyscrapers? Lincoln logs, you must have been into cowboys. I was a suburban kid, so those plastic bricks were more my speed (and they had green cardboard material in the box for roofs ;). Some years back I got a copy of an old Sears Christmas Catalog - lots of neat toys in that.

  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,568

    Oh, it had a couple of little squares in the kit. I saw the big base on the cover of the box but just assumed that was an optional accessory. I made a lot of tall skinny stuff and lots of Southern "dogtrot" skyscrapers. Legos would have been more fun but never saw them as a kid, and the only other real option in my area was Erector Sets. Never saw the Bridge and Turnpike set. I'd probably graduated to slot cars by then.

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  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    I'm sure Legos are fun, but a lot of the stuff doesn't look real. The old American plastic bricks actually looked like red brick. They included white colored foundation pieces and had casement and picture windows, as well as garage doors. Only thing was, for whatever reason the roof material was only green colored. We lived in a brick ranch house back in those days that had casement windows (but they were metal so if anyone put their tongue to it in winter - oh, oh).

  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,568

    Oh sure, now I remember. Those were the ones that hurt when you stepped on them barefooted.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,722
    edited January 21

    I had a girder and panel set - bought it at a yard sale when I was maybe 11, around 1988. It was pretty cool - a large set that probably has minor collectible value now, but I played with the hell out of it, and it gave it a good life. I remember those bases too. I was very into legos, so the old set had interest for me, too. The girder and panel might have worked well with 1:43 (Corgi/Dinky or similar) toy cars, where I used lego for Matchbox layouts.

    Come to think of it, I found this at a sale over the summer, along with a bunch of HO train stuff I sold on ebay (was hoping to triple my money, was only able to double it). Kind of like girder and panel, unfortunately not very valuable, but I thought it was cool.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,722
    edited January 21

    I am at home today, Dennis the Menace on TV. Mrs. Elkins and Mr. Wilson (Gale Gordon) had a fender bender, involving a 62 Ford and 62 Mercury. What a coincidence!

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,168
    edited January 21

    Speaking of model train accessories, here's one for andre's set!

  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    So that's how Ford and Mercury merged into commonality! Actually, I think it started during the 61 model year. In the 60's, Merc's really seemed to be gussied up Ford's with a beefier standard engine and bit better suspension. A decade or so later they really just became styling tweaks apart until Mercury died. Wonder if Lincoln can really pull off a Cadillac down the road?

    @fintail said: I am at home today, Dennis the Menace on TV. Mrs. Elkins and Mr. Wilson (Gale Gordon) had a fender bender, involving a 62 Ford and 62 Mercury. What a coincidence!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,722
    edited January 22

    Yep, almost exactly when Mercury became a fancy Ford. And thanks to imcdb, here's a pic:

    Loosen up some parts, pretend crash:

    That Mercury has to be pretty rare today. There's a black 61 Mercury 4 door HT in my area that I see once in a blue moon - even rarer.

    The revitalization of Caddy took money (and time). If Ford doesn't spend, it won't get a similar result.

    @berri said: So that's how Ford and Mercury merged into commonality! Actually, I think it started during the 61 model year.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited January 22

    I always liked the rear treatment of '61 Mercurys...sort of like late '50's Lincolns. I always wished they'd have offered a "Starliner"-like fastback roof on them. When I was a kid, my mother's friend Marie had a light yellow '62 Monterey convertible I can remember riding in.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    As I recall back then, that 62 Merc rear end was a bit controversial when it came out and people tended to either like or dislike it, with little in between. Sometimes that's not a bad statement on a styling effort though.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494

    The taillights of the '62 Merc remind me of an animal "feature" that I'd best leave further unexplained. ;)

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,201
    edited January 22

    @uplanderguy said: The taillights of the '62 Merc

    Those are jet exhausts. The jet plane imagery was really prevalent in the 
    late 50s and 60s. 
        That was probably before your time?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,900

    Uplander knows from jet exhausts, from bullet-nose Studebakers in the early 50s.

    50s---jet aircraft motifs 60s -- animals 80s -- faux Europe

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,973

    @fintail said: Yep, almost exactly when Mercury became a fancy Ford. And thanks to imcdb, here's a pic:

    Wow, just up the street from Sam and Darrin's house, although in that era, I think just the garage was there, but no house.

    And yep, '61 was the year that Mercury returned to its status as tarted-up Ford. The '57-58 and '59-60 Mercurys were on their own unique body that were shared with neither Ford nor Lincoln, although the larger '58 Edsel Corsair and Citation models were based on the Mercury.

    Mercury had been moved upscale for 1957 to make room for the Edsel. However, the Edsel failed, and the larger, heavier Mercury didn't sell well either. So for 1961, with Edsel gone, Mercury moved back downscale, basically into Edsel's place...which was about their positioning from 1956 and earlier.

    IIRC, if Edsel had stayed around, what ultimately became the 1960 Comet was supposed to have been an Edsel model.

  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,628

    @andre1969 said: And yep, '61 was the year that Mercury returned to its status as tarted-up Ford. The '57-58 and '59-60 Mercurys were on their own unique body that were shared with neither Ford nor Lincoln, although the larger '58 Edsel Corsair and Citation models were based on the Mercury.

    I thought that the '59 Merc Monterey 4dr HT we had was a kind of cut-rate Lincoln because it was so ginormous and such an ill-handling pig.

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,356

    @andys120 said: I thought that the '59 Merc Monterey 4dr HT we had was a kind of cut-rate Lincoln because it was so ginormous and such an ill-handling pig.

    It wasn't ginormous compared to the Lincoln, though. The '58-'60 Lincolns were so large that in some states they had to be licensed as trucks.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,973

    @bhill2 said: It wasn't ginormous compared to the Lincoln, though. The '58-'60 Lincolns were so large that in some states they had to be licensed as trucks.

    I think that was actually the 1960 Ford. IIRC, there was something about the way those gull-wings hung out in back that made it something like 80.5" wide, and in some states, anything over 80" had to be registered as a truck. I think the states agreed to look the other way for one year, so long as Ford did something about it for 1961.

    As for the 1959 Mercury Monterrey, it was probably the biggest car in its class that year. 126" wheelbase, and IIRC around 219-220" long. Weight started at 3914 lb for a base 2-door sedan, 3985 for a base 4-door sedan. And this was a car that had a base price starting around $2800.

    That was about the same starting point as a Buick LeSabre, and a bit less than an Olds Dynamic 88, cars on a shorter 123" wb. Pontiac's Catalina was about $100 less, and on a 122" wb. The closest equivalents at Mopar would have been a DeSoto Firesweep, which started at $2904, Dodge Royal, which started at $2934, and notably less than a Chrysler Windsor, which started at $3,204. These Mopars were all on a 122" wheelbase.

    The Monterrey was sized more like the senior models in those ranges, which were around 126-126.3", the likes of the New Yorker, Fireflite, Electra, and Ninety Eight. I think the Bonneville was on a 124" wb.

    I forget how long the Lincolns of that era were. The '57 was 227" long, and the '58-60 were longer, no doubt. They also weighed in excess of 5,000 lb, and one notable difference between a Lincoln and a Mercury...the '58-60 Lincolns were unitized, versus body-on-frame for Mercury.

    The 1959 Mercury was supposedly an all-new design, although it never looked it to me. It just didn't seem that radically different from the 1957-58. Just longer.

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,168

    @berri said: As I recall back then, that 62 Merc rear end was a bit controversial when it came out and people tended to either like or dislike it, with little in between. Sometimes that's not a bad statement on a styling effort though.

    I like it. it kind of reminds me of the taillight treatment on a 1962 Imperial.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    Now that Park Lane was kind of a beast, pretty pimpin'. Merc's didn't seem to sell all that well in the Chicago burbs back then. It was GM territory, but not really too bad for Mopars either. seemed weird that there were big Ford dealers, but not a lot of Lincoln Mercury, and those around us were kind of small and old fashion looking. The Mercury of that era I didn't particularly care for was the 60.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    I like it. it kind of reminds me of the taillight treatment on a 1962 Imperial

    Some saw it as jet age like Ima mentioned, but some saw them as a pair of [non-permissible content removed]. I was kind of neutral, and still am. It did make the Merc standout from rear profiles and maybe that's what Ford was trying to do - differentiate it from all the Olds and Buicks in the parking lots without going Exnerish like over at Chrysler..

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,973

    For the most part I'm not a fan of the '61-64 Mercury, but I too like the '62. I think the rear end treatment is pretty cool, and I think the front-end is pretty handsome, in a Buick-ish sort of way.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    When I think of 60's Mercury's, I'm reminded of the breezeway rear windows although I think they only ran something like 63-66 or 67. My favorites though are the mid 60's Marauders.

  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,356

    @berri said: When I think of 60's Mercury's, I'm reminded of the breezeway rear windows although I think they only ran something like 63-66 or 67. My favorites though are the mid 60's Marauders.

    The breezeway window showed up in '57 in the Turnpike Cruiser, but I think they didn't use it again until '63.

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  • berriberri Posts: 4,189

    Yeah, forgot about those Turnpike Cruiser rocket ships. But in the mid 60's you could get the Breezeway as an option on a basic Monterey 4 dr sedan. I think as that option went on though, more buyers moved back to the basic rear window and the breezeway went into history. I don't think it looked all that good on the updated design 65/67. Speaking of breezeway, I remember back in the 50's and early 60's where homes sometimes had a breezeway between the back door and the garage and some used those jalousie (however you spell it) windows that cranked open all those small horizontal window pieces.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494

    I think they continued into '67, although were no longer reverse-slanted. I think by then the window only went down a few inches.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,722

    Saw a nice looking W126 and a pretty clean ~73-77 Celica fastback this afternoon.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,973

    This evening, coming out of DC I spotted a pristine looking 1985-88 Nissan Maxima, in a champagne/driftwood color similar to my Park Ave, but lighter. It doesn't seem that long ago that these cars were all the rage, but I can't remember the last time I've seen one. One thing that struck me was how tiny this car was, by today's standards. They didn't seem that tiny back when they were common. Small, yes, compared to the types of cars I prefer, but back in the day, there were just more small cars on the road, so they didn't seem so dwarfed by everything else on the road.

    Also spotted a first-gen Lumina sedan, paint peeled down to bare metal in places, and with some serious rust in the lower regions. Can't remember the last time I've seen one of these, either.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,722

    You need to visit western WA again, you'll get your fill of cars from that era. A co-worker drove one of that era Maxima up until just several years ago.

    Only old car spotted today was a ~65 Mustang coupe. And I've been seeing a Tempo drive down my street in the evening now and then.

    @andre1969 said: This evening, coming out of DC I spotted a pristine looking 1985-88 Nissan Maxima,

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