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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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Comments

  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    edited December 2012
    The '64 Avanti was a beautiful car.

    Do you or anyone know why the split rear window was only a one year styling exercise for the Corvette? Since most people think that window treatment enhanced the '63's styling, and made it special, one has to wonder why it was dropped.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,140
    because of the problems it caused with rear visibility. Probably also more expensive and harder to produce it.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's), 2007 Volvo S40 (when daughter lets me see it), 2000 Acura TL (formerly son's, now mine again), and new Jetta SE (son's first new car on his own dime!)

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,613
    edited December 2012
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 693
    Here's a link to a very brief summary of the split window design battle between engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov and design chief Bill Mitchell.

    Although it's not mentioned in the article Zora was quoted years later as allowing one grudging benefit to the split window design. In night driving, some headlight glare from behind was blocked by the split rear window. Then or now I can't say if the old man was serious or just tweaking the interviewer. :shades:
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,403
    The back end of an Avanti is quite interesting. I find the front end very unattractive--a regrettable styling exercise, like the wedge--the "shovel nose" school of design.

    Corvette Split Window---the story I heard/read was that Arkus-Duntov himself didn't like the split window---if this is true, he would be a pretty formidable opponent in a styling meeting for decisions about '64 models.

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I consider the split window to be a 'form over function' exercise. I didn't read the link but I know I've heard that Mitchell (who was born in Cleveland but grew up in my tiny hometown of Greenville, PA and would come back to visit) said that without the split window, "the whole car is ruined".
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,140
    a Subaru SVX. actually looked nice and clean. Certainly a rare sight these days.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's), 2007 Volvo S40 (when daughter lets me see it), 2000 Acura TL (formerly son's, now mine again), and new Jetta SE (son's first new car on his own dime!)

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,510
    "Do you or anyone know why the split rear window was only a one year styling exercise for the Corvette? Since most people think that window treatment enhanced the '63's styling, and made it special, one has to wonder why it was dropped. "

    I don't know that the buyers back then thought it more desireable. It's NOW that it's more desireable, because it's the first year, it's rarer, and it's different. Had they not changed, nobody would say much about it, I bet!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Must be fun to pull up to a drive-thru window with a Subaru SVX.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    If someone told me I had to buy a Sting Ray, I'd probably most consider a '64. I think they're the most reasonably-priced Sting Rays, I prefer the single rear window, I think the horizontal side vents fit into the styling better than the vertical vents of '65 and later (although those were functional), and I like the wheelcovers better. I also seem to remember a steel blue (or silvery blue) on '64's that was attractive to me, although I don't know if that was a carryover color from '63 or not.

    I'd still want a Fawn Beige or Honduras Maroon '62 though. ;)
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    edited December 2012
    I see a guy driving a stick shift SVX out of a large mall garage occasionally. I suspect he works in the mall. The car looks to be about in a similar condition as the one discussed here, and the same color. It appears to be a daily driver, and it sounds tired.

    I've been meaning to ask the driver a couple of questions about his car if I happened to see him walk to it, because seeing a SVX being regularly driven is such a rarity these days.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    That's a conversion because they were all auto from the factory. It is not uncommon to convert them to manuals.

    Given their price back then, the owners were eating sit downs meals, not drive thru food.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    Most were AWD, but Subaru did offer a FWD version in the U.S. for at least one model year, and probably more. Maybe these were offered with manual transmission. I'll have to research it.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,403
    My Subaru guru who runs an excellent repair shop in California says they are very tough cars to work on, and he will not have them in his shop--for what that's worth--maybe it's just his problem, dunno. I do know that parts are hard to find and quite expensive, and having driven a few, (I like the car), they aren't very fast either.

    An interesting curiosity.

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  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    I've also read that parts are scarce and expensive (those two things generally go together).
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    I checked, and you're right; they were all automatics. Now I'm even more curious about the one I occasionally see. It's either been converted to a manual, or I'm wrong about the transmission. From the sound it made backing out of the parking place and going forward it sounded like a manual to me.

    For the '94 and '95 model year FWD was offered, but they too were automatics.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Way back when, one of the major US car mags had a snow compare and it won, beating a dozen or so other cars.

    It was a GT for the snow belt.

    Nickname became Snow Vehicle Xtraordinaire.

    In FWD it made no sense.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,592
    Yesterday in traffic I spotted a very nice 65-ish Chevy II Nova wagon which appeared to be in good driver shape, as cars like this often are in Arizona where rust doesn't get 'em (and they aren't parked outdoors where the UV gets them. It was metallic light blue with chrome trim indicating top- model status (Nova?).

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Before I even finished reading your message, I pictured a light blue one in my mind. I think that was a popular color that year.

    A '65 Chevy II is probably my favorite Chevy II. Last of the original body, still quite basic inside, but a handsome revised grille and taillights IMHO, and V8 power available (actually that started with '64).
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,403
    Yes I remember the car mags liking the SVX, but that was before so many newer cars were introduced that were AWD and equally competent, with none of the fuss and bother of owning an oddball car that nobody wants to repair for you. 1980s audi quattros were also the rage back then but now you could hardly give one of those away.

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