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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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  • I've just finished appraising two Aston Martins: a DB2/4 Mark III drophead (rather rare, especially with left hand drive) and a DB6 with Vantage motor option, done in a very nice, but alas, incorrect navy-bluish color. These are not the most valuable of Astons but they ain't chump change either.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    Nice, I've always appreciated Astons. Sure some are more desirable than others, but I've generally always liked their style.
  • Unlike some exotics, these Astons look really good "in person". The DB6 is a handsome car.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,578
    spotted on my lunch break. It was white, and looked like it was in great shape. Kind of a rare sight now, and even when new, these coupes (as well as the LeSabre version) just didn't seem all that popular. By that time though, it seems like the coupe in general was pretty much past its prime.

    I think they look sharp in black, with alloy wheels. But this one just had wire spoke hubcaps.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,890
    I have the old car out today - someone else has similar ideas, as I saw a white 356 coupe. Not a common site on a chilly Monday morning, no doubt.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,023
    Now what are the odds? In our parking lot this morning was the same vintage 88 sedan. Lt Blue with wire spokes and dark tinted windows. Looks to be in great shape.

    Do you remember the LeSabre T-type coupe? There can't be many of those left.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,326
    Two doors down from our first 'starter' house, was a soft-spoken, very nice older fellow named Bob who had a very sharp late '80's-era Delta 88 coupe, that ubiquitous maroon with the aluminum wheels you'd see on Toronados of that period. It was a very nice looking car IMHO. He told me once he had owned a new '62 Olds Starfire and that he really enjoyed that.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,890
    Was out in the old car again, saw what I think was a ~70 442 convertible, top down on a mid 30s day. Also an early NSX and a copper red 70s 911. Nice to see enthusiasts taking advantage of the weather.

    Also something weird, Fairmont wagon that looked to have never been washed. Around here, that means it was covered with algae/mold, looked like it had been pulled out of a lake.
  • So, speaking of maple bacon donuts.... What is the best time of year to visit Portland?

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,890
    Depends on the weather one prefers. I would say same as Seattle, July through September. But if you don't mind a good chance of rain, anytime is fine, as conditions are rarely severe.
  • Less rain is always better... Thanks!

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,578
    Do you remember the LeSabre T-type coupe? There can't be many of those left.

    Yeah, that was a sharp looking car. I think the best looking FWD LeSabre was actually the 1986 model, which still had the old fashioned quad headlights, rather than composites. IMO those gave it a more rakish, aggressive look, while the composites actually toned it down a bit. Still, a good looking car, especially in black!

    My ex-wife's mother had a LeSabre sedan, either an '87 or '88 I think. It was a fairly good car, considering they didn't take very good care of it. I think it finally succumbed around 130-140,000 miles.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    IMO those gave it a more rakish, aggressive look, while the composites actually toned it down a bit. Still, a good looking car, especially in black!

    I remember those and they were pretty good looking in their day.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,326
    edited January 2013
    I agree on the LeSabre coupes. I liked the four headlights better, and I also like the chrome-encased taillights, before they became oversized with no chrome border, too.

    I always liked how the hoods opened on those LeSabres and Electras.

    Back to those Eighty-Eights of the same era..I can remember the older couple who lived across the street from my sister and family had the most striking light-turquoise color one (a sedan, though). I don't think I ever saw another one that color.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,578
    I think I know the color you're talking about. For about a year, there was an 88 sedan of that vintage, abandoned outside of a diner in Mechanicsburg, PA, and I remember that it was a nice turquoise color that really caught my eye.

    It actually caught my eye enough that I took a picture of it, back in 2005, which was the first year I put my LeMans in the GM show at Carlisle...

    image

    We went to that diner a few more times over the year, and at one point it had moved forward to another parking spot, abutting the curb. And, as the year progressed, the asphalt underneath it got nastier and nastier from oil, coolant, and probably every other fluid that goes into a car.

    This particular example was pretty shot, but I bet it was pretty sharp looking, when it was new.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    My wife's aunt and uncle had 2 of those, his and hers.

    The door handles really dated that car, it just seemed older than any other car on the road at the time.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,890
    edited January 2013
    Ha, funny, I remember those door handles catching my eye, too. Push button door handles on a new modern car? What? But to be fair, they are a lot more durable than the cheesy delicate lift up type.

    My grandma had a similar mid 80s Olds. She loved it - because she claimed it was easy to see out of while reversing. In 1996, her fairly immaculate low mileage car was hit by a W124 E-class that ran a stop sign - impact at passenger side wheel, total loss. She replaced it with a nearly new Taurus (at my uncle's urging) which she disliked.

    Saw 2 Porsche Targas today - an absolutely pristine chestnut brown 70s (chrome headlight rings) model, and a "well loved" looking white 80s model.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,326
    edited January 2013
    The door handles really dated that car, it just seemed older than any other car on the road at the time.

    At the time, I thought that they kept those door handles as a nod to it being a 'luxury' type car, where all the lower models of GM's had the lift-type handles.

    Andre, the turquoise I remember that Eighty-Eight being was very vivid...but then, the car was always clean and shiny. Long story short, but I remember the old guy having a red '65 Dynamic 88 convertible when I was a kid. He was the step-grandfather of a kid in our neighborhood when I was younger (remember, a town of only 8,800 people in the '60 census). The old guy got Alzheimer's but my Mom and I saw him at a dinner at the fire hall (!) and I mentioned both his Oldsmobiles I was aware of and he sprang to life, telling me about his whole long list of Oldsmobiles. He had been a pharmacist.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,326
    Between the Park Avenue and Ninety-Eight, FWD versions ('86 and later), I liked the Ninety-Eights better. I liked the 'cathedral' taillights and the big round wheel openings, front and rear. My friend who was the Studebaker dealer in our town had a champagne-colored Ninety-Eight Regency for his wife, an '86, and it was beautiful and roomy inside. It eventually succumbed to trans failure and some other stuff, and he sold it.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,000
    edited January 2013
    I always liked the C pillar and rear window design on those early Buick and Pontiac downsized big coupes. Seems to me that the later squaring off of the rear window area didn't do the cars any favor. They both had nice looking dashes IMHO as well. Now the Olds seemed to cheap out on the dash, but maybe that is because I'm not a fan of horizontal ribbon speedometers.
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