Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

1140214031405140714081605

Comments

  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    $347.66 per month

    I thought I was the only one who remembers what my car payments were on past cars!

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,119
    The payments on my first new car - a 1987 Chevrolet Caprice Classic were $237.15 a month for 36 months. I paid it off in 15 months.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    I vaguely remember my Mom's '86 Monte Carlo costing something like $272 or $282 per month. I think she financed it over 48 months. That was the first car she ever financed. All of her previous cars were paid for in cash. However, when she bought her '66 Catalina convertible, she saved up half the money waiting tables, borrowed the other half from an aunt, and then paid her back.

    I guess the 80's were a major turning point for the Baby Boomers...why scrimp and save up for it when you can finance it, and enjoy it NOW!!

    In Mom's credit though, I think GM was offering some low APR financing at the time.

    As for my old Intrepid, I don't know why that $347.66 monthly payment sticks in my mind, but it does. Heck, I can't even remember exactly what the monthly payment was supposed to be on the 2012 Ram. I know it was $358.XX, but don't remember it to the penny like I do the Intrepid.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,736
    My 1984 Cavalier was $139.15 for 36 months. My insurance was just about the same.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    My 1984 Cavalier was $139.15 for 36 months. My insurance was just about the same.

    My first car was a 1980 Malibu coupe that my Mom gave me in early 1987. My stepdad made me get insurance in my own name, and I remember the bill for that first year, liability-only, was $1,361.

    It's funny how, back then, that didn't seem like a whole lot of money, even though I was just a high school kid making $3.75 per hour, part time. It was my only real expense though, and back then we all whined when gasoline went up over $1/gal.

    Plugging into an inflation calculator, that $1,361 is the equivalent of about $2,759 today! Incidentally, I think the insurance bill for my whole fleet these days is only around $2500 per year. Adding the Ram didn't really increase it a whole lot, but I upped my liability limits, and I think that's what did it.
  • It's similar to the formula I use:

    Total purchase price + non-mainenence repairs divided by months owned.

    I figure all cars will need brakes tires etc, even shocks and front end etc if you keep it long enough so generally it averages out over cars, although class of car will matter in cost of repairs and gas used. I just keep that in mind and when looking at a replacement car will do the gas mileage thing as an aside.

    It's front end loaded too. I have gotten as low as $85/mo (late 90s Metro) and $110/mo (late 90s Grand Marquis). The gas savings tires etc with the Metro probably saved an additional $85-90 or so over the Grand Marq (that was before gas went through the roof), but hey, I'd rather drive the big Merc anyway :)

    Wait a sec - that means compared to the Merc the Metro paid for itself! :eek:
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,501
    Financing is a lot cheaper these days - dubiously low rates, and more incentives. I was looking through a newspaper from 1988 not long ago, and noticed an ad for a Chevy Celebrity *lease* - it was something around $300/month! In 1988 dollars! For a Celebrity!

    I don't remember any of my exact payments, as I always paid ahead. E55 payment (with extra) 7 years ago was about the same as my current lease.
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 693
    This loaded '88 Celebrity Eurosplat wagon demo was a 4 year closed end lease, rebate to dealer, etc. I miss the Caprice. Those third gen full size cars were very good across all the GM divisions.
    Photobucket
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,501
    4 year lease, so you're leasing an out of warranty car? Sounds risky. And a $262 lease on a used car with a $16K price? No deals like that today. I remember seeing 60 month leases in old papers, too. Weird.

    It does amuse me that a nice big comfy smooth Caprice was cheaper than a Celebrity.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    Yeah, but the Celebrity is a Eurosport ;)

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    edited March 2013
    I wonder if that $255 lease for the Caprice was some kind of loss leader? I have a feeling that might have been the base-level model, which replaced the Impala after 1985. Maybe just a V-6, crank windows, etc?

    Still, I'd take a stripper Caprice over a fully-loaded Celebrity, any day!

    Oh, on the subject of nice old B-bodies, this 1977 Bonneville Landau coupe looks kinda nice. Looks like it's been sideswiped on the passenger side, and just banged back out the best they could. Nice that it has the 403. And you hardly ever see these things with sunroofs.
  • garv214garv214 Posts: 162
    My formula, however, takes into account purchase price, and sale/salvage price, but not depreciation

    Actually, if your formula takes into account the sale/salvage price then you are including depreciation in the calculation. For example, if you purchased your Park Ave for $15K and have a sale/salvage price of $5K, your implied depreciation is $10K ($15K purchase minus $5K sales/salvage price).

    If you want to minimized the front end loading, you have to have a sliding salvage/sale price for the car (i.e. current market rate) which will show a more accurate depreciation cost on the car. For example, if you Park Ave is worth $8K this year, but only $7K next year, then your depreciation for that year is $1K.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    edited March 2013
    Yes, your way would be accurate for figuring it out year by year. That would be a helpful tool to see what years of ownership yield the lowest cost per mile. I think we could all agree that figure is most likely years 4-7 where the car may be still fairly reliable but not depreciating as fast.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited March 2013
    That is an interesting '77 Bonneville coupe. I don't remember Pontiacs (or Chevs) having the glass sunroof at that point, but I could just not be remembering correctly, for sure. I believe the glass sunroof was called an 'astroroof' on Cadillacs.

    I remember seeing a new '78 Caprice Classic Landau with the steel power sunroof, in late summer '77. This young guy who washed and detailed cars at Ron Seidle Chev-Cadillac in Clarion, PA ordered it! I remember the sticker was $9,600, astronomical at the time. He said he ordered a '77 in the spring and it came in a '78, but he was OK with that.

    It was dark blue with white half vinyl top and the door and window frames painted white, as was done on the Landau model at that time.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,501
    edited March 2013
    I never warmed up to the Celebrity, even as a kid I disliked the gauges, especially the font used for the speedometer numbers. Little details can be killer. A black Eurosport wagon is kind of sharp in a now-retro way, though. A 2 door is rare today too, I recall uplanderguy bought one new.

    I knew I had seen that Bonneville before - a "Cereal Marshmallows" car, it has its own youtube video. The seller seems pretty honest, but a lot of his cars seem to have sat outside for 25 years, with the usual cosmetic decay. That car is very clean, but yeah, something up on the passenger side, and it is kind of faded overall. I like those stock hubcaps, too, although some spokes are missing. Good luck finding those!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited March 2013
    I think you do get used to a way a certain manufacturer has instrument graphics, etc. In the '70's, I didn't like Ford's or Chrysler's speedometer numbers, and I didn't like on Chryslers how the armrests were still bolt-on instead of sculpted into the doors like GM's (at least early '70's).

    When I bought my Celebrity, I bought the couple of extra gauges, and I liked the instruments as they had very thin needles and to my mind they resembled stereo receiver instruments of the day! For a Celebrity, mine was a nice, solid dark plum color, same inside, bucket seats, aluminum wheels (before they had the big ugly dust shield in the middle of them), wide Goodyear Eagle GT tires, etc. It did corner in a 'sticky' way for the time.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    This reminds me of a 'why did they do that that way?' thread we can start.

    1) Why did Ford have the ignition on the left in the '60's, and put the radio on the left in '69 and '70 full-size cars?
    2) Why did Chevy put the heater controls on the left in '71-76 full-size cars?
    3) Why did Chrysler lugnuts turn in the opposite direction of everybody else's in the sixties?
    4) Why did '63 Studebaker Larks have an ignition on the left, and have a clock or tach in the center gauge position and the speedometer to the right?
    5) Why did VW Sciroccos and some M-B's have one center wiper?

    I'm sure we could expand this list forever! LOL
  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,330
    1) Why did Ford have the ignition on the left in the '60's, and put the radio on the left in '69 and '70 full-size cars?

    I had a '60 Falcon, and it may have been to equalize the labor. When starting the car and getting moving you had to set the choke, engage the starter, put it in gear, and release the brake. The brake was on the left, so you could start the car and release the brake with the left hand while setting the choke and put it in gear with the right. Just a guess.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    2) Why did Chevy put the heater controls on the left in '71-76 full-size cars?

    I wonder if the rationale was simply that it would keep the kids from fiddling with the HVAC controls?

    3) Why did Chrysler lugnuts turn in the opposite direction of everybody else's in the sixties?

    they only had those left-hand lugs on the driver's side of the car. I think the prevailing theory of the time was that, on the left side of the car, if the lugs were tightened counter-clockwise, then they'd be less likely to loosen up while driving, because of centrifugal force. Did anybody else ever try that, or was it just Chrysler?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,404
    edited March 2013
    I feel certain that the French must have done it at some point as well. :P

    Actually no crazier a concept than "positive earth" on British cars.

    DO electrons really care which way they flow? If they do, how did the British come to know that?

    MODERATOR

Sign In or Register to comment.