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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,023
    Uplander,

    Those are all really good examples, however, IMHO the simple biggest ergonomic flaw was in the early 80s Ford decided to put the horn on the turn signal stalk. That is bonehead, defined.

    The HVAC controls on the left is something Chrysler did in the 80s with the Omni/Charger

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • Picking a nit...........seems to me the left hand threads were on the passenger side. I remember when I was growing up it wasn't too unusual to yank on a lug wrench a time or two before realizing you were pulling in the wrong direction. Most of the tires I changed as a kid were on Pontiacs and Internationals......not sure if both had left hand threads , but at least one of them did.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    I tried to google some info on left-hand lugs, but stuff was spotty...mainly just questions on message boards and such. But, apparently, GM used left-hand lugs on their cars up through 1963. I'm not sure when Chrysler finally did away with them. Both of my Darts, the '69 and '68 had them, although when I put the 8 3/4 rear end in the '68, I think it had right-hand threads on both sides.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    edited March 2013
    Those are all really good examples, however, IMHO the simple biggest ergonomic flaw was in the early 80s Ford decided to put the horn on the turn signal stalk. That is bonehead, defined.

    How could I have forgotten that one? That was boneheaded! Similarly, but not quite as bad, is on '69 and '70 Chevy models, to blow the horn you had to push one of two little buttons on the end of the center steering wheel bar. Thankfully, someone figured out by '71 that you should be able to push anyplace on the center bar to get the horn to work! I think 'rim blow' horns were a good idea executed poorly in cars I was familiar with that had them.

    The only way I knew about Chrysler lugs was, a friend of my Mom's had a '65 full-size Dodge wagon and when she went to leave our house, it had a flat. My Dad, home not long from a day of work, went to change it for her and grumpily later complained about that 'feature'. He had only owned one Mopar, and that was a '37 Plymouth. ;)
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    I had a '60 Falcon, and it may have been to equalize the labor. When starting the car and getting moving you had to set the choke, engage the starter, put it in gear, and release the brake. The brake was on the left, so you could start the car and release the brake with the left hand while setting the choke and put it in gear with the right. Just a guess.

    I think that's an excellent guess; I had forgotten about that. My parents' last Ford product was a '62 Fairlane, six with stick and it had a manual choke. I was surprised to learn years later that a same year Studebaker Lark had an automatic choke, but Ford products (at least Falcon and Fairlane) still had manual chokes. Which reminds me...why did Ford still have two steering columns visible into the early '60's...a small and a bigger one? Now, that isn't a matter of Ford not having any money (like Studebaker or possibly Rambler some years)--just...why?

    And BTW, I'd just love to own a bone-stock '61 Ford Galaxie 500 Starliner hardtop, with the "two columns".
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    Why did '63 and '64 full-size Chevys have a "Cold" light?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I have weird little nit-picks, and Celebrity gauges were one of them. Even our Ciera seemed better. Something about the Chevy instruments just rubbed me the wrong way (and I was just a kid). I am sure your car was pretty nice looking for 1985 - my dad had a brown on brown/tan 85 S-10 Blazer - not so stylish.

    I like the instrument fonts on 60s cars, usually thin and tall, they just look cool.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I kind of miss my single wiper MBs - its one thing that catches my eye too much on the new car. The MB single wipers fly across the windshield, normal wipers move really slow. I think it was implemented to clear more of the windscreen, but was just too odd and probably complex to catch on.

    For the cold light, I swear my 66 Galaxie had something like that...or maybe I just have bad memories of it constantly stalling until it reached full operating temperature.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 17,702
    >why did Ford still have two steering columns visible into the early '60's

    I couldn't figure out what you meant by two steering columns. But the top is a rod for the gear shift or auto transmission selector. The bottom column is the actual steering column. Is that what you mean?

    >My parents' last Ford product was a '62 Fairlane, six with stick and it had a manual choke.

    The six-cylinder models had a manual choke. The V8s had an automatic choke. This was true in the 1960 Ford.

    This message has been approved.

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 13,585
    I liked the outside mount wipers on our 1995 Caravan. The ones where they met in the middle, and both moved up and out. Took some getting used to, since they looked "different" but seemed to do a better job in coverage.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's), 2007 Volvo S40 (when daughter lets me see it), 2000 Acura TL (formerly son's, now mine again), and new Jetta SE (son's first new car on his own dime!)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    Those are similar to what the fintail has, and many MB used through the mid 70s. Some call them "clap hands" wipers. I think the new style Focus uses similar wipers too.

    W116/126/R107 etc had strange wipers too - 2 hinged near the middle, different lengths. W140 had wipers reversed from the normal pattern for LHD cars.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,424
    I liked my single Scirocco wiper OK. Better than lots of dual wipers that have the right hand wiper stop right in front of me, wiping the same area twice while blocking my view.
  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,271
    For the cold light, I swear my 66 Galaxie had something like that

    You are right. I remember a '65 Custom (stripper) that my high-school friend's father had as a company car. It had a cold light, which glowed blue. It amused the heck out of us, cut I never did find out what it was for. Maybe to explain why the performance of the six cylinder engine was even more pathetic than usual.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,644
    How 'bout BMW, putting the directional signals on the right side for many years?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    My '67 Newport had a "cold" light as well, although the first time I had ever heard about them was in the early 1960's Chevies. I always thought it was a cost cutting move. Instead of giving you a real temperature gauge, instead they'd give you idiot lights. The red one, which we're all more familiar with, comes on when the engine is running too hot. But the blue one (on my Newport I think it was a fairly icy, washed-out blue) is supposed to come on when you first start the car and it's warming up, and when it goes off, the car is supposedly warm enough to start driving.

    At least, that was my take on it. In some ways, I guess it's a good idea. With a gauge, there's really no way to tell once a car is getting warm, until you see the needle start to creep. And sometimes, that can take a long time!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    edited March 2013
    This has been a fun subject I think. I've learned some stuff I hadn't known about, too. Shifty, I wasn't aware of BMW's directional signal lever being on the right hand side..but when you lived in Greenville, PA, a BMW was a very strange thing to see if at all!

    You're right imidazo, by 'two columns' I meant the second, smaller shaft for the transmission selector lever. Sloppy wording on my part.

    I knew that the early '60's Fords with a manual choke were only the sixes, and I actually had guessed that they were only the stick shifts (for some reason). But I was surprised that even six-cylinder Larks had automatic chokes at the same time, considering how poor Studebaker was supposed to be at that time.

    I'm scratching my head, but I think I'll probably come up with more oddball stuff over the years, that's not related to styling or no developmental money.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,023
    edited March 2013
    I liked the outside mount wipers on our 1995 Caravan

    We had a 96 Town and Country at work and the first time I drove it in the rain it caught me off-guard. They did work well clearing that monster windshield.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    Aaargh!!! My Dad had a 1981 Ford Thunderbird Town Landau. I HATED that turn-signal stalk horn! Theres a HUGE hub in the center of the wheel to put a horn and yet some knucklehead at Ford put it in the turn signal stalk!
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    edited March 2013
    I believe current Subarus have this feature.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited March 2013
    Kerrect.

    The temp guage went away so now you get a blue light, which turns off once engine temps reach normal levels.
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