Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

1143914401442144414451574

Comments

  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,118
    "At least the 3800 was grenade proof."

    Except for the plastic intake manifolds, which, unfortunately, were the ruination of many 3800s.
  • au1994au1994 Posts: 732
    I thought those Lancers with the 'swiss cheese' wheels were nice looking cars. Pretty clean and classy but just a little sporty as well.

    2013 335i Sport Line Alpine White over Coral Red w/Black Trim

    2005 330cic ZHP Monaco Blue over Natural Brown w/Black Trim

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    http://news.yahoo.com/5-worst-selling-cars-time-145500772.html

    "Ford Edsel" and "Studebaker Wagenaire"?

    BTW, the 940 units sold mentioned for '63-66 Wagonaire, is actually only the 1966 sales figure. For '63-66, the sales total is 19,927.

    As a friend of mine said this morning, "...not exactly statistical rounding".
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Saw one of these yesterday.

    Nissan shot themselves in the foot when the Altima came out shortly after the J30 did, with the same soft tail design. The ads aped Lexus on the dyno, but I think it cannibalized the J30 more than anything, as sales plummeted once the Altima launched.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    More "journalism" where an author isn't named. Nice.

    If they want low-selling cars, the recent Acura ZDX and later RLs beat the pants off anything they mentioned. A 60 Edsel is cooler than either.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    Looked way too much like the Altima, which IIRC was advertised as a premium smaller car as well. Also, the rear end always looked kind of odd and droopy to me.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    At least the Altima became successful. Who else even remembers the Stanza? Only us car guys would.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,424
    The '95 vintage Altima really made an impression on me at the time, especially in black with factory alloys:
    image
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I remember those wheels, too. That with the thin chrome trim which seemed very classy at the time, made the car look more expensive than it was.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I remember a friend of the family had a Stanza, maybe an 83. By the early 90s it was becoming troublesome. Don't recall when I last saw one (but I bet there's a few on the road here).
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    edited April 2013
    A 60 Edsel is cooler than either.

    I'd happily take an exact Edsel as the one shown in the (ahem), "article".

    A friend and coworker of mine, longtime Ford guy, has told me for years that the Ford dealer in his hometown of Wadsworth, OH, absolutely, positively had a new '60 Edsel convertible in his showroom. They only built 76 of them! This guy is a 'detail' guy so I believe him. He's 65 BTW. ;)

    Another dopey comment about the "Wagenaire" (sheesh)--his mentioning that only the luggage gets any sun from the sliding top. He must be completely oblivious to the third-seat option in those cars.

    They could be bought with supercharger, 4-speed, bucket seats, and disc brakes, and full instrumentation including tach in the instrument cluster (not strapped to the column or stuck on top of the dash). I know I'm biased, but not your typical Falcon or Valiant or Chevy II wagon.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    At least the Altima became successful. Who else even remembers the Stanza? Only us car guys would.

    The Stanza was pretty popular back in Nissan's heyday. I had a friend in high school who didn't have his own car, but would alternate among his parents' cars. They had a Mopar minivan, an Aries or Reliant wagon, an old abused '72 Dart sedan, and an '83 or so Datsun Stanza.

    When we went to college, he bought a new car, an '89 Escort LX coupe. They used the Stanza as a trade-in. It was really beat-up by then...smoking and wheezing.

    As for the Dart, they took the tags off of it and then the county threatened to tow it away. Initially they offered to give it to me. I was able to get it running, but then it started leaking gasoline, so they freaked out and didn't want to risk giving me anything that "dangerous", so they just let the county take it.

    My Mom and stepdad had a 1991 Stanza, which by that time was essentially a toned-down, boxier, more conservative, 4-cyl version of the Maxima. It was nothing all that great either. Transmission started to go around 90,000 miles, although they did get it to around 120,000 or so without having to replace it. It was replaced with a 1999 Altima...ugly, uncomfortable little thing, but it's proven pretty reliable. Although it did eat a transmission around 35,000 miles, I think it now has around 330-340,000 miles on it, and the car still even looks good.

    It seems like as the 1980's soldiered on though, Nissans began to fall from favor. The Camry really caught on fast, and was a much stronger seller than the old Corona that it replaced. And, as the Accord grew up and became a compact, rather than a sub-compact, it really took off as well. So the Stanza sort of became forgotten.

    The Corolla and Civic really seemed to overtake the Sentra, as well. Back in 1985, there was only one Japanese car that was in the top ten selling car nameplates, and that was the Sentra. But, the tide definitely shifted.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I also think 60 Fords are somewhat interesting style-wise, so I might be biased. 60 Edsel wagon has to be pretty rare, too.

    Are there any loaded supercharged Wagonaires in existence today? I'd have to imagine one of those would be worth a pretty penny.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,645
    edited April 2013
    not really worth that much but should be a fun toy. I think only 15 came equipped like this but this is an "option rarity", not a production rarity, so you'd have to find a buyer who appreciates that.

    Here's one for $12K

    http://bringatrailer.com/2011/11/07/paxton-power-1963-studebaker-wagonaire-dayto- - na-r2/

    I'd say a show ready version would sell for $25K, so an affordable collectible.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    edited April 2013
    That number of 15 is for real ('63's). 44 R1 Wagonaires were built for '63, too (non-supercharged). Of the combined 59, only four were painted Velvet Black, and 25 were 4-speeds. For '64, those numbers would be even less.

    That car has the grille badge put on at the factory only on cars with the complete "Super" package...and only two '63 Wagonaires were so-equipped. Of course, emblems get added over the years as we all know.

    The fender badges are a good three or four inches below where the factory put them, indicating new front fenders but that's hardly a deal-killer.

    Some smallish things that irk, although I realize it's not a big-dollar car:
    Aftermarket roof rack, wrong wheelcovers, wheels painted red instead of off-white, bumpers lack the 'winguard' wrap-around portions that all Daytona models had that year; interior door panels are aftermarket. Seat trim looks authentic from what I can see.

    As I've noted before, with a serial number, the authenticity of the car can be confirmed with a build sheet from the Studebaker National Museum, as well as original owner information if desired.

    That exact car is listed on a dealer's site for sale--"Call for Price":
    http://www.cosmopolitanmotors.com/listing/daytona-wagonaire/
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    I also think 60 Fords are somewhat interesting style-wise, so I might be biased. 60 Edsel wagon has to be pretty rare, too.

    You guys who like '60 Fords have gotten me to 'take another look' at them. I've always liked '61 Starliners, but I'm liking the '60 Starliners more now than ever. I'd take a robin's egg blue one. '60 Edsel hardtop, even better, despite the vertical taillights. ;)

    I wish they'd built a Starliner-version of the '61 Mercury. I like whatever model (upper) got the wheel-opening trim and I like the Lincoln-esque rear lights and panel, but don't care for the boxy roofline.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    Seems like a good value, which I guess is what Studebaker was about. Extremely rare relatively handsome supercharged hot rod wagon, that's not a bad mix of traits.

    I see on uplanderguy's link, the car is at a dealer local to me. Their prices are often kind of optimistic.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    edited April 2013
    The Edsel would be the ultimate Starliner-based car, for sure. The Starliners were pretty cars - even thought the roofline is kind of a copy of a forward look Mopar in my eyes, it pulls it off. And yeah, the taillights are the big problem in the 60 Edsel design.

    I know I have mentioned it, but back in the 90s, my dad had a 60 Ford Country Sedan. Red and white on red and white, 352, it was an attractive car - bystanders seemed to love it on first sight. Wish he would have kept it - but as he bought cars on a whim, he sold them that way too. Also a huge car, 60 Fords are so wide...I remember practicing parking in that car, thinking that if I could handle it, I could park anything.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    Wasn't the 1960 Ford so wide that it was technically illegal in some states? I think it came in at 81.5" or something like that, and in many areas, anything over 80" has to be registered as a truck. Or, something like that?
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,351
    I see on uplanderguy's link, the car is at a dealer local to me. Their prices are often kind of optimistic.

    I sent them an email, inquiring as to price. I also asked for the serial number, as somewhere in my house I have a printout of all 'Avanti Powered' serial nos. for '63's which list color and equipment. It'll be interesting to see if I get a response.

    I think most dealers of 'classic' cars are optimistic in their pricing!
Sign In or Register to comment.