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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,940

    In the early 60s, a higher line Ferrari was probably something like 10-15K, brand new. Jeff should have kept it, stored it in a barn, and sold it in 2014 when people love dust and patina. He'd be a fairly wealthy man for it.

  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,688

    you're close. A 250 GTO cost $18,000 new, IF Enzo would even sell you one (he had to approve the buyer). So about...what....$140K-150K in today's dollars? Harumpf. You can't buy a new Ferrari for that anymore.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,940

    Would a California cost as much as a GTO? Maybe an alloy body or something. Also price that vs average wages, and be depressed. Looks like one investment could have easily beat southern CA real estate.

    @MrShift@Edmunds said: you're close. A 250 GTO cost $18,000 new, IF Enzo would even sell you one (he had to approve the buyer). So about...what....$140K-150K in today's dollars? Harumpf. You can't buy a new Ferrari for that anymore.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,597

    To use a rough equivalent of a mere "mortal" car from that era, my Granddad bought a '61 Galaxie 500 hardtop sedan, followed by a '63 Monterrey hardtop sedan. Each one was about $3500. Decently equipped, but no air conditioning.

    I'm sure a comparable Fury or Impala would have been around the same. So, it looks like that Ferrari would have cost about the equivalent of ~5.1 of these "average" cars.

    $18,000 would have also gotten you a pretty nice house around these parts back in the early 1960's.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v502/TrafficJam28/Belair at Bowie/BelairColonial.jpg

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,940
    edited January 15

    And the house has AC!

    About that same time, my grandparents bought a 3br/2ba/2 car garage rambler on a quarter acre in a nice middle class suburban Seattle neighborhood, for 17K.

    Average nicely equipped mainstream car today is probably 25-30K. 5 of those is 150K tops - still can't get a new Ferrari for that, or a decent house in most areas.

    @andre1969 said: To use a rough equivalent of a mere "mortal" car from that era, my Granddad bought a '61 Galaxie 500 hardtop sedan, followed by a '63 Monterrey hardtop sedan. Each one was about $3500. Decently equipped, but no air conditioning.

    I'm sure a comparable Fury or Impala would have been around the same. So, it looks like that Ferrari would have cost about the equivalent of ~5.1 of these "average" cars.

    $18,000 would have also gotten you a pretty nice house around these parts back in the early 1960's.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v502/TrafficJam28/Belair at Bowie/BelairColonial.jpg

  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,403
    edited January 15

    @andre1969 said: I wonder how much that Ferrari would have cost when it was brand-new?

    I remember the "bread and butter" Ferrari 250GT 2+2 stickered for $12,000 around 1962, that would make a 250GT Spider California around 18-20grand, perhaps a little more (the cost of a 3 brm house in a nice suburb).

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,424

    @andre1969 said: To use a rough equivalent of a mere "mortal" car from that era, my Granddad bought a '61 Galaxie 500 hardtop sedan, followed by a '63 Monterrey hardtop sedan. Each one was about $3500. Decently equipped, but no air conditioning.

    $3500 in '61 seems like a lot of money to me...surprised the Galaxie cost that much.

  • kyfdx@Edmundskyfdx@Edmunds Posts: 25,951

    Me too... My mother's '67 Bonneville Coupe... loaded... was only $4400, I think.

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,274

    @texases said: $3500 in '61 seems like a lot of money to me...surprised the Galaxie cost that much.

    Keep in mind that the Galaxy hardtop sedan was pretty far up Ford's food chain. I spec'ed one out from the relevant Standard Catalog and came up with $3190 for one with the smallest V-8, Cruise-o-matic, heater (yes, it was optional), power steering and brakes, and nothing else. There are about 100 other options you might want (larger engine, radio, power seat, etc) that could easily make up the difference.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025

    Mint 86-89 Chrysler Fifth Ave, 84 Town Car, and while out taking the dog for a walk several body parts to a late 60s El Camino. They were propped up against someone's garage. I guess a project is starting.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,597

    @bhill2 said: Keep in mind that the Galaxy hardtop sedan was pretty far up Ford's food chain. I spec'ed one out from the relevant Standard Catalog and came up with $3190 for one with the smallest V-8, Cruise-o-matic, heater (yes, it was optional), power steering and brakes, and nothing else. There are about 100 other options you might want (larger engine, radio, power seat, etc) that could easily make up the difference.

    Yeah, that's just it...you start adding up enough options, and those prices jack up pretty quickly. I think my '57 DeSoto Firedome hardtop coupe had a base price of $3085. I spec'ed it out once using one of those American Standard catalogs, and by the time you threw in power steering/brakes, 3-speed automatic, heater, AM radio, whitewalls, two tone paint, etc, I got it up to around $3800. There's a '61 DeSoto 4-door hardtop that I see from time to time at local car shows that MSRP'ed for a whopping $5,000 when it was new! That's Cadillac territory! I think its base price was $3167, but you still had to add on the automatic transmission, power steering/brakes, most likely a heater as well, plus this one was pretty luxurious, with air conditioning power windows/locks, and I think a power seat as well.

  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,274

    @andre1969 said: Yeah, that's just it...you start adding up enough options, and those prices jack up pretty quickly. I think my '57 DeSoto Firedome hardtop coupe had a base price of $3085. I spec'ed it out once using one of those American Standard catalogs, and by the time you threw in power steering/brakes, 3-speed automatic, heater, AM radio, whitewalls, two tone paint, etc, I got it up to around $3800. There's a '61 DeSoto 4-door hardtop that I see from time to time at local car shows that MSRP'ed for a whopping $5,000 when it was new! That's Cadillac territory! I think its base price was $3167, but you still had to add on the automatic transmission, power steering/brakes, most likely a heater as well, plus this one was pretty luxurious, with air conditioning power windows/locks, and I think a power seat as well.

    You ain't kidding. Back in the '50s and '60s, at least for the 'low-priced three', the base price did not even include a heater and had manual steering and brakes. In some of the lower trim levels you had to pay extra for armrests and a right-side sun visor. It was kind of a game to allow them to advertise a lower price, since they sold very few cars without these options (a few with manual brakes, or even steering, but not many since these cars were awful without them.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,075

    Spotted a bluish silver Mercedes 190D at Levick and Tabor in NE Philly. The car looked to be in pretty decent shape.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,940

    Fintail 190D or 80s W201 190D?

    Today I saw a red Karmann Ghia, a pristine looking ~91 Cutlass Supreme sedan, and a very well kept looking 92-95 or so Bonneville.

    @lemko said: Spotted a bluish silver Mercedes 190D at Levick and Tabor in NE Philly. The car looked to be in pretty decent shape.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,009

    base price did not even include a heater and had manual steering and brakes. In some of the lower trim levels you had to pay extra for armrests and a right-side sun visor

    I learned to drive on a basically stripped 3 on the tree 60 Ford. But as basic was that car was, a neighbor had a 58 Chevy Delray which was pretty much as you described. Made the old Fairlane seem loaded B)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,940

    Just saw a Vanagon style VW double cab pickup - from Canuckistan, I bet.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,369

    Regarding the earlier posts about pricing in the early sixties--I think car prices didn't go up a whole lot between the early-and-mid-sixties, until around 1970 or 1971. Then, throughout the '70's, the prices jumped like mad from year-to-year. I always remember your basic two-door hardtop Impala V8 with automatic, ps, pb, whitewalls, wheelcovers, AM radio, stickered for around $3,600 for several years when I was looking at them. That started changing with the '71 model year, and it really became crazy in the mid-and-late seventies.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,597

    I think prices even came down for awhile in the early 60's, although it wouldn't last forever. In 1957, for example, a New Yorker 4-door sedan base priced at $4,173. By 1959 it was up to $4,424. Trimmed a bit to $4,409 for 1960. Then there was a noticeable cut in 1961, to $4,123. The '63 was down to $3,981. It wouldn't get back above 1957 levels until 1967, when the price hit $4208.

    To use a GM example, a '57 Sedan DeVille started at $5,256, while a '67 was $5,581. A small boost in price, but not too huge.

    And yeah, I think it was the early 70's when prices really started jacking up. My maternal grandparents' '72 Impala 4-door hardtop was about $5,000. About the only thing it had over those '57/59 Fords and '63 Mercury that my paternal Grandparents had was air conditioning. Oh, and it probably had an AM/FM radio rather than just AM.

    But then, by 1975, Mom bought a '75 LeMans coupe for $5K, and my grandparents (Dad's side) bought a Dart Swinger, also for $5,000. And both with a/c. So in just 3 short years, the money that would have gotten you a full-sized car was only good for a compact or intermediate.

    In 1980, Mom bought a new Malibu coupe, for about $7,000 out the door. It was equipped about the same as the LeMans had been, with one exception...a 229 V-6 versus a 350 V-8.

    As for that '72 Impala? It gave way to an '82 Malibu Classic Estate wagon that, if memory serves me right, cost something like $11,000. That was when my grandparents first truly discovered sticker shock. But at least it prepared them for their $16,000 LeSabre in 1985!

  • kyfdx@Edmundskyfdx@Edmunds Posts: 25,951

    '72 Lincoln Coupe (not Town) was around $8600..

    Same car in '76 about $10K

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,075

    Just saw this one last night on TV. It's the road rage scene from Marathon Man: Fintail vs. 1970 Chevrolet Impala

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