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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

19589599619639641086

Comments

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,232
    In 1949 an ohv V-8 was an achievement. In 1951 it was old news, but it is kind of interesting as historical minutiae.

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    1955 President Speedster factory white leather interior, since we were discussing Stude coupes of that general era.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/myoldpostcards/6780988854/
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    That's nice looking, more sporty (in a mid 50s sense) to me than luxury. Very modern, too - Stude not using a dogleg style wraparound windshield made the designs age well.

    Interesting that some upper-highline makes have dabbled in the diagonal pleating in recent years.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited April 2013
    In 1949 an ohv V-8 was an achievement. In 1951 it was old news,

    Two years seems to be a very short time for something to be "old news." 1951 was the first year of the Chrysler ohv V-8, Ford did not get one until 1954, By the time Packard and Chevrolet got theirs in 1955, the design must have been ancient history.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,234
    True, but a decade or more later, I am hard-pressed to think of anybody other than Stude and the Continental Mark II doing 'long hood, short deck'

    Like them or not, I think the downsized 62 Mopars like Dodge Polara and Plymouth kind of had that in their design. But I agree, that Studebaker was an early adopter of that styling trend in the 50's. Ironically, their Euro focus might have actually held their sales back a bit in those days.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,234
    I've thought of the "personal luxury car" being relatively attainable, and kind of big and heavy - 58+ T-Bird, Riviera, Toronado, Monte Carlo, etc.

    I think you make a good point about the 4 seater T-Bird bringing personal luxury to a larger sales base. Cars like the Mark II were very high priced. I'll also go with your comment that the Studebaker Hawk was more of a sporty car than luxury. I think Studebaker as lux would have been a hard sell and perhaps that's why they chased Packard.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited April 2013
    I heard people say they sounded like gargling. Funny thing is, they did.

    A case of a poorly "tuned" exhaust.

    Nowadays DI makes such a clatter that manufacturers just gave up and pipe artificial noises in to the cabin. Would be cool if a Volt made small block V8 sounds, no? :shades:
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited April 2013
    Ironically, the Studebaker coupes of that era were on a 120.5" wheelbase, 7 1/2 inches longer than a '58 Thunderbird...significantly longer in wheelbase.

    I think nobody did 'sporty with a backseat' before that era Stude coupe.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    But the typical 17 foot Ford rear overhang made it the battleship.

    That might be the pioneering segment for the Stude - sporty with a backseat. I'm having a hard time thinking of anything similar.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,232
    edited April 2013
    Does anyone really care who was the third automaker to come out with a 4-speed automatic transmission? No. Same idea.

    Historians on the other hand, love to document that sort of thing. I find it interesting sometimes to 'trace the evolutionary tree".

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Overall length for the '58 T-Bird was 205.4 inches, versus 203.9 for a Golden Hawk.

    Although truthfully, I'm not a fan of Golden Hawks, I'm not a fan of 'squarebirds' either, and I think it's mostly because those rear wheels looked so far pushed up in the body design to my eyes. But I'll agree that the car doesn't belong on a list of 100 ugliest cars.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,232
    Huge overhand is very unattractive in most cars.

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  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,096
    edited April 2013
    I had some experience with the K platform from Chrysler back then. My brother's mother in law had a loaded up early K-car sedan that they inherited and I got to drive for a week once. It looked really nice for a K-car, but it drove pretty poorly. I don't know if age had taken its toll on it by then but it felt loose on the road and none too powerful.

    A girlfriend's brother bought a brand new Daytona coupe in '86 or '87 and I got to drive that. I actually liked it, though it was not really very powerful either but at least it handled decently and felt sporty.

    My dad's last car was a Dynasty. I drove that when he was in the hospital for the last go-round. Hated it - way too soft, squirmy, and just not my kind of car. Circumstances may have colored my opinion of it.

    Finally, I almost bought a '83 (I think) LeBaron coupe new - it was the original version that looked like a tarted-up K-car. It was just that, nicer than a K-car, but still felt like a cheap car in terms of engine noise, etc., though it did have the talking nanny in the dash that told you a door was a jar, etc. :)

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Let's see... one roommate had a Dodge Shadow ES 2.2l turbo, after owning an Omni turbo. Our buddy had a Daytona, 2.5l but not the turbo.

    My boss' boss did have a Daytona with the turbo, some special edition IIRC. I remember helping him create the ad to sell it.

    My other roommate had a Dodge Raider, which was a re-badged 2 door Montero.

    I was the only Ford, surrounded by Dodges.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    edited April 2013
    Its funny we had tons of Mopar in the late 80s early 90s as well.

    Dad had an 84 Omni
    86 Shelby Charger
    87 Shadow ES Turbo

    My cousins had an 85 Shelby Charger, and an 87 Daytona

    Mom had an 85 base Charger

    Later on my Stepdad had an 83 E-class, and my stepbro had a 3.0 Spirit I think it was 92?

    My Aunt also had a 94 Shadow ES V6. That was a quick little car. I remember hers was an odd duck loaded to the gills. It wasn't often you would see a Shadow with a power seat.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    edited April 2013
    Shows how relatively popular Mopar was, especially before the Japanese makes gained their huge foothold.

    I remember my uncle had an E-class, and before that, one of those Omni/Turismo fastbacks. My dad had a Horizon 5-door, and a couple 90s era minivans. My brother had a (then old) K-car as his first car, and later a Sundance Duster V6. I remember a neighbor had a LeBaron coupe, replaced with a Caravan, and a friend of the family had an early Aries coupe. High school friend had a black Aries sedan that I want to say had odd louver kind of things over the rear door quarter window.

    My driver's ed car was an almost new Acclaim, I suspect it was a 4cyl.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited April 2013
    My best man was a Chrysler zone rep in the D.C. area in the mid-eighties. He put so many miles on cars he had two new ones on order at all times. I remember meeting him for lunch at their Pittsburgh office once when he was there, and we drove a black Lancer with what he called the 'swiss cheese' wheels (although I think there were two different versions of those wheels). I remember it was nice inside--black leather--and seemed to scoot. I liked the exterior styling too...didn't scream "K-car" to me like almost the entire rest of their line did.

    I think I've posted this before, but he said that in his opinion, AMC built better Fifth Avenues than Chrysler had! (Fifth Avenue production went to Kenosha at some point.)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Those cars were OK, it's just that they tried to stretch the K-car platform even to upscale, larger cars.

    What did they call 'em? Too square, too narrow, with buyers too old to notice?

    Funny thing was my first boss at my current job has a New Yorker or something like that, and it fit her to a T.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,234
    My dad was a Mopar man for many years with an occasional Ford here and there. His last Mopars were a Plymouth Reliant and I forget whether it was an Omni or a Horizon. After that it was all Ford or Mercury.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    edited April 2013
    Saw a 78-80 Malibu coupe today, and a gorgeous new-looking final run (94-95) W124 E300 Diesel.

    Also a hideous customized NSX - body kit, black wheels, weird roof mounted air scoop, and it sounded like a motorboat.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,227
    "At least the 3800 was grenade proof."

    Except for the plastic intake manifolds, which, unfortunately, were the ruination of many 3800s.
  • au1994au1994 Posts: 789
    I thought those Lancers with the 'swiss cheese' wheels were nice looking cars. Pretty clean and classy but just a little sporty as well.

    2013 335i Sport Line Alpine White over Coral Red w/Black Trim

    2005 330cic ZHP Monaco Blue over Natural Brown w/Black Trim

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    http://news.yahoo.com/5-worst-selling-cars-time-145500772.html

    "Ford Edsel" and "Studebaker Wagenaire"?

    BTW, the 940 units sold mentioned for '63-66 Wagonaire, is actually only the 1966 sales figure. For '63-66, the sales total is 19,927.

    As a friend of mine said this morning, "...not exactly statistical rounding".
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Saw one of these yesterday.

    Nissan shot themselves in the foot when the Altima came out shortly after the J30 did, with the same soft tail design. The ads aped Lexus on the dyno, but I think it cannibalized the J30 more than anything, as sales plummeted once the Altima launched.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    More "journalism" where an author isn't named. Nice.

    If they want low-selling cars, the recent Acura ZDX and later RLs beat the pants off anything they mentioned. A 60 Edsel is cooler than either.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    Looked way too much like the Altima, which IIRC was advertised as a premium smaller car as well. Also, the rear end always looked kind of odd and droopy to me.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    At least the Altima became successful. Who else even remembers the Stanza? Only us car guys would.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,647
    The '95 vintage Altima really made an impression on me at the time, especially in black with factory alloys:
    image
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    I remember those wheels, too. That with the thin chrome trim which seemed very classy at the time, made the car look more expensive than it was.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,949
    I remember a friend of the family had a Stanza, maybe an 83. By the early 90s it was becoming troublesome. Don't recall when I last saw one (but I bet there's a few on the road here).
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