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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

19759769789809811086

Comments

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,050
    Initially, I was going to guess that the reason you saw more '63-64 Caddies was that they built more than '61-62, as the economy kept improving, while in '65-66, even though they were even more popular, build quality started slipping, so they didn't last as long? But then, here are the production figures, which I found at the site http://www.motorera.com/cadillac/

    1961: 138,379
    1962: 160,840
    1963: 163,174
    1964: 165,909
    1965: 182,435
    1966: 196,685

    So, while 1961 was a comparatively low year, '62-64 were all pretty close, and there's not a HUGE jump between '61-62 sales and 63-64. Maybe 10% total. '65-66 looked like a healthy increase, though.

    I think the '62 Caddy is my favorite, although I like the '61 as well. I just like the clean, crisp lines and overall sleekness of them.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,050
    Nah, you got it right, that's a curb feeler! Something I'd normally associate with pimpy big-city life, but this car lived most of its life in Pennsylvania, in the rural area south of Harrisburg (it was in Middletown when I "rescued" it).

    My other '79, a 5th Ave edition, has another pimpy feature from that era...little chrome mudflaps!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited May 2013
    Did Caddy change engines from '63 to '64? I think they did. A buddy of mine whose parents had '56, '60, '65, '67, '70, '73, '76, and '78 Cadillacs had told me that the latter engine was better, but I can't recall why.

    I like the '62's also, and my friend just recently bought one from Indiana, a white Coupe deVille which I'm anxious to see (he lives about an hour northeast of me).

    When I was in college, a guy on my dorm floor (this is late '70's) had his parents' old '64 Coupe deVille (purchased new) for transportation. It was a little rusty but cleaner than the average '64 in NW PA by that time. It was a pale turquoise metallic with matching cloth and leather inside. I seem to remember it had a signal-seeking AM radio (!). We'd pile in it to go to a place we liked to eat, about fifteen miles away, every once in a while.

    Off the subject of Cadillacs, but my last paragraph reminds me that a girl in my dorm drove a '64 Studebaker Commander, dark red 4-door, which I'd see in the dorm lot. It was forlorn-looking. In an older house on Main St. in Clarion was also seen a '66 Stude back then. In the mid'70's in my hometown, there was a '64 Stude hardtop (which I later owned, another story) and a '65 Stude 4-door one street apart from each other, still being used daily.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,050
    I just looked it up, and yeah, there was an engine switch...390 CID with 325 hp in 1963, 429 CID with 340 hp for 1964.

    I'm guessing it was still the same basic engine, although both the bore and stroke are different between the two. Usually a manufacturer will change one or the other, but not both at the same time, when they enlarge an engine.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,050
    this morning I got the New Yorker fired up and drove it to the gas station. Figured I'd rather take it out during a less busy time, just in case it decided to misbehave. Impressively, it fired up on the second try this morning. Temps are a little cool, and damp, so that's just typical 70's car for you!

    Anyway, at the gas station, a nice sounding customized hotrod pulled up behind me. Couldn't tell what it was, but I'd say around a 1939-40 something-or other. It was a yellow coupe with a split grille, and lowered roof. And it had a split grille. Wasn't a GM product, as the headlights were integrated into the fenders. So I guess it could've been a Ford or Studebaker?

    Also, while I was there, a blue 1987 or older Grand Marquis sedan pulled in, looking pretty good. And, as I was leaving, an early/mid 90's Buick Century, dark blue, was entering the station. Looking a little ratty and worn, but considering what I was driving, I'm not gonna judge!

    And, this is a bit embarrassing...checking the fuel log, my NY'er was last filled up on 9/14/11. Since then, it had been driven 115.7 miles. The odometer and speedo are off, although I forget by how much, so that figure might be more like 120-125 miles. I'm sure letting the gas get that old didn't do much for it. It could just be my imagination, but on the way back home after the fill-up, it did seem to drive a LOT better. MPG on that tank was about 7.5. Ouch. But, I've gotten cars to get worse! :shades:
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,106
    Up through the 1962 model year the Cadillac V-8 was an evolution of their original OHV V-8 introduced in 1949. For the '63 model year they did a major redevelopment of that design, although it retained the 390 CID size. Then for '64 they changed the bore and stroke to bring it up to 429CID. That seems strange and I imagine that parts for the one-year only 1963 version must be tough to find now. In '68 they came out with an all-new engine of 472CID which later was increased to 500CID.

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    You should take the NYer out on the highway and give it an Italian Tune Up. In other words beat the snot out of it.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,259
    edited May 2013
    ...to make a car even worse than it originally was:

    Behold----the SHADOWMINO!

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  • berriberri Posts: 4,234
    While I readily admit to a certain fondness for the in your face 59, I share your preference for the 62 Cadillac. It has a kind of understated elegance about it.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited May 2013
    ...or to discuss price, but I just think this is the most original/authentic looking Cosworth I've seen in at least a couple decades:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Other-Cosworth-Vega-1975-Chevrolet-Cosw- - - orth-Vega-Twin-Cam-All-Original-Only-15K-Original-/271203972592?pt=US_Cars_Truck- - - s&hash=item3f250435f0&vxp=mtr

    It is identical (the black cloth interior is somewhat unusual) to the single one my hometown dealer, Dart Chevrolet-Cadillac, Greenville, PA got in and I rode in when new (didn't drive). They had it a year later and sold it to an older lady (seriously) who traded in a six-cylinder '72 Nova for it. It is now owned by an old acquaintance, who bought it probably 15 years ago at another Chevy dealer fifteen miles away.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,259
    Well really, cheap enough for an entry-level ticket into the collector car hobby.

    The Cosworth Vega will get some modest respect at local car shows, whereas the regular production Vega is more likely to be ignored. I would stop to look at one, as I haven't seen one in a couple of years.

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    This Cosworth is exceptional to my eyes, in the little details of authenticity which interest me most in an old car.

    That said, there are usually a lot more Cosworths on eBay at any given time than truly nice regular Vegas. When the latter show up on eBay, they often outbid so-so Cosworths.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,259
    A Cosworth is worth double a Vega, easy.

    Fortunately the market is not defined by the occasional loopy person who pays too much for something but it rewards the person shrewd enough to pick the right collector car to invest in.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    edited May 2013
    Seeing an early Shadow is worth pennies anyway, why not? Nothing of value really lost. Nice sense of humor. I've seen period conversions of those things, too.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,259
    A Shadow is a throw-away car, so sure, why not have fun with it? Shiftright heartily approves.

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  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,685
    I spotted a Willys Jeep All-Steel Wagon under power and in pretty fair shape, the forest green paint could have been glossier but IIRC they came that way (not very shiny) from the factory.
    "All-Steel" was part of the model name because it was a bragging point in the age when most wagons had high maintenance wooden bodies.

    Later I saw a parked Fourth gen '64-'66 T-Bird coupe that looked in nice shape. It was grayish white and had a painted roof with no landau irons or vinyl covering,

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,934
    saw a few interesting oldies. Most of which I don't remember.

    but one I do was ultra rare. and moving under it's own power, on the highway no less.

    A Citroen SM. white. was going the other way so did not get a close up look at it. This was in the boonies below Binghamton NY, so even an odder place for it to turn up.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's) and 2007 Volvo S40 (mine)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    edited May 2013
    When I see those Jeeps, I think of Terry Thomas and someone honking their "hooter" :shades:

    A few old cars out today. Saw a parked W108 250SE - oddball engine size only made for a couple years. Was going to go back and take a pic of it with the fintail, it was gone. Also saw an early 60s small Buick convertible (Special? Skylark?), red with white top, obviously restored. A 57 Chevy - flew by from a distance in traffic so I am not sure, think it was a Bel Air 2 door post, in that bronze color I think called "Sierra Gold" with a beige two tone. Very nice looking first gen Accord. Mint brand new looking 1986 Camry, older driver.

    And I guess both of these are relatively unusual cars:

    image
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,228
    edited May 2013
    "Unusual" depends a lot on geographic location. I imagine the new E-class is very unusual in, say, rural Mississippi, but in major East or West Coast metro areas, or Chicago, not so unusual.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    edited May 2013
    Oh, I meant because it is diesel. From what I anyway have seen in inventories, Bluetec cars must be well below 10% of sales.

    Normal W212s are a dime a dozen here. 4Matic might even be more common than 2WD, at least in my area.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,228
    edited May 2013
    I guess when people do the math on Bluetec vs. gasoline, most Americans conclude that over their expected period of ownership, they can't justify the incremental cost for Bluetec. I'm thinking that the market penetration of diesels will increase significantly, as Chevy, Mazda and, maybe, Nissan offer modern diesels options.

    Diesels appeal to me more than hybrids, but not more that gasoline engines, yet, for my driving.

    Speaking of diesel, I read that MB is offering a new aluminum 2.1L twin-turbo Bluetec diesel option in the GLK, and that this engine will be substituted for the 3.0 V6 Bluetec diesel in the E-Series. Horsepower and torque for the GLK250 are 200 and 369 lbs. feet, respectively. I'm sure you've known this, but perhaps for some, like me, it's new information.

    On another topic, about three weeks ago we briefly discussed that parts of Canada, including Vancouver, may be experiencing a housing bubble. I've since read articles that support this argument.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,050
    You should take the NYer out on the highway and give it an Italian Tune Up. In other words beat the snot out of it.

    Strangely, the NYer seems happier when it's driven fast and hard, with my foot into it. It just seems smoother and more responsive. It's low speeds, idling, coming to a stop, etc where it seems to get cranky.

    This might be tempting fate, but I drove it to work today. I'm going to try and drive it every day this week, and see how it acts. It didn't start up on the first try this morning, but the third. Kinda cool and drizzly this morning, and it hasn't been run since Saturday, so that's no big deal. It stalled the moment I put it into gear, but did start right back up.

    And, for an added bonus, this morning when I turned on the windshield wiper, only the driver's side worked. So, that's something else to deal with. And, I noticed a tear in the top of the back seat, right in the middle. Probably from old age/sun damage.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,228
    edited May 2013
    "...a tear in the top of the back seat."

    Whoops, there goes the NY's resale value (LOL).
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,647
    Nah, that's 'patina'... ;)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    The only modern gasoline engines that interest me are either very economical, or tuned for performance. The average middle of the road V6 doesn't thrill me with modern 4s being so good. With the 7 speed unit, the gas 6 in the E can beat 30mpg, which isn't bad anyway.

    Yes, the 4 cylinder diesel is replacing the V6. It should work well, as that engine is very popular in Europe. However, that engine has worse NVH - the 6 is very smooth and would be hard to beat. Maybe they can isolate it, and maybe the tradeoff will be worth it for even more mileage (my best cruising at an average of ~60 for 100+ miles was 45mpg). I also kind of like that the V6 Bluetec is somewhat of an industrial unit - used in Sprinters. It will be durable.

    The Canadian gvt is manipulating interest rates and related policies to keep the bubble afloat, but I fear it won't end well there. Especially for condo buyers, of which there are probably a greater percentage of in Canadian cities than in the US. The place has often seemed to follow a similar path to the US, just lagging by some years - once again seems true.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    Cleaned out my phone, a few more paired pics (this time with new tires).

    No need for a backup camera here:

    image

    Old style is more flamboyant:

    image

    Half a century:

    image
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,228
    Ah, okay, in that case the upholstery tear adds to the value.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,106
    The Canadian gvt is manipulating interest rates and related policies to keep the bubble afloat, but I fear it won't end well there. Especially for condo buyers, of which there are probably a greater percentage of in Canadian cities than in the US. The place has often seemed to follow a similar path to the US, just lagging by some years - once again seems true.

    Huh?

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,952
    Sorry?

    Just google Canadian Housing Bubble - there are many sites detailing it, some even city-specific.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,106
    Aside from being a totally random non-sequitur in this forum, to compare Canada to the US in terms of any housing bubble is at best media-fueled nonsense. There are many differences, chief among them that in Canada people do not qualify for mortgages unless they have jobs, income, and a track record of paying their bills.

    Now, back to cars.

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

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