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Nissan Quest 2004+

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  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919
    Try a search in Nissan Quest 2004+ Problems too.

    Steve, Host

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    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • mwcoxmwcox Posts: 13
    I was told, by two different dealers, that the first few hundred Nissan Quest that came off the assembly line in MS was the Nissan 'Copper' color used on the 350Z and others. I remember that the first Quest I saw at the dealer over a year ago was copper. No, this isn't the Autumn Red, it was copper. Is this true? Anyone know?
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919

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    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • famof3kidsfamof3kids Posts: 160
    I have to disagree with Karl regarding the car seat installation. If he had a newer car seat that implemented the LATCH restraints, he wouldn't have to use the seatbelt. We have one child in the LATCH car seat, on the passenger side second row captains chair. It was very easy to install and the entire system is contained on the seat. So, you can still tilt the seat, even with a child strapped in, to access the rear seats if needed. As advised in all the NHTSA materials regarding car seats, ensure that the car seat you purchase fits well in your car and that you can fasten it securely. All car seats don't fit all cars. The LATCH system greatly simplifies this task. LATCH seats in the Quest are the two second row captains seats along with the center position of the rear seat for a total of 3.
    In regards to driving, I feel that it handles very similar to the Honda. I believe they are both a drivers van and inspire a sporty driver oriented experience. They feel in contact with the road and offer nice feedback, giving the driver confidence. I didn't like the Grand Caravan and the Sienna's handling as they felt as if they weren't in contact with the road and offered little driver feedback.
  • I love the Quest. It is an awesome vehicle. I wanted to trade my 01 Grand Caravan for an SUV and I'm glad I didn't. Sure, the sliding doors rattled but I just had them fixed today and it is whisper quiet on the inside. The dash and console are very intuitive. The kids love the Skyview roof. It also has the best V6 in the world under the hood. Everybody is resistant to change. Nissan needs to do a better job at getting the word out and getting people to at least step inside a Quest. I believe it is the best minivan on the market by far. Let's hear from other proud owners.
  • octaneoctane Posts: 1
    Couldn't agree with you more!!! I've had my SE for five months and had the rattles fixed too. No biggie, at least it wasn't my tranny like my 2002 at Ody 23,000 miles. I drove the Sienna, Caravan, Venture, MPV, Freestar and none drove as exciting and steady as the Quest. I was once blinded and forgiving to flaws based on in-demand cars to be "in." No more, I review a car on its merit. I still don't see what others find in the Sienna, IT'S UGLY and PLAIN!!! The Quest is a hidden treasure and I'm glad I didn't pay attention to the negative posts. Cheap Plastic, hard to read odometer? Not in my Quest!!!
  • Excellent. I drove the Odyssey and the Sienna and they could not convince me to trade my Caravan in for either of them. I already had a boring, typical minivan. The Quest is solid and fun to drive and abundantly smarter and sexier looking than any other minivan. Check all the specs before you buy and then take them all out for a drive. If you're going to pay 40K+ (CDN) for a less-than comparably equipped Caravan or a Freestar without even looking at the Quest then you need to check yourself into the nearest institution.

    Cheers.
  • gg2k2segg2k2se Posts: 109
    Our SE was purchased in December and we do enjoy driving it on long and short trips. We frequenlty pack it up with 2 adults, 3 kids, small dog, 5 bikes and lots of stuff for visiting in-laws. The Quest is comfortable, roomy and responsive. As an engineer, I hate to say I "love" the vehicle and I am quite surprised that the Edmunds long-term test continues to have an editor, Karl, say he "hates" the gauges as a major reson for disliking the overall van. The gauges are slightly different but should take no more than 2 minutes to adjust to IF YOU TRY.

    I just took my van in for the "customer satisfaction" fixes and hope to have the rattles fixed, which were my biggest concerns.

    Yes, the "differnet factor" was important. It's an attractive vehicle if you like contemporary style.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919
    Last I checked, Karl owned an Odyssey. Maybe he's biased. :-)

    Apparently Karl has hated center consoles for years so I doubt we're going to change his mind, but you're welcome to try:

    Letters to the Editors

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • golden_sgolden_s Posts: 19
    The Quest was rated as having the best rollover rating among 2004 minivans!

    http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/nhtsa/announce/press/pressdisplay.cfm?ye- ar=2004&filename=pr34-04.html
  • ciracira Posts: 32
    We have a 2004 Quest SE with about 11,000 miles on it. We would like to buy an extended warranty. Does anyone know of the best dealer to buy one from in terms of price? I shopped dealers for an extended warranty on a Mercedes two years ago and found a dealer in CA that was selling factory warranties at 2/3 the list price. Anyone know of any Nissan dealers who like to make their customers happy in this way?
  • Does anyone know where the fuse block is located on the Quest???
  • chlopchlop Posts: 1
    Does anyone know if you can add the in-cabin micro filter? Is it just a matter of buying a filter and installing it?
  • famof3kidsfamof3kids Posts: 160
    Anyone know where this subwoofer is located? Sounds like the passenger rear side of the van, but, not sure.
  • Can you get roof rack crossbars installed on an SL? Can you get them from the dealer or aftermarket? I'd prefer to get them from the dealer if so, anyone know how much?

    NQC
  • questilquestil Posts: 5
    You can get cross bars on SL. Dealer asked for $450 but ready to sell for $250. On SE this is standard.
  • sopecreeksopecreek Posts: 203
    Does the rear power liftgate door both power open and close, or just power open and manual close? Is the control on remote key fob?
    Thanks.
  • park3850park3850 Posts: 10
    Both opens and closes. The control is on the remote key fob as well as the cabin control panel.
  • hmomexhmomex Posts: 15
    Any date on the 2005 Quest release?
  • sstrz1sstrz1 Posts: 28
    Yes you can.... run a search on google "Nissan Quest crossbars"... you'll find a web sight for $127, genuine Nissan parts.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919
    Nissan design chief says Quest minivan styling went too far (AutoWeek)

    Looks like some in here were quoted....

    Steve, Host

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    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • famof3kidsfamof3kids Posts: 160
    2004 Quest SE
    We love the exterior styling of our Quest. I don't think the styling has gone too far as we enjoy 'not' driving a jelly bean car. So many of the vans just blend in and are so anonymous. If I had to drive a van, and I do with three kids, I wanted a vehicle that stood out from the crowd, got noticed, and represented something different. All our friends, that drive other vans/suvs, love and envy our van. The three comments we hear over and over from them are, I love the way it looks, its really powerful and handles like a car, and, it sure is quite.
    I think there are several issues that are preventing customers from looking to Nissan for a van.
    1) Advertising - I don't think that Nissan did enough to tell the world that they now make a full size, one of, if not the largest, stylish van. They didn't convey the 'I want it and have to have it' mentality to the family genre. They seemed to chase after Carrie Bradshaw, Samantha Jones, Charlotte York, and Miranda Hobbes of Sex and the City (HBO). The 'real' moms know that there is much more to a van than sophisticated sheek, which was heavily advertised. It is about functionality, usability, utility, all of which this van has, but, isn't conveyed to the potential customer. Read the articles and you'll soon realized that even many automotive journalist don't realized the the second row seats in a Quest fold flat. Most articles give credit to the DaimlerChrysler vehicles as the only vans with fold flat second row seats. What about the fact that the Quest has rear vented disc brakes. I don't think any other van has that, but, have you seen it marketed anywhere?
    2) Inventory - Most dealers have fewer than 10 vans on their lot. A large dealer in our area currently has 6 of the same color on the lot. Why not try to ensure that most dealers have at least a choice of colors and models. Look at the DaimlerChrysler lots, they are full of vans.
    3) Interior - Many of the interior colors are way too light for family use. Family's look at the carpet and seats and image that spilled chocolate ice cream and how easy it will clean up. You don't put light great carpet at the front door of your home, so, why would you want it in your vehicle especially if you have children. The center console, wow, what a controversy here. I think it could be improved with larger buttons. With larger buttons and larger text on the buttons, you could find the appropriate button quickly while driving. Also, the OD off button needs to be removed from the shifter. Maybe place that on the dash, afterall, how many people really use that on a regular basis. The angle of the console is one in which a woman with long fingernails would respect. You push all the buttons with the pad of your finger, not the tip of your finger. We have never really figured out the need for the joystick control, it is seldom used except during initial setup/preference changes.
    4) Dealer training - Nothing bugs me more than a salesman that doesn't know what he is selling. I am an automotive enthusiast, and know my stuff when it comes to cars and I don't even work in the automotive industry. I enjoy quizzing the salesmen/dealerships, and am always amazed at the lack of knowledge many of these folks have. If this is your primary job, shouldn't you be required to know your products inside and out? If you knew this information, wouldn't it be easier to sell the vehicle?
  • badgerfanbadgerfan Posts: 1,565
    Hey Steve,

    Autoweek quoted my post in the number 1274 in the Chevrolet Uplander/Pontiac Montana SV6/Saturn Relay/Buick Terraza discussion!

    Do I get any prize, reward, or just 15 seconds of anonymous fame? :)
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919
    Kewl, that was your goofy quote!

    :-)

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • badgerfanbadgerfan Posts: 1,565
    I guess that 15 seconds of anonymous fame is all I get.........oh well, such is life.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,919
    Next time you're in Boise I'll buy you a latte!

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • badgerfanbadgerfan Posts: 1,565
    Make that a straight black coffee and maybe I'll take you up some day, though I don't know when I will get to Boise. I ingest too many calories as it is, so thanks, but no latte.
  • eyeblindeyeblind Posts: 156
    I agree with Famof3kids. I don't think they went too far with the exterior or interior styling. My wife and I have two kids and weren't even willing to consider a mini van until we saw the Quest. The style was the #1 reason we bought it. I guess, in that respect, Nissan's advertising succeeded and has succeeded in attracting some consumers, like us, who might not normally consider a mini van. Once we had the van I was blown away with the functionality and utility of a mini van. The functionality and utility of mini vans is why most people buy mini vans. In their advertising these things are either in small print or a fleeting image in a commercial. Lets just look at some of their advertising campaigns.

    " Moms have changed. Shouldn't the minivan." Mom's haven't changed that much, have they? One thing is for sure, what mom's need out of a mini van hasn't changed. The Quest makes the things mom ( and dad ) need from a mini van far easier than ever before. This fact is over shadowed by the emphasis on styling.

    " The Quest doesn't forget that mom and dad are lovers" I'm not kidding. This was an add in the car magazines. I saw it in Car and Driver. I guess this was suppose to appeal to us one track mind men. My wife and I have figured out what we can do in the back of the Quest with kids at my parents and the third and second row folded flat with out an add trying to tell me. Besides, that is not why people buy mini vans. I was, however, amazed by how much a could fit in the fan with all the seats folded flat and that I didn't have to remove any of them.

    There was another one trying to sell sex between mom and dad. It was a t. v. commercial with a Quest sitting on the beach on a moon lit night. Mom and dad romantically sitting on the beach. I don't remember the slogan.

    "Passion Built It. Passion Will Fill it Up." I did like that add.

    We subscribe to Parenting magazine. The Quest was release July 2003. The very first Quest add showed up in May 2004 11 months later. I'd think a magazine like that would be one of the first places they'd advertise. In that 11 months Toyota, Honda, Kia, Chrysler, Ford have all placed ads. They are now emphasizing style and safety. Perhaps this is a sign of a shift in advertizing. One say's " Safety first. With style one millisecond behind." The other is " Safety and Beauty. Finally, a minivan both sides of your brain can agree on."

    Minvan buyers have traditionally sacrificed style for functionality. It is obvious that the Quest is uniquly styled. EMPHASIZE the functional aspects of the van and perhaps consumers might come around. I think Nissan should be patient.
  • golden_sgolden_s Posts: 19
    I agree with famo3kids and eyeblind. I have 4 kids, the reason we got the Quest (S) is that it is the only minivan with side curtain airbags on all three rows, 4 wheel ventilated disc brakes, traction control, 4 wheel independent suspension....(you get my drift) as standard equipment. And the versatility of the interior, you just can't imagine until you really need to use it. We moved out of our house without renting a huge truck or hiring movers. We were able to fit in a queen size sofa bed in there with lots of room to spare. Not having to remove any seats really made the difference, it was so easy to shift from cargo hauler to family van. By the way that storage bin in front of the steering wheel is where I keep my gas receipts until I file them, how convenient. And that card holder on the steering column, since I don't have navigation is where I put my printout from mapquest, small things that make a difference.

    I just noticed lately seeing more Quests on the road here in Jersey City, NJ, in fact a couple of I've recalled being either behind or in front of one in a stoplight.

    Long time ago I mentioned in my post that Nissan didn't seem to be doing a good job on advertising the Quest, I think it has proven to be true. They should use quotes from car magazines too, my favorite is from Car and Driver which goes something like this "The Quest manages to be a rarity in the minivan realm-it stirs up emotion".
    You will feel that the moment you take your first drive.
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