Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Auto collectibles and paraphernalia...

17891012

Comments

  • steverstever Ex Yooper, en route to New MexicoPosts: 40,500
    Someone is dumping a big lot of them in the UP on craigslist. No idea if any are pre war or otherwise collectible.

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    Looks mostly postwar, some 1930s material. Always be leery when a seller proudly claims to be using material from a 2004 collectors guide - they probably aren't connected to market realities.
  • steverstever Ex Yooper, en route to New MexicoPosts: 40,500
    I figured the $7,000 book value was way pie in the sky. Otherwise, they'd eBay them.

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    edited September 2012
    Ebay is generally the best place to determine collectibles values (via sold listings - not wacky "buy it now" dreamers). I suspect it is a collection worth a maybe half that price there, at most.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,201
    From AutoWeek...

    By: Jake Lingeman on 10/23/2012

    "If you’ve ever wanted to get your hands on a World War II-era Daimler-Benz DB10 12-ton Prime mover, the Auctions America event on Dec. 8 may be your only chance.

    The auction house is concluding its 2012 season by helping the National Military History Center in Auburn, Ind., sell more than 80 vintage military vehicles and more than 100 pieces of war memorabilia.

    'This is truly an exceptional opportunity for collectors of both vehicles and military hardware to acquire many one-of-a-kind lots and prototypes,' says Donnie Gould, Auctions America president. 'The museum items are not relics; they tell not only the American story in both war and peace, but also the histories of Germany, France and Britain.'

    The DB10 is a half-track, meaning it has regular wheels in front to steer and tank treads in back for torque and grip. This particular vehicle currently has no engine but specifications call for a Maybach V12 gasoline engine. It doesn’t come equipped with any arms either, but could be fitted with a 7.92-mm MG34 or MG42 machine guns when the zombies come calling. The 12-ton half-tracks started production in 1935 and kept rolling until 1945. Their main purpose was to move a large variety of artillery in service with the German army.

    A 1943 Chevrolet C60L CMP 4x4 General Service truck will also cross the block in Indiana. It has a 216-cubic-inch I6 making 85 hp. It has a four-speed transmission with one reverse gear. The C60Ls and similar models built by Ford accounted almost a quarter of the trucks built in Canada during WWII. This is a three-ton model that features a cab with a reverse slope windshield and embedded headlights. Several body types were produced including ambulance, gas and water tanker, dental clinic and general cargo, as displayed.

    In addition to the heavy machinery, the auction will also offer a selection of motorcycles, including this 1937 Victoria KR9. The German army-gray cycle has a 15-hp, two-cylinder gasoline engine mated to a four-speed, hand-change gearbox. Top speed is about 65 mph. These bikes weren’t purpose-built military vehicles. Most were purchased for service from civilian stocks. It’s mainly for paved-road use, the lack of rear suspension and suspiciously low ground clearance make it more a transport bike than a warzone tool.

    Tickets to the one-day auction are available for $10 per person for the preview day on Friday, Dec. 7, and auction day on Saturday, Dec. 8, which will allow visitors to access the museum. All the proceeds from admissions for both days will go directly to the National Military History Center, which is currently looking for funds to shore up its finances and create more room to better display military items."
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    I bought a copy of this DVD at the MB Museum. - yes, a fintail documentary. I had a copy of this back in the 90s made from PAL to NTSC VHS, but lost it. I now have a region free DVD player, can't wait to watch it again.

    Also found a fintail book at Sinsheim, and bought 9 boxed HO scale toy cars from about 20 years ago, at a flea market in Austria for EUR 2 each.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    My European finds - nothing too hot. Found an assortment of vintage Matchbox at a flea market in Liechtenstein, but the crazy seller wanted CHF 75 apiece for them, or roughly double ebay prices. No sale.

    Went to a flea market in Austria and bought these HO cars for EUR 2 apiece, all are early 90s vintage, tractor a little newer:

    image

    And the cool fintail DVD and book, nice souvenirs:

    image
  • berriberri Posts: 4,188
    I just saw the Chrysler Museum in Auburn Hills, MI is closing at the end of the year. A lot of automobile museums seem to be shutting. I guess it's the economy and the rising costs of operations and insurance these days. Very Sad!
  • steverstever Ex Yooper, en route to New MexicoPosts: 40,500
    Looks like Chrysler is going take it over but just open it for special occasions. (press release)

    Roadside attraction kind of stuff is suffering all over. Lots of competition for entertainment dollars.

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • berriberri Posts: 4,188
    Yeah, I think you're right. At least Arizona still preserves an original section of the old Route 66. If people that can remember those traveling days, they probably best take a drive on it before it vanishes too.
  • steverstever Ex Yooper, en route to New MexicoPosts: 40,500
    edited November 2012
    I need to dedicate some extra time when I'm over by the Alberta Village Museum and Ford Historic Sawmill. Driven by it a half dozen times now. Gotta be more entertaining that the Giant Nickel or largest fiberglass bass/walleye/goose statute.

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    The museums probably just need to be maker-owned and then managed better.

    The big German name museums are huge tourist draws.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,188
    Hadn't heard of that place. The original Henry Ford was certainly a man of some unique ideology and contrasts. Sometimes I wonder if he and the Deuce were similar in anything???
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    a '62 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk motorized model. I've never seen one.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/181055520036?_trksid=p5197.c0.m619

    I'd have to paint that yellow interior. ;)

    I always wished Danbury or Fairfield Mint would do a Gran Turismo Hawk. Like the real car, you'd think they'd be halfway there for tooling since there's a beautiful '57 Golden Hawk 1/24 scale model out there.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,832
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    I've never seen one of those. Odd, very Japanese, reminds me of a period Bandai creation, but I don't think they made kits at the time.

    Looks like the same company made a few other American cars

    Speaking of Bandai, they made a nice Avanti:

    image
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I think there's a guy in the S.D.C. who either makes those GT Hawk metal models by hand or imports them from somewhere. They're astronomically expensive. I do like the Rose Mist one in your pic.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    That Avanti looks pretty nice for the scale...except for that light blue with red interior. ;)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,832
    I like the blue and red combo. I've even seen sedans painted that way, with blue on the bottom and a dark red top and, while unconventional, actually works on the right car.

    MODERATOR

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Thanks for posting all this, especially the German-made '53 which I (ahem) see is still for sale at that asking price! ;)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,832
    you could buy a REAL one for that price!

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=602887

    MODERATOR

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    Most ebay "buy it now" prices for vintage items tend to be expressions of first amendment rights :shades:
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited January 2013
    Sad about the Chrysler Museum. The College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend has closed and is moving, which is a real shame. Luckily, the Studebaker National Museum is still doing well per their quarterly updates I get as a member...although, they still sure ask me for money regularly! ;)

    I've got to believe the archives helps them out a good bit...build sheets, and blueprints also, even for many Packards pre-merger.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    I finally got a decent copy of Dinky 186, this one with apparently rare (for the model) white tires:

    image

    I like this model, as it is a good match for my car:

    image
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Geez, you couldn't get any closer! Good for you! I was always delighted with the Matchbox Wagonaire. If I had something as close to one of my actual Studebakers, though, I'd be giddy!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    edited April 2013
    It seems Dinky used my color as their basis. I am not complaining - it's cool to have with the car.

    I've never seen a toy of a later Lark/Daytona, but I once had one of these HO scale Larks - this company also made Hawks and Avantis, IIRC:

    image

    The British had a fascination with the Wagonaire, here's a Corgi/Husky variant - this one was made in a few different paint schemes, this one as a TV camera car:

    image

    Dinky made several Studebaker models, and both firms had Hawks. It might make sense as some the Stude lineup had what one can argue kind of a European feel to it.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited April 2013
    Thanks for posting; I had not seen those early Larks before. I do own a yellow Corgi Wagonaire camera car just as you pictured. Matchbox actually got the location of the front fender emblem more-correctly than Corgi. UPI bought a fleet of Wagonaires for camera cars and there are pics on the internet that look like they could have been the inspiration for the Corgi toy.

    I have an "Eko" HO-scale Gran Turismo Hawk, made in Spain. It looks like this one but is red (although it does have the silver decklid overlay so must be a '62 or '63):

    http://studebakertoys.homestead.com/files/ekohwkwh.jpg

    I so wish that Fairfield or Danbury Mint would do a GT Hawk. They've done just wonderful Golden Hawks and Packard Hawks--they'd be halfways there.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,573
    Re: those Wagonaire camera cars - they must have beefed up the rear suspension, imagine the weight of all that stuff+cameraman!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,704
    The Matchbox is a finer casting IMO. Also not terribly rare, a must-have if you own the real thing.

    I am surprised Brooklin Models hasn't made a GT Hawk either. They've made a few Studes, including an early Lark. They aren't as precise as some models, but they have their charm, and are well made.
Sign In or Register to comment.