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Auto collectibles and paraphernalia...

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Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    These are meant more as old toys than scale models, sentimental objects. Still...I have a hard time at the $100 level, not to mention 10 or 50 times that.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,416
    I prefer to collect things that are well-made, so that even a rookie who has no knowledge would recognize it as worth keeping and protecting...for instance, just about everybody would recognize that a beautifully made ship model is not something you'd accidentally throw out.

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,012
    The next generations won't have the nostalgia

    I've read quite a few stories about boomers bemoaning the fact that their kids have no interest in their pencil collection or their cigar band collection. And no museum wants that stuff either. Maybe Ripley's.

    Old toys probably will do okay though since they are just fun to look at, unlike, say, old lottery tickets.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    That's true, the charm of old toys will help. But there will be a peak for boomer era stuff then decline or at best stagnantion, as has happened with many 30s era toys. Right now some 80s toys are on the way up, being the last decade before collectors started hoarding new in box items.

    I think things like cigar bands and carnival glass and the like have been on the way down for some time - the generations who collected those have been dying off for decades. Toys should perform better than mass produced glassware. Things like hummels and mass market art pottery are also way off.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    For a lot of collectors though, it depends on who made it and where. If I am a great model builder but unknown, I'll have a small market. Labels add a lot.

    Most common late 50s/early 60s British diecast averages between $50-100 apiece. Not a fortune, but not a pittance...and I think some of the value is in the quality, for the time these were remarkably well done castings.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,012
    Sometimes I think the best way to handle this stuff is to buy something you like, live with it for a year and take some photos. Then sell it and buy something else.

    When it's time to downsize you'll have a nice set of jpgs to jog your memory of some of the fun things that you enjoyed without having to park a dumpster in front of your house for a week to unload all the junk. I'm really, really going to try to do that on my next move. :)

    At least Matchbox toys are small.

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  • lemmerlemmer Posts: 2,676
    Sometimes I think the best way to handle this stuff is to buy something you like, live with it for a year and take some photos. Then sell it and buy something else.


    That is what I do with my real cars.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    The only good thing about moving - the purge. Even better if you can end up in the black with your purchases.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    Recently bought another car, one I had wanted for some time - Matchbox version of the 1960 Pontiac convertible, I guess this is supposed to be a Bonneville. This model was introduced early in 1962, and this purple version is among the first made, this color existing for only a short time. This is a sought-after model, mint boxed purple ones usually bring $150-250 on ebay, sometimes a bit more (I paid a bit less, but not a yard sale price). One with grey wheels would be worth maybe $6-800. It's a pretty little car.

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,012
    "Prices range from around $85 for a small garage to $2,200 for a large and elaborate diorama"

    A special scale-model home for a special car (Detroit News)

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    Ebay auction to watch...should easily hit 4 figures.

    And I took a few pics of the Japanese made lemkomobile I found last year. It's a nice little model:

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  • texasestexases Posts: 5,511
    Or, for $150, you can buy an empty box!?!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    I've seen empty boxes bring over $100 numerous times. Often an empty box will bring as much as a box and model. Supply and demand - lots of loose mint cars out there, lots of collectors who want boxes for those cars, few empty boxes. It's a weird market, and doesn't seem to have been killed by the recent economy.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    Wow, it's over $1000 now. :surprise:

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,120
    Nice model and the box art is nice too! I imagine this model is scarce.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Nice little car! I always thought the square headlights made those '75 and '76 Caddys much sharper than the '73 and '74 models. The Chevy dealer in my hometown also sold Caddy, but they were few and far between. I used to pick up the smaller brochures for Caddy there, and if feeling sneaky, I'd reach into the one salesman's office where the big 'prestige' catalogs, with the tissue paper inside the front cover, were kept!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    I've seen some experts speculate it could bring 3-4K or maybe more. Crazy.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,509
    It's not easy to find in that color, but shouldn't be more than $50 for a mint one.

    The key on my example is those whitewall tires, which are not standard issue. Apparently they are a custom feature or some kind of unknown special edition.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,416
    The Supply and Demand equation at work---bingo!

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