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Auto collectibles and paraphernalia...

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  • blh7068blh7068 Posts: 376
    pretty much pertain to my 71 firebird or Pontiac of that year. One thing I do have that is not seen often is a 71 pontiac dealer manual, the one given to the sales folks so they can learn all about the pontiac lineup. its in good shape an is still in the original binder. dont know if its worth anything though. Thumbing through the acessories section I learned that you could order a cassette player in the firebird for 71, which to me was interesting since 8 tracks were "in".
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,871
    You "need" some cherry bombs?

    Mad at someone, perhaps?

    Brings back memories..when I was a kid, if we got lucky we might get ahold of some cherry bombs. For those who don't know, these were about 2/3rds the size of a golf ball, red in color, with a short green fuse. About three times as loud (and destructive) as a large firecracker.

    I think the M-80's have replaced these now.

    But the LOUDEST and most dangerous of all, was a Seal Control bomb! These were sold to commercial fishermen who would light them and throw them over the side of their fishing boats. They would go off underwater and scare seals away from their nets. They were about 1/2 the size of a toilet paper core, yellow and black, with a large fuse that came out the side. There was a warning lable on them..." Do not discharge above water"

    Yeah...right!

    Since I grew up in a fishing town, it seemed these would turn up once in awhile. They were EXTREMLY LOUD and very scary!

    Then there was the night we threw one into an alley in back of a Chinese restaurant....

    Ah...youth!
  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    Yeah I remember the Seal control bombs too. I was down at Pierpoint landing one time...I'm sure you know where that is! We used to go down there and get a "mile long hotdog" [actually about a 10 inch hotdog, with EVERYTHING on it.]
    I went down there usually in my buddy's Dad's 55 Ford Ranch Wagon-the strippo one, with rubber around the windshield and no chrome except for the grill and taillights. It was that beige color, with white door and window frames. A popular color for Fords that year.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,701
    1960s engine badges. I've been trying get together a collection of these and I've managed to cage a few from auto swap meets but I'd really like to find a supplier of NOS reproductions. I'd really like to get badges for 327 and 409 Chevies, any Ford badge with the black thunderbird, particularly 406 and 427 and of course any of the big MoPar Hemis Failing that there's a line of miniatures of these that are tie-pins and I'd like to get more of them. I hasven't been able to get more since the place I got them went out of business. Does anyone have any ideas?

    And I'd love to find a good source of racing Decals, particularly F1 and GT racing.

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,871
    We grew up not far from each other in the same period of time. It's probably a good thing we didn't get together! :)

    Yeah...Pierpoint Landing..the Pike...long gone.
  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    Yeah-like maybe racing the boulevards [Lakewood, Bellflower, Artesia, Long Beach, PCH, etc etc] between Bellflower and San Pedro. Hey, I got enough tickets as it was.
    Do you remember Mike Salta Pontiac on N. Long Beach Boulevard? The salesmen would stand on the sidewalk wearing dark glasses, sizing up all the potential customers as they drove up to look at cars.
    What a trip that was.
  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    I don't know where to get them but this reminds me of some trivia about '60s badges.

    The rarest 409 badge is the '65 409 used only from September '64 through January '65. I don't think the '61s had engine identification.

    Very early '65 390 Fords used the same t-shaped emblem as the 352 but this was quickly changed to the diagonally striped badge used through '67.

    I've seen some interesting '50s badging like the Dodge D-500 and the Stude T-10. I think Hudson had a special Twin H emblem for its dual carb cars.
  • wevkwevk Posts: 179
    As I recall the plastic Bow Tie (?) emblems on the grill and on the trunk was enhanced by a V when the car was equipped with a 283 and further enhanced with crossed flags when equiped with a 348. Seemed real important when I was a kid!
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,701
    You kept a sharp eye on the fenders of passing cars looking for those little badges on the fenders indicating the car was packing a hot motor.

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    I got to thinking about the correlation between the the two rare badges I mentioned above and I wonder if maybe I'm onto something (good material for a doctoral thesis).

    Both the early '65 390 and 409 badges were very similar to those for lesser engines (352 and 327 respectively) and hard to differentiate at a glance. They were redesigned quickly, maybe because the dealers thought the difference was too subtle to stroke egos. I wonder if anyone here knows the story.

    Andre, does your encyclopedic knowledge extend back that far?
  • Pierrepont Landing (Pierrepont = Stone Bridge). South of Watertown, theres an exit for it off 81!
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,871
    Pierpoint Landing was in Long Beach, CA.
  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    Whichever one had the mile-long hotdogs-and not far away, an amusement park called The Pike, which featured a large rollercoaster.

    Isell-is that rollercoaster still there?
  • This is a good topic!

    I have hundreds of matchbox-type cars (Matchbox, Hot Wheels, other no-name brands). Mostly from the '70s and newer, as I was born in 1983.

    About a dozen large die-cast models, and some built plastic kits including a 1977 Ford Pinto, a 1979 Ford Courier and a 1981 Dodge Omni 024. I have weird tastes, I admit it! I got into an eBay model kit buying spree a few years ago, so I've got a whole table full of sealed MPC kits from the '70s and '80s (including the awesome 1976 Chevette Rally...I'm going to have to build that one eventually) that I bought and couldn't bring myself to open up and start tinkering with. They'll be worth something someday, I tell you! :-)

    I also have every issue of Road and Track, Motor Trend and Car and Driver going back to 1991. My first was the 1991 MT Car of the Year issue, with the '91 Caprice on the cover.

    And then, there's the 4,000+ hubcaps. But I'm sort-of in the business, so those are "inventory" not a "collection" :-)

    -Andrew L
  • OK, I thought you guys might get a kick out of this. Here are some pics of my basement.


    Some of my wheel covers:


    image


    Some alloy wheel center caps:


    image


    95% of this stuff was found on the road. People don't realize how many hubcaps are lying around until they see them all in one place :-) Disclaimer: Please don't post asking to buy caps from me. I don't want Edmunds giving me the boot for violating their TOS.


    -Andrew L

  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,701
    On a country road that had a lot of traffic and potholes in it. It was hubcap/wheel cover city but I wasn't interested in piling them up so I just propped em up against a tree so the owner could see it next time he drove thru.

    E-mail me if you want to add a '71 Fiat hubcap to your ..uh..inventory.

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    Hey, I saw one I want!

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  • ghuletghulet Posts: 2,628
    ...dammit, I wish I would have kept my collection going. I had quite a few hubcaps for a while (big family, grandparents had a big garage with lots of leftovers, then I found a lot roadside), then I ditched them in one of my apartments. Maybe I should go back and see if they're still there (nothing too serious, but I had a full set of '68 Camaro caps, some '60s Pontiac low-line caps, a '69 finned Chevy cap--the Caprice/Vette type) and a bunch of assorted stuff, mostly '70s GM). Nice collection you have there!!
  • ghulet-

    By "Pontiac low-line", do you mean the small dog-dish type caps? If so, those are very popular in good condition, especially on eBay. I've seen them go for upwards of $100/set when really nice.

    Most of my caps are from about 1980 to the present, though I have a fair amount of '70s stuff and a few from the '50s and '60s. Occasionally, I'll happen upon a spot where there was a pothole 20 years ago, and I'll find a bunch of vintage caps lying in the bushes.

    -Andrew L
  • ghuletghulet Posts: 2,628
    ...I'm pretty sure they are the standard big car caps for the '64 (and it was a full set, in remarkable condition, IIRC). I might have to find out if my caps are still at my old apartment on the porch (I really wouldn't be surprised, even though it was like six years ago).
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,170
    First new post in this reborn forum.

    I have a weak spot for vintage diecast cars. I also love 'Autocar' magazines and most old car books.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    What's your favorite scale ratio?

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,170
    Depends on the series of cars. Right now I go for vintage diecast - not just toys of old cars, but old toys, all of which are a good 15-20 years older than me. I like the Matchbox cars as they are in roughly 1:60 scale - I have about 100 of them on my TV cabinet. I also like the roughly 1:35-1:43 Dinky and Corgi cars from the same period. Matchbox Yesteryears are also roughly this size.

    Lately I've thought of seeking out some of the cars I had as a kid, ones that got destroyed in play. I had many 1:24 scale Burago cars, those were pretty cool. 1:18 cars seem too big for any large scale collection - I only have a few nowadays.
  • lemmerlemmer Posts: 2,676
    I regularly buy Matchbox and Hot Wheels cars for my little girls, aged 2 and 6, who want nothing to do with them.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,170
    Then you can keep em for yourself

    Some of the older ones have been proven to be a decent enough investment over the past 10-15 years too
  • lemmerlemmer Posts: 2,676
    My older one actually turned six today. I mixed in a Hot Wheels car (Ferrari F430) with all of her Barbie and Disney princess presents.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,170
    A present for you?

    You should shop ebay and mix in some vintage models with her next batch of toys...I think those items will remain strong in the market, and should at least hold their value, if not continue to inflate.

    A couple years ago I bought an old Hot Wheels case on ebay, containing 10 cars. I am more of a Matchbox guy, so I put them on ebay...averaged about $50/car.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    Wow...are they worth that bid?

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