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2013 and Earlier - Toyota 4Runner Prices Paid and Buying Experience

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  • I bought a used 2005 SR5 with full leather seating. After further review, I am not aware that this is an option on this model. Maybe I lucked out as a local Volvo dealer took the car as a corporate fleet trade in. They couldn't sell the vehicle and took multiple price reductions. The car only has 12k miles and lots of great options, and rides and looks like new. I paid just under 21k for it and think I did ok, but would like any feedback, as this is my 1st 4runner.
  • woodywwwoodyww Posts: 1,797
    Sounds like a great deal to me, esp. with those miles. I'd think the leather was after-market, dealer added, except for the corporate fleet wrinkle (?).

    Whatever, it's got leather! Does it have a S/R?
  • Yeah....actually has a moonroof. The dealer really didn't know much about the vehicle, as it was a Volvo dealership. The only way I figured it's a sport model is from the carfax report.
  • So I just bought a 2007 4runner, 4x4, V6, sunroof, tonneau cover, floor mats, tow package for 750 less than invoice, or just over 28k (it was like 28,100 or something) + tax title, etc.

    Is this a good deal? This is in socal area, by the by.

    Thanks
    PS, the 4runner is soooo killer, love it, taking it to desert over new years for thorough 4x4 workout!!!
  • $750 less than invoice! That is a good deal! What is the total MSRP of your vehicle if you don't mind? Where did you buy this vehicle? I just offered $29500 (27600 + 6.25%tax +title)drive out price for a 2007 sport edition 4Runner, 4x2, V6, sunroof, extra mile option package A0 and vehicle shield package. But the deal did not go through. The total MSRP is $33143. You must have excellent negotiation skill to get price less than invoice. Can you tell me the trick or suggestion?
  • I went through autoland, they did all the negotiations for me. I just signed the paperwork and they delivered the car I wanted. That is the trick. I highly recommend autoland. They worked out a good deal for me.
  • I was just wondering if any one out there owns a 2006 with the AWD-All Wheel Drive system. I am not that familiar with this. I know that the Jeep i owned several years ago had the quadtrac.JUNKKKKKKKKKKKK. It was at the shop more than in my driveway and that has a lot to do with it. The rear ends, transfer case, etc. it had the awd system. I know that the runner is different in that way but i am still needing a little more info if anyone can share, it would be appreciated. I am just very uncomfortable not knowing that much about this one. I really love the ride of the vehicle and the handling seems to be nice also. I really like the power compared to the v6. I don't know about the gas mileage though. If i do purchase this one i will be using it to pull a car & trailer. If anyone can shed some light on this also i could use all the insight i can get. Thanks...Toxic 98
  • If there is one thing Toyota engineers knows how to build, it's an AWD system. They've been doing it on the legendary Land Cruiser since day one w/the best reliability record of any SUV.
  • I purchased a 2005 SR5 v6, no leather. Came with a roof rack, 4wd, hitch, tonneu, think that's about it. Had just >30k miles. Perfect condition inside and out, used to be a Hertz vehicle so it was maintained and never smoked in, although it may have been driven hard by some people. I negotiated down to $24k from $26k sticker ($22,800 + my p.o.s. '95 Civic that was beat up like hell and still ran well with 160k on it). I think I did ok, cars like this in MN are expensive due to crappy winter weather, but I will love driving it in snow, if we ever get any! I think I did ok, but you did better especially if your ride is 4x4.
    My 1st 4runner also, congrats!
  • How can I find a fair price for a 2006 limited 4runner 4x4 V-8 with the following options added (it's a demo with 4,500 miles):

    JBL Synthesis Am/Fm 6-Disc In-Dash Cd
    side-curtain airbags
    extra mile option B

    I can look on edmunds for the price without it being a demo with 4,500 miles but I don't know how to figure it with the miles.
  • Does anyone have an idea of how much to take off the price of a 2007 limited 4runner for demo miles? Thanks!
  • Hi all I just purchased a new 2007 4RUNNER sr5 over the weekend for $26012.00 O.T.D...sale price was $23688.00...sticker was $29219.00....was on my way to purchased a new jeep commander after looking at various different suv's for the last 6 weeks or so, and was just looking thru the La Times and saw that most toyota dealers are blowing out 07's...cheapest dealer was power toyota of cerritos...came nicely loaded with what we needed..tow package ,roof rack & rail's..running boards..climate control & my wife's ipod plugs straight in!..sounds great...I looked at toyota 4runner's before but decided they where to expensive.
    We are really glad fate led us to buying this vehicle..already put 200 miles on it and drive's great..and my wife even got the color she wanted....we are coming from a jeep liberty 2002 with over 60,000 trouble free miles and are hopeing that the toyota will be just as good
  • Toxic, look under "discussions" "systems explained" and be sure to read the manual. I too had a Grand Cherokee that nickel and dimed me to death. My 03 V8 Ltd is a great vehicle on the road. Have pulled a trailer (car dolly) and Civic 650mi to Dallas (from Col Spgs, CO ) and could hardly tell it was there, but it was light weight for the 4R. I don't plan on towing trailers (did that with the Jeep). My gas mileage is terrible though. Good Luck. Jollygreen1
  • gls69gls69 Posts: 24
    Two dealers in the Sacramento area don't have any 4-runner Limiteds with V-8 in stock. One salesman said"> they are being held up in San Francisco due to a trailer hitch or wiring problem. Does anyone know if this is valid? How serious is the problem and how soon will they resolve it?
  • That is an amazing deal, the best I ever heard of. Wish that I could get such one.
  • 2007 4Runner Sport Edition V6 4x2 : MSRP before options: $29,975

    Options (seem to be the basic standard with this vehicle):
    CF – Floor mats & Cargo mat -- $199
    NE – Leather steering and shift w/cruise control and audio controls --
    RL – Daytime running lights -- $40
    TO Weight carrying hitch and ball mount kit -- $430

    TOTAL MSRP = $31,289
    Purchase Price before $750 rebate: $27,247
    Price Paid OTD: (after rebate, tax, title, and fees) = $28,930

    I bought mine in Southern California, December 2006, New Year's Eve. Here’s how the deal went down:

    Sent out mass quote from Edmunds.com. Received detailed quote by email from one dealer ($27,247 before $750 factory rebate: includes all factory to dealer fees including destination charge).

    Unfortunately that dealer did not have the color I wanted and did not offer to bring the vehicle I wanted in from another dealer. So I asked two other dealers to match his quote, one dealer was nearby, the other was a very high-volume dealer known for discount pricing, but that was located nearly 100 miles away. The farther dealer gave me a quote of $27,700 for the car I wanted; my online research also indicated that this dealer was known to be a straight shooter.

    I also got a quote (by email) for the trade-in value of my five-year old car that was in good shape but had 150,000 highway miles on it. That quote was $4,000. The Kelley blue book for my trade-in is between $5,900 and $7,150. Edmunds trade-in value is $6,549.

    My goal was to get the price at vehicle at $27,247 before $750 factory rebate: including all factory to dealer fees including destination charge, and to get no less than $6500 for my trade-in. My goal was also to do the deal entirely by email and phone. If possible I also wanted to do the deal with the salesperson who did my test drive (that is, if the dealership would do a fast, efficient deal at a price that worked for me).

    I did all my research in advance, knew what I wanted when I got to the dealership, and kept the salesperson’s time down to what was required to test drive two cars. I also started the process at the end of the month, knowing that is when dealerships are most motivated to deal. My salesperson was a nice person who correctly identified me as a low-maintenance, no-hassle bargain shopper. I communicated my expectations and the deal I wanted from the start. My salesperson was also new, knew nothing about the vehicle, and was unable to make the deal over the phone. I was informed that I had to come in before an agreement could be made as to price. No doubt this was a directive handed down by the general manager. Since this dealership was convenient and had the car I wanted, and because I wanted to give this salesperson the sale, I agreed to come in -- after restating my desire not to be met with all the old-school selling techniques.

    Upon arrival at the dealership I was met by the “sales trainer” and from there all the expected shenanigans began: ex. Take control of the “up” (customer) by making them take another test drive, start off with a “best deal” price $1,000 over the lowest quote from the other dealership, haggle back and forth, question my knowledge of car pricing, call the other dealer’s integrity in question, multiple trips into the GM’s office, etc. Then I let slip that I had a trade-in and suddenly they were able to match the other dealer’s price. They came back with an offer of $4,000 on the trade-in, which is at least half the resale value. Repeated haggling continues, we get from $4,000 to $5,400 in three steps. I then state, “I need a minute to think about it, can we take a break while I step outside?” To which the sales trainer replies, “No.” At that point I had had enough, requested my keys back, wished all a good day, and left. The trainer told me I could not get a better deal anywhere and that I would be back.

    He was half right – seven days later on the last day of the month I called the original sales person, apologized for the direction the deal had taken, and said that I was driving to the other dealership to buy the car (which I was), but that – in one last effort to keep the deal local – I would take the car at the price I wanted plus $6,000 for the trade-in, and on the condition that the sales trainer was not visible during the deal. Fifteen minutes later we had a deal. But even then – when I signed the final piece of paperwork -- they gave me the option to keep the installed dealer alarm (after telling me the factory alarm would not stop thieves) for a mere $650 discounted from $900+ because it would cost them money to remove it. When I pointed out that the factory option alarm had an MSRP of $359 they told me that theirs was a better alarm and all the cost was in installation labor. I declined – although I secretly feared that the dealer might be selling the addresses of under-alarmed customers to a ring of car thieves ;-). When I asked how long it would take to remove the alarm I was told it would only be five minutes, and in fact that’s how long it took. So apparently this Super Alarm is a bear to install, but really easy to get out.

    In hindsight, it was a big hassle and if I did it again I would wait until a dealer who had the car I wanted gave me the quote I wanted by email. Or I could have saved some time in trade for a higher price through fitzmall.com or the like. Still, I made the deal that worked for me and now I have a sweet ride.

    Lessons learned: (1) Get financing in advance from your credit union (I did) (2) Get cost information on vehicle and options from Edmunds.com and Consumerreports.org (3) Do your research in advance and know what you want to pay for the car, and how much time/energy you are willing to trade to get that price (4) Get multiple quotes online to establish a baseline negotiating price (5) Be willing to walk if the dealer is not willing to deal on your terms.

    Dealerships will separate you from your money in five ways (1) Purchase price of vehicle (2) Options (3) Trade-in price for your old vehicle (4) Financing (5) Service. The first four are up to you to negotiate. With regards to financing, you really need to get that set up in advance. If you do it at the dealership it’s the last part of the deal and you will be tired and not in a position to negotiate. A good credit union can do as well or better than a dealer, unless there is special factory financing available. Either way, having a fall back position is where you want to start from. Don’t worry about cheating the dealer – they won’t sell you the vehicle unless there’s something in it for them. My only concern with regards to the dealership is to make a best effort to stick with the salesperson that gave me the test ride.

    Continued in next post due to word count limit....
  • Continued from previous post...

    To wrap it up, I was not unrealistic in my expectations; the fact that I own a new 4Runner is proof of that. But I did want the best deal I could get and I communicated that up front. My goal was to get the best deal that month from a dealer who wanted to make that deal. I was willing to flex on the price if the dealer could show me – contrary to my research – that I was off base. In the end I went back with this dealer because the deal was almost there, the other dealer was 100 miles away (and might take the same haggle-ad-naseum approach), and I wanted to stick with the original sales person.

    Good luck with your deal, and thanks to all the previous posters for the information that helped me make mine.
  • Let me begin by saying that I have no vested interest in ANY manufacturer, brand or dealership. Suffice it to say, however, I have spent the past three weeks attempting to buy a new SUV. Following is my experience and is intended as FYI only.

    January 4, I traded my '01 Trooper LS 2WD w/70K on the clock (in great condition, BTW) for a new '06 Pathfinder LE 2WD (120 miles on the odo). Super Black w/tan leather. This is one great looking truck, and the folks at Champion Nissan in Katy, Texas, seriously rock!

    MSRP = $34,345. Floor/cargo mats were the only factory option, and there were no dealer add-ons. Had all the extensive list of standard LE equipment, which includes a moonroof.

    Sale Price = $30,204, after $1,000 rebate. They threw in a hitch ball and mount, front window tint and ashtray kit.

    OTD = $27,393 after trade-in. That includes TTL of $1,795 and $1,395 for a 72/75,000 Security Plus Gold Preferred (Nissan) service agreement.

    I probably could have got a couple thousand more for the Trooper by selling it myself. But, after getting NO inquiries on it after a week on THE used vehicle website, I bit the bullet.

    I actually tried buying a new Toyota 4Runner from THE Toyota dealer in my neighborhood. Aside from their meat-market environment, that was such a miserable experience that I have sworn I will never set foot in another Toyota store! Their best deal on a similarly equipped Limited Demo w/5,200 miles, but no moonroof or extended service agreement, would have been $29,084 OTD. At that price, and with Toyota's incentive APR, I would have saved exactly $1,200 ($20 a month for 60 months) compared to the Pathy. But the lack of a moonroof ($900) and service agreement ($1400), and a penalty for the Demo miles (~$2600) offset that savings by roughly $3,700. And, I don't have to live with that Toyota dealer's poor sales and service reputation.

    To cap it all off, my Toyota salesman called me at 8:30 p.m. New Years night to tell me that he and his sales manager decided to back out of my deal and sell the car to someone else, ignoring the fact that I had already signed all the necessary paperwork, including the finance contract with Toyota Motor Credit! I have since learned that my dealer's conduct and attitude is typical of Toyota dealers in general. If you doubt that statement, click here. I'm in Texas. Research dealers in your own state for more info.

    I am one very happy camper! :) However, YMMV!
  • As a follow up . . . surely there is someone out there who remembers the Hull-Dobbs sales approach - take the keys to your car, through them up on the roof of the building, and refuse to give them back until you've made a deal with them. Toyota dealers (mine blatantly admitted it) subscribe to that practice 40 years later.
  • migotzmigotz Posts: 1
    I purchased a SR5 4x4, standard options last September.
    So far I love the vehicle, but my only regret is that I did not get all the option.

    So I am now thinking of trading it in and getting a Limited, fully loaded model. Is this a dumb/stupid idea? Has anyone done this or have any experience along these lines?

    Thanks.
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