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Ford Fusion/Mercury Milan

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Comments

  • ggma1126ggma1126 Posts: 1
    Just read that mercury brand may be discontinued - shame as I love my Milan !!
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Other than exterior styling and interior tweaks, chances are you'd love a Fusion too. That's part of the reason Mercury is going away, really.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Took my 2006 Ford Fusion SEL V6 on a road trip and averaged 30.1MPG doing 75MPH!! . This car just cruised right along, taking hills and curves like it was on rails. I just smiled when I saw the MPG. This car now has over 55,000 trouble free and squeak free miles on it. I know now I made the right choice over an Accord/Camry. :)
  • vibsrvibsr Posts: 47
    We rented a Fusion SEL for a road trip from Indianapolis, Indiana to the Missouri Ozarks. It was a 4 cylinder with a 6-speed automatic. The car was fairly responsive, great on gas, and it handled well. What took some getting used to was automatic downshifting of the transmission while going DOWNHILL with the cruise control engaged at 65 mph. Here's the scenario: Travelling south of Springfield, MO on state highway 65, we encountered several steep inclines and declines which are characteristic of the area. With the cruise set at any given speed, many cars would creep past the set speed going downhill --- but not this one! With the cruise set at 65, the computer will signal the transaxle to downshift to what seems like 2 gears (6th to 4th) to maintain the set road speed. This is a 4-cylinder doing 2000 silent RPMs at 65 mph, and suddenly jumping to 4500 RPMs to maintain that speed. Yes, it was loud. At least it was far away from the 7500 RPM redline, and the downshifts were smooth. Six speeds offer lots of flexibility in situations like this. I thoroughly understand the logic.

    After putting 1300 miles on the car, my impression was favorable overall. Ford has a real winner here.
  • xmechxmech Posts: 90
    I found that cruise control downshift unusual, too. I don't mind it, but never encountered it on another car before. Mentioned it on a Fusion thread and no one thought much of it... I am a little concerned for long term wear and tear on the engine doing all that compression breaking down som long steep hills between San Diego and Phoenix, which I drive a few times a year.
  • subearusubearu Posts: 3,613
    Our '02 MPV did it do an extent (and even the double downshift too), so I think it is more common on recent year vehicles with electronically controlled trannies. I haven't noticed it on our '10 FFH but haven't really had to descend too many steep hills yet.

    -Brian
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Your redline should be in the 6,500RPM range. Perhaps it was a typo, but didn't want you tearing up your engine (although the electronic rev limiter should save you).
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,723
    I am a little concerned for long term wear and tear on the engine doing all that compression breaking down som long steep hills between San Diego and Phoenix, which I drive a few times a year.

    First, it's braking, not breaking. And you won't break anything by doing it. The computer won't let the transmission shift into any gear that would damage anything. And using engine braking a few times a year certainly won't hurt anything.

    Nothing at all to worry about.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    There's a steep hill that I ascend and descend 4x daily on my way to work (leaving for lunch). So steep that I can floor my Accord at 35 MPH in second gear and it'll simply maintain that speed. It doesn't take more than 15 seconds to climb it (or come down it; its a curve that starts and stops at a traffic light at the bottom of the hill), but to keep my brakes from cooking, I drop my car into "2" every day when descending it. It raises my RPMs to around 3k when coming down it, because I'm usually around 40 MPH at the top of it. No damage done, no burning tranny fluid, and best of all, no cooking brakes.
  • savethelandsavetheland Posts: 671
    Engine braking is a preferred technique if you go downhill. If you ever drove car with manual transmission you will understand me. So kudos to Ford for implementing this feature. The last thing you want is to use brakes during long decent. It will overheat brakes and create a dangerous situation.
  • dmathews3dmathews3 Posts: 1,739
    I can see using engine braking on a long steep hill but not as a everyday feature as it can cause wear and tear on the drivetrain. I feel it is a whole lot cheaper to replace some brake pads and turn the rotors than to pull and rebuild a tranny or clutch on a FWD car. But again that is my opinion and a few mechanics I have posed the question too. I'm sure this is one of those questions on which is better Ford or Chevy.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I think its a matter of using it in moderation. It wouldn't be healthy in the long-run to rev your car to 6000 RPM everytime you slow down on an off-ramp from the highway, but to shift down a gear or two and raise RPMs by 1000 or 1500 or so to assist your brakes is something that shouldn't be particularly detrimental. In fact, my Honda (and many others I'm sure) will drop from 5th to 3rd when the brakes are applied going downhill under 55 mph, raising RPMs from 1800 to about 3000.
  • newowner10newowner10 Posts: 227
    Why do you believe that using the engine for braking down a long hill would hurt the engine or transmission? There is no more strain on the drive train going up the hill. The engine is just putting drag on the drivetrain. The engine is just coasting.
  • xmechxmech Posts: 90
    Because all the parts (especially like rings, valves) which are primarily subjected to pressure loads, are subjected to vacuum loads. Maybe with modern engines and materials it's not a big deal, but I thought I heard way back when that doing that excessively could cause unnecessary wear and tear. Like mentioned earlier, I'd rather replace my brake pads a few more times over the life of the car than the engine. Of course, when going down a long hill you still want to have brakes left by the time you reach the bottom, so there is a balance thing. Live, die, whatever! :shades:

    Now that I think about it, while running down that long hill compression braking, I was thinking, man, my MPG should go way up, with that 'aggressive fuel cut-off scheduling' I read Ford had worked on for the 2010, but I watched my MPG going down. :cry: Maybe all the fuel running to the front of the tank threw it off.
  • dmathews3dmathews3 Posts: 1,739
    Going up a hill the stress is gradually built up where as going down the hill you drop a gear or two and the stress is put on the sytem all at once and it is like a shock to the drive train. Kind of like reving the engine and popping the clutch. Do that to many times and something gives. I just believe it is a whole lot cheaper to rebuild the brakes than to rebuild the tranny. Most likely just the price of pulling the tranny would cover a couple brake jobs. Now if you are the type of person who trades/sell their cars before the warranty goes than it should be cheaper to downshift since at that point in time the warranty should cover the drive train compared to having to pay for new brakes.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Well, at 212,000 miles my transmission is still going strong with nary a botched shift. No lie, the rear brake shoes are the ones that came on the car in November of 1995. The discs were replaced at 130k and haven't been since then.

    I wouldn't recommend shifting down to increase the revs by over 2,000 from their current state in the current gear (dropping from 2nd to 1st at 30 MPH is likely a bad idea), but a less drastic drop at that speed, say 3rd to 2nd, should be fine.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,723
    If it was detrimental to the drivetrain the PCM wouldn't do it. Period.
  • dmathews3dmathews3 Posts: 1,739
    Ya right. So since my car can to 6000rpms in second gear and if I leave tranny in 2nd gear it will stay at that speed till the engine blows its ok because the PCM wouldn't let me do that if it was detrmental to the engine. Better think again.
  • newowner10newowner10 Posts: 227
    The only difference the engine see is no explosion in the cylinder on the power stroke. I agree with other posters that I am not suggesting down shifting so the engine is at 4500 RPM. The automatic transmission does not bang into the next gear when you down shift the automatic.

    I would agree that down shifting as you come to stop sign is not a good idea, that is what brakes are for. If you are going down a mile long hill you will either have to apply the brakes 5 seconds and coast for ten seconds or shift to third gear.
    We may all agree if you slow the car first and then drop to the lower gear no damage will be done.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,723
    So you think Ford engines can't run at 6K rpm for a few minutes at a time without blowing up?
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I'd be willing to bet the implication is that it produces more engine wear than it is worth, not that it'd "blow up" after a few minutes.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,723
    Direct quote:

    Ya right. So since my car can to 6000rpms in second gear and if I leave tranny in 2nd gear it will stay at that speed till the engine blows
  • newowner10newowner10 Posts: 227
    It must be a real steep hill for the engine to stay at 6000 rpm for more than a few seconds if you are not pressing the accelerator.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Eh, sarcasm doesn't always translate across text messages. Perhaps that was the case here. I'm agree with ya kirb, just trying to make sense of it.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Not sure why you're replying to me, but I'd agree. Anything over about 3,500 RPM should reign in the speed pretty quickly.
  • urnewsurnews Posts: 668
    What's a PCM?
  • urnewsurnews Posts: 668
    I looked it up on the Internet: PCM = Powertrain Control Module
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,723
    It's the computer Boz. It controls the shifting of the transmission and it won't downshift if the RPM is too high.
  • savethelandsavetheland Posts: 671
    Using engine breaking is recommended for driving on slippery roads, like driving on the snow. You do not want to use brakes esp on turns. I actually do not like that cars with automatic transmission do not tend to brake with engine. It make difficult to control car. Braking by engine does not mean it jumps to 6000 rpms. It slows car gradually if you do not press accelerator and then switches the gears at appropriate moment. You have to sync engine rpms with speed before changing gears otherwise you will damage transmission. That is when you can use brakes. I hope Ford engineers are not stupid and know all this facts. So do not worry too much.
  • podpod Posts: 176
    edited July 2010
    Given the sales success and excellent frequency of repair record that Ford has established over the past 5 years or so, wouldn't it be time for the company to consider raising its warranty period from the standard 3/36,000 to at least 4/48,000?
    It would distinguish them from the other domestics and support the franchise dealers who do all the warranty repair for the most part. The Koreans offer 5/60,000 for similarly priced vehicles. BMW has gone to 4/48,000 but for the price they ask they can afford to. Cars are so much more reliable now, isn't it time to reconsider the dated 3/36,000 standard. It would be another reason to choose Ford over GM, Chrysler, etc. As a Ford owner for the past 20 years I have had no major warranty repairs, which, I expect, is typical. I think there are a number of people who are going with the new Hyundai Sonata, for example, rather than the Fusion/Milan I-4 based on the longer warranty. There may be other features that entice with the new Sonata the 200hp or the sheet metal but when you drive both you realize that the Koreans haven't figured out the suspension challenges.
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