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Chevrolet Cobalt

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Comments

  • richards38richards38 Posts: 606
    Good reason not to buy Cobalt is that it was just introduced and the likelyhood of trouble is greater now than it'll be after a year of production.

    The Dodge is an old car now that will be replaced by an all-new model in a few months, so it's probably as good as a fast Neon gets, but it'll be obsolete VERY soon..........Richard
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    ION Redline lists for $19,995 for 2006 is the best reason to look at one. Bargoon for a 205hp pocket rocket.
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    I'd buy a Mustang for $20K, or if FWD is a requirement, the Accord or G6 Coupe. The Cobalt SS is overpriced, the ION looks odd, and the Neon has zero resale. Neon would be fast though, if ya like to spin front wheels. New Civic, soon to appear, will have 140HP, and a new look. And for $20k you can get a used Corvette if you have the need for speed. Souped up econo cars have traditionally low resale, and generally look like souped up econo cars. Best Cobalt would be a base engine. :shades:
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    I think people here are generally comparing compacts, not Mustangs and Corvettes.
  • why do we have to have these messege boards and all, why cant people just go to a dealer and be man enough to say, let me test it out and go riding and may the best car tested win ur mind and soul that goes into the engine and lets you enjoy.

    i bet half the people in this chat have never ridden in a cobalt, i have and it wasnt that exciting, well, the manual drive was, but the auto was awful, its just a car
  • i did test drive my cobalt, and it was perfect, it wasn't until about a month 1/2 until the leak started happening, i baught the car in april. i do have a cobalt, i've taken the car into the dealership 2 times for them to fix the leak and it's still leaking, this forum is supposed to help people with their problems in their cobalt or to talk about the fun they've have. but in my case, there's a problem, the floorboard is flooded, and it smells really bad, and it's a new car, this is not what i had bargined for when i baught a new car. and yes, it is very exciting driving my car. it might not have been for you, but this is my first brand new car i have ever baught. so yeah, now you should understand why i love my car so much, and why it's pissing me off so bad that there's a problem with it and i've only had it for 4 months. so if you don't have any information to help someone with their problem, then quit criticizing other people, and stop coming to this chat. :mad:
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    " I think people here are generally comparing compacts, not Mustangs and Corvettes. "

    --end quote--

    Ah yes, a compact car should have a compact price. If spending more money, you can move it on up a notch. If you want to pay big bucks for a smaller package, you can get an Acura for $20- 22K range.
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    Given that a Corvette or a Mustang burns a lot more gas and costs more in insurance, it's not just simply a matter of size for many people.

    A baby Acura is an option though it is a bit more.
  • im going to sell it, nd get a SS non supercharged cobalt, and just stock it up, with a turbo and air coolent pieces

    i cant decide to supercharge it or turbo, if i turboed i could get the button i had in my old volvo
  • So, the water leak due to a disconnected drain from the sunroof got fixed. Now, the brake light has been coming on (no...not ABS...my car does not have ABS brakes), and the seal is coming off of the glass on the sunroof! To top it off, the dealers in the area that I'm going to school SUCK, so I'm taking it back home to my preferred dealership....which is a huge inconvenience in itself. Anyone have any tips on how to get a new vehicle? So far, this car does not fall under Lemon Law...any suggestions on how to deal with this?? By the way, I'm leasing it... :confuse:
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    As far as I know, you are kinda stuck. Never lease a car, and seldom buy an American car new. There are exceptions, as in super deals on base models. Usually a lease or buying new results in huge losses. Buy domestic used, and never-never lease.

    I would contact the local district rep. and talk it all over. Plead you case and let them know that what happens with this leasing experience will effect how you view the GM company. They may wish to keep a customer, and their friends by backing you 100%. I would not count on that however, from what I hear most of the car manufacturers don't really appear to care how the customer feels about the auto they own, or how it effects the way you convey the experience to others. Sure, when all is going well, they are your friend. When something happens which could cost the corporation a buck, look out, the friendship may be over. You are leasing a first year car made by GM. You must expect at least 3 or more things which they got wrong. My last GM was in 8 times or more to fix this and that. This should not be the case though with a car built after 2001.

    I bought an American make car, which I plan to keep between 3 to 7 years, depending on how good it is and my needs at the time. This is the first American car since 1994, so we will see how it goes. If it proves to be good, as it has so far - fine! If the car or the company lets me down, this would be the last American car. So far my PT Cruiser has been flawless - a first for me and an American brand.

    Loren
  • poncho167poncho167 Posts: 1,178
    The resale of a GM or any American car should be going up soon if they keep with the little to no rebate incentative program. Rebates are really no rebate when you go to sell or trade in a car. Basically that $3000 rebate will come off the bottom line at resale. Putting money on the hood is only showing that it was overpriced to begin with.

    Toyota has a real bad reputation in covering repairs also. Their big oil sledge problem made them finally admit that they were at fault, not the consumer who they said didn't maintain the car.
  • johnclineiijohnclineii Posts: 2,287
    Chrysler is NOT joining the value pricing movement, and in fact is raising the price on most of its 2006's.

    It is going to get interesting...

    How this will affect GM/Ford pricing (including Cobalt) remains to be seen.
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    " The resale of a GM or any American car should be going up soon if they keep with the little to no rebate incentive program. Rebates are really no rebate when you go to sell or trade in a car. Basically that $3000 rebate will come off the bottom line at resale. Putting money on the hood is only showing that it was overpriced to begin with.

    Toyota has a real bad reputation in covering repairs also. Their big oil sledge problem made them finally admit that they were at fault, not the consumer who they said didn't maintain the car. "

    --end quote--

    You did not by any chance miss the current employee pricing scheme thing now did ya?
    And the continuation of the same for an extra month. And the lowering of prices on next year models. All this adds up to poor resale later on. As for the Cobalt, Intellichoice.com rates the basic 4 dr. as average resale, and all the 2 dr. as worse than average. The above base models all rate worse than average, which is about right. It kinda makes sense in that the more basic, base models are pretty low priced to begin with and offer up a car with a pretty good engine for fuel efficiency and power.

    As for Toyota, I have had no problems with the services offered from Toyota dealerships. That said, I did NOT have a major problem. Like I said before, they are all your friends until something major happens to the car. When the worse happens, is when you will find out just how far a company and a dealership is on your side. Keep in mind now, Toyota never had an oil sledge problem, but rather an oil sludge problem. Just to keep the records straight ;) Oil sledge problems happen mainly during NASCAR events - just kidding!

    Who really does have the worst record for covering repairs on autos? Is there an accurate way to gauge this? I take it JD Powers surveys people. A common villain, if gauged by posts on Edmund's may point to VW, but is this accurate? What if some people, or group of people are just more active on message boards? How would you rate GM? I have a feeling they are not the worse of the bunch. But what does a feeling count up as - nothing. Data from C.R. would indicated better cars since 2001 - So I will believe that to be pretty much a fact.

    Loren
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    Here in Virginia we kind of embrace foreign makes, so there are a lot of Mazdas, Hondas, Toyotas, Hyundais and Kias running around. Honestly, I've seen maybe one or two Cobalts here on the roads in Richmond.

    But last week I spent five days in Pittsburgh -- and gauging by that city's history and the thousands of cars I saw during my trip, Pittsburgh is a very "buy American" place. And my friends, I've never seen so many Cobalts in all my life! They really are popular there, and I think I got to see every color, body style and option available. I actually got to liking them! I think GM has a winner here -- especially with the pricing thing.

    Meade
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    People that live in areas where there is industry realize more than people elsewhere that buying products made here is important to the economy and jobs. In the same way these days people just buy what's cheap at Walmart essentially exporting jobs to China.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    Here in Richmond we're home to Philip Morris and have major (i.e. several-hundred-acre plants for) Kraft, Dupont, Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal), Nabisco, Hercules, AMF, and several others. Just down the road we have an Anheuser-Busch factory and the largest Ford truck assembly plant in the country. These days, a lot of things Americans view as "imports" are built right here in the U.S. (look at Hyundai's new plant in Alabama, for instance). On the same token, many GM products are built offshore ... and here's another GM development, just this week:

    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20050815/ts_afp/usautoasiagm_050815172537

    I think these days, it has more to do with demographics and how you were raised than patriotism. My area of Virginia has seen a lot of influx of people from all areas of the world, especially Asia and Mexico. Pittsburgh, whose newspaper had an article on that city being the least racially diverse of any large American city last Thursday -- I read it while I was there ...

    http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/trib/pittsburgh/s_362447.html

    ... is home to many descendants of steel workers who've been there for generations -- and their parents and grandparents probably bought American cars, so they do too. Remember, we're all immigrants back at one point or another here in the U.S. My family has been here since the late 1700s, and while my dad has two Buicks in his driveway, there's also a Toyota Highlander!

    To make a point out of all this, let me say that to many of today's Americans, I don't think the location of a car brand's home office is the selling point. And neither is the place it's built -- unless they live in the city where the plant's located and take pride in that fact. I think most people just want a reliable car they can afford, with a decent warranty. Maybe that's why many of us here at work were only mildly shocked when our 60-something Operations Manager went out looking for a car to replace his upteenth Chrysler product and came back to work the next day with a brand-new Hyundai Santa Fe, has since talked his daughter into buying one, and is still raving about it two years later!

    In any case, the Cobalt, which like many (but not all) of GM's products, is built right here in the U.S. -- is a very nice car. It's good to see Honda and Toyota squirming a little. Those laurels they've been resting on must be getting a little uncomfortable.

    Meade
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    Some of what you say is true, but my point in the end was many people don't realize the consequences of buying foreign brands or foreign made products. Buying a Hyundai Santa Fe instead of a Saturn VUE benefits workers in Korea, suppliers in Korea and the Korean economy. Similarly you go to you local Walmart and buy some Chinese made furniture for almost nothing instead of buying some home made furniture that costs a little more again does the same thing to the domestic economy. Then these same people wonder why plants are shutting down and jobs are lost..

    I'm certainly not saying people have to buy domestic everything but I think the way things are going, much of the durable good manufactuing in the U.S. is slowly going to die off.

    At any rate, Cobalt is a great car, we agree on that. Maybe not the best, but certainly competitive.
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    please ...

    The discussion about the choice and impact of foreign vs. domestic does not belong here.
  • poncho167poncho167 Posts: 1,178
    The employee discount is much better than putting money on the hood. The trucks/suv's have big discounts with this program because they are selling slow. The cars have a rather small discount in comparison. The employee discount is designed to get people used to paying less for a car without the money on the hood. When GM and the others end this program, it is likely the cars will be repriced to a lower amount, with less emphasis on rebate incentatives. In other words incentives for cars will no longer be the practice and if they continue, they will be much smaller. If I was buying a car right now I sure wouldn't want an employee discount. Give me the previous rebate and I will haggle for the rest. Some dealerships will only go as low as the employee discount.

    Ford's Dell computer giveaway was very successful because instead of the $2000 rebate, they were giving away a $250 laptop that probably cost them $100. People were so stupid/naive thinking it was a good buy when it wasn't. Give me a $2000 rebate and I will by my own computer with a lot left over.
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    The GM deals, like on say a 2005 Monte Carlo included a rebate along with the Employee Discount, and they still stayed parked on the lot. I saw two sitting on one lot for over 30 days, and into the extended discount period. With discounts, these were like somewhere in the lowest $18K plus tax, fees, etc. and came in just around $20K out the door. Why did they still sit on the lot you may ask.... I found a used rental, one year old car which was selling for $12,800 with 27K miles on it. That is how fast they drop in value. I ended up getting a PT on a really good deal.

    So far no price is sticking with any of the GM line I can think of off hand, unless people pay retail sticker on Corvettes. Discounting and deeper discounting to continue. Poor resale to continue. Average resale is possible on some basic models, like the Cobalt.
    Above average to excellent resale, like a Civic -- hard to believe it will happen.

    Ford was offering a Dell computer and $2000, or maybe it was $2,500 off on the Focus here in CA. You got both in the deal. Focus looks well put together. I know, it was not a graceful first couple of years for the new model. Does anyone believe a first year model of Cobalt will not have any strange quirks?

    Loren
  • poncho167poncho167 Posts: 1,178
    The rental car industry is one area that the big three, namely GM and Ford are trying to get away from. As mentioned, that used Monte was low because of the deep discounts that these fleet cars give the agency, who turn around and sell and at a lower price. Ford is or has recently sold its Avis? or Hertz rental car agency. The Taurus models resale was really hurt by these companies.

    Really there is little difference in resale to speak of when compared to a Japanese model when you consider the rebates coming off the msrp. Again a $20,000 car is selling for around $17,000 with a rebate. A car that normally would sell for $15,000 after a couple years is now going for $12-13,000 because of that rebate. So if you plan to sell or trade in that car in a short-term, you will lose more money. Remember most of the loss of a new car comes in the first couple of years. My S10 p/u has comparable resale to a similar Toyota. Maybe because Chevy's last longer?

    The employee discount is making big money for those companies participating. They are getting rid of the older models, and making much more money per sale overall. As you mentioned there still are some rebates left for certain models, but that is much smaller, and people believe that that is as low as the car price will go. I have read that some dealers will not budge lower than the given price. Give me the full rebate of the past, and let me bargain with the car salesman any day. I guarantee I will get a better price than the employee discount.

    As for the Ford Focus, like you mentioned there is still a rebate along with that cheap $250 computer ($100 for dealer). That is a savings of $900 from the previous rebate of $3000 per focus.
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    Well, I looked up an S/10 yr. 2000 vs. Tacoma yr. 2000, and it looks like the S/10 is worth around 40% less, and has many more problem areas to it, so there ya go. A Chevy truck built in the 60's or 70's may last longer than about anything on the road, but today's trucks??? As for the Cobalt, we shall see. Will take a few years to see to see if this car is a leader, follower, or should simply get out of the way. No way to really tell at this point in time. Personally, I would be leery of a first, or second year of any American make, based on historical shortcomings dished out by the big three. Does it mean this particular car will be troublesome - no, of course not. Does it mean I would not be surprised when strange quirks pop up - yes, to be expected. Owning a first of auto is however rewarding in that you get to be there from day one with something fresh and it adds to the excitement of first years ownership. My Dodge Stealth was such a car. It was something really new and unique.

    Loren
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    let's try to stick to the Cobalt here, folks...
  • They are replacing the entire glass piece of the sunroof and reprogrammed something to remedy the brake light issue. I'm so glad that I take my car to a dealership that gives a crap - it's nice when the sales manager remembers me and asks what's going on and seems to care each time I go in - and it's not their fault that Chevrolet has screwed up the Cobalt - but their main goal is taking care of me. Yes, I agree that it is not a good idea to buy a car in its first model year, but I wanted to get rid of my Grand Am before I couldn't get even close to what I owed on it and before I had issues with it that I knew I couldn't afford to fix. Purchasing a new car is not an option for me - I'm a full time college student and support myself - for some of us, leasing is the only affordable option at certain points in our life. I love this car, but am beginning to regret not getting an Impala or Grand Prix for just around $10 more a month...I thought now was a good time to have a fun car, but I guess not! I'm stuck with it!
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    Well before leasing a car, buy a used one if you can not afford a new one. But, like ya said, your in the deal now, so just enjoy the ride. I am sure that they can get the bugs out. My Olds Achieve was in say around 8 times for this n' that, but later on it was fairly reliable for several years. It was not an automotive masterpiece, but it got the job done. All the GMs I have owned had strange things happen to them. They are interesting beasts.

    Loren
  • poncho167poncho167 Posts: 1,178
    I believe I got the magazine right this time.

    Yesterday I was in Dominick's and saw the Cobalt SS vs Acura RSX test. I didn't read the whole thing, but when all was said and done the Cobalt edged the Acura and was declared the winner.

    I would image now that the Honda Civic is getting redone, the Acura is next because that care is nothing to look at and received a lower score in the looks department.
  • vanman1vanman1 Posts: 1,397
    I have seen the pictures of the Civic Si in the new Motor Trend. I can see Chevy adding ponies also though. I think GM is serious about keeping the Cobalt SS competitive.
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