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Nissan Quest 2004+: Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • kaykatzkaykatz Posts: 2
    I set the heater to bi-level, shut off the engine, then restart it, the heater automatically goes to floor position. I have to set it to bi-level every time I get in the van and start it up. Sometimes the heater sets itself to come out of the dash only on start up. It's like the memory function isn't working. Any other heater adjustments I make remain as I left them. Can some one tell me if this is normal?
  • ivan_99ivan_99 Posts: 1,653
    I don’t remember, but does it go off of “Auto” mode when you switch the air flow direction?

    I know that when my wife adjusts the fan speed it goes off of the “Auto” mode…and will stay that way when the van is re-started (annoying…air in my face).

    It sounds like in your situation the Auto mode is still on…and puts the heat to the floor where it should go…I think you need to turn off the Auto mode to have it “save” your setting.

    I just leave it on Auto mode all the time…unless I open all the windows/sunroof.
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    Hi dtownfb,
    If you want the straight scoop on Quest brake problems go to brakeinfo.com click on common brake problems click on lateral runout. All you folks will see that your brake problems are not warped rotors as thought but lateral runout. This site explains the problem PERFECTLY. Again, how the heck could you warp a rotor on a new vehicle at 2000 miles? It's now warped, it,s lateral runout. Check it out.
  • chuck0731chuck0731 Posts: 12
    FYI took my Quest to the dealer today and they told me the SES was on because the fuel injector wasn't working as well as it should. Of course they had to order it, so I'll have to take it back in to the dealer one more time. That trip will make it official; over the two years we've leased this van I've made more trips to the dealer for warranty-covered issues than I have with my last 5 cars (over 20 years) combined.

    In general I love the Quest, and the service dept. has been more than fair, but this whole experience has really soured me on Nissan in general.
  • kaykatzkaykatz Posts: 2
    I've tried all modes. I have turned off the Auto setting, but the same thing happens. Nissan is not being very helpfull in giving me direct answers.
  • exploder750exploder750 Posts: 159
    The site explains instructions for checking lateral runout and on car lathing if needed for a brand new rotor. A brand new rotor can indeed warp in 2000 miles if manufactured using a process that could lead to instability of the original staightness. Lateral runout in and of itself does not develop and get worse from new, it is a function of the deformation (warping) of the metal.
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    hello exploder750. You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink. A brand new rotor on a new vehicle can't warp in 2000 miles, impossible. Unless it's on a Yugo, even then I highly don't think it's possible. Read the article again, slowly, very slowly. Google search lateral runout. Lateral runout does develop and get worse from new. It starts slowly and begins to become noticeable at 2000 miles. That is the definition of lateral runout. I think you would have a heck of a time manufacturing a rotor designed to warp at 2000 miles. What would you use, lead? Thirsty?
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    Are you trying to say that Nissan and all the other car manufactures are trying to save a few bucks on parts quality and instead spend hundreds of times the savings on warranty repairs for rotor problems?Save a couple of bucks per rotor and spend a couple of hundred to make each of them right? Why do OEM rotors cost twice that of aftermarket rotors? No manufacturer would or could do this. The problem lies in the installation of the rotors. Not in the manufacturing process of the rotors. Now IM getting thirsty.
  • exploder750exploder750 Posts: 159
    Absolutely I'm saying this. Nissan in and of themselves are not likely manufacturing these rotors, they are probably coming from a low bid reliable source. In mass production, chances are that a few of these rotors fall outside of spec and will filter thru to assembly. From new, if the rotor face is not parallel to the hub face, or if the rotor face itself is not machined flat, you have a slight amount of lateral runout. This could lead to further distortions requiring machining or replacement. The on car method of lathing is by far the best method, but my prior years of experince with turning distorted rotors (within spec) and having them distort again has made me skeptical of turning in general. No, i would not replace with high buck Nissan brand rotors, I'd search aftermarket. So far (knock on wood) our '04 with 56,000 miles has displayed no rotor issues.
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    Yes, you are proablably right, I don't think Nissan has their own brake rotor plant but as far as Nissan's bid process I really don't think they are going strictly low bid either. You are also right about a very very few of these new rotors being out of spec at the time of installation. All new rotors must be checked with a caliper at time of installation.Out of spec rotors should be rejected. If these out of spec rotors are just slapped on the hubs at the factory and not set up correctly this would cause warpage. This may be a small part of the problem. I believe the vast majority of new vehicle rotor problems are caused by incorrect installation. The rotors are fine. Many of these vehicles have new rotors installed only to have pedal pulsation start as soon as the new rotors have 2000 miles on them. You could slap 100 sets of new rotors on these vehicles and every set will go bad untill you actually machine the new rotors on the vehicle using a hub mounted lathe. The hubs are slightly off, the calipers are off, the brake pads are off, lateral runout. In my case a 2005 Quest developed brake pedal pulsation at 3000 miles. I thought warped rotors at first but not all the symptoms matched classic warped rotors. At 70MPH I could feel a slight pulsation in the steering wheel without touching the brake pedal, almost like a tire out of balance. Long story short dealer used Pro Cut hub mounted lathe and now 15000 miles later rotors are perfect. If I ever do need new rotors I will have the new rotors machined using Pro Cut. Does this make sense?
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    http://www.performanceoiltechnology.com/brakingsystems.htm

    All you folks with rotor problems please check out this website. It explains exactly what the problem is with your rotors. The spoonster
  • exploder750exploder750 Posts: 159
    Spoonster, I think we're on the same page. Here's some food for thought. If the hub itself has a certain amount of lateral runout (ie the hub face is not machined perpendicular to the wheel bearing centerline) and lathing the rotor on the vehicle straightens out the brakes, what would you do about the hub lateral runout that is magnified out onto the wheel? Your wheels would wobble off of the car.
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    After you folks have read this link, I feel I must now take a humble bow and accept all your thanks for solving this rotor issue. You may applaud if you wish.
    The Spoonster
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    The Kings Royal wheels don't wobble
  • exploder750exploder750 Posts: 159
    If your wheels don't wobble your hubs don't have lateral runout, Royal One. LOL
  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    I was about to applaud and thnak you until i saw this post. lol

    that was an interesting article. it seems that the key to the rotor issue is to do the on vehicle machining as opposed to the bench mounted machining. I had my rotors machined back in April 2005 at about 8,000 miles. All has gone well since then. I'm at 37,700 miles now and have done more city driving the last 8 months. I think the rotors are starting to get thin and will need replacing soon.

    My question is how do you insure that they install the rotors correctly to begin with? I don't want to have to worry about lateral runout in 2000 miles.
  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    chuck: did they happen to give you a code for the SES?
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  • chuck0731chuck0731 Posts: 12
    No, they didn't, but I didn't ask. If it helps the invoice they gave me said "28922 DTC FOR P1283 A/F SENSOR1 B2// TESTED FOUND 3 DEFECTIVE FUEL INJ ON BANK 2 PARTS ON ORDER"

    I'll ask when I take it back in (they gave me no idea how long the parts would take to get here). Is there something specific I should be looking for?
  • spoonieboy1spoonieboy1 Posts: 22
    Hey dtownfb, If your rotors developed lateral runout and needed machining at 8000 miles I would bet that your Quest is one of the ones that the hubs were installed slightly off.If you have gone to 37,700 miles after these rotors were machined with no problems this fact further proves my point about lateral runout in prior posts and I would bet your dealer machined your rotors at 8000 miles using a Pro Cut or Hunter hub mounted lathe. I don't think your rotors are getting thin or worn out at 37,700 miles but your brake pads may be getting thin. I would take your van back to whoever machined your rotors, make sure they use a hub mounted lathe, check your rotors with a caliper to see if they are within specs, if the rotors are good just replace the pads and then you may have to have the shop install the hub mounted lathe and run it just to make sure everything is lined up perfectly. I would also use the hub mounted lathe when you install new rotors. If you follow this process you should never again have rotor problems with this Quest.You must make sure that whatever shop does brake work on your Quest has this equipment and is actually trained in it's use. Hope this helps. The Spoonster
This discussion has been closed.