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Oil change/fiascos

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Comments

  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,644
    See answer in your duplicate post:

    HERE

    Try to post in only one topic if you remember.

    thanks

    Host
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    Every manufacturer has their own filter, made by a sub contractor. What I noticed on my Hyundai, is that while AC Delco made a direct replacement, the Hyundai filter had a better bypass valve design, and came in a sealed wrapper such that NOTHING could get into the filter before installation. Such as bugs, and yes, that does happen. :surprise:
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,644
    I have not, from personal experience, seen any grief come to a BMW by using an aftermarket filter, but I have personally witnessed grief coming to Audis (valve lifters not pumping up) and Mercedes diesels (aftermarket filter not tall enough, causing all the oil to by-pass it!) I think MANN filters are pretty darn good.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    Years ago wasn't there a problem with VW engines blowing the gasket out of the oil filter at high rpm's? Don't recall if that was an issue with the OEM filter, aftermarket, or just excess pressure in the engine.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,016
    BMW filters are relatively inexpensive and in my experience they are the best choice. I would also make sure that the shop that changes your oil uses the proper oil. If you'll provide the year and model I can tell you the proper oils to use.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • wtd44wtd44 Posts: 1,211
    Several months ago, our 2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee suffered the loss of about a quart of oil via a base gasket leak in an aftermarket filter. I do recall snugging the filter down at the previous oil change, then loosening it and resnugging it. I mention this, thinking that my adjusting the tightness of the seating may have set the stage for the failure. The leak did not occur until some 1500 miles had passed since the oil change. Maybe the filter was faulty.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    Using AC Delco and a thin film of oil on the gasket, I have never had a gasket failure. Ever.

    Hyundai filters use a molded o-ring sort of gasket. Never had a problem with them, either.

    I have never followed the AC Delco instructions on tightening, either. If you do, you may find a leak. I basically go hand tight, then another 3/4 turn. works great.
  • wtd44wtd44 Posts: 1,211
    The filter that leaked seemed to be made of quite thin metal and seemed light weight.
  • 355f1fun355f1fun Posts: 2
    edited August 2011
    II HAVE A 1999 355F1 BERLINETTA FERRARI WITH ABOUT 18,000 MILES. I REALIZED THAT I HAD NOT CHECKED MY OIL LEVEL FOR A LONG TIME, FREAIKED WHEN THE DIP STICK READ NOTHING!!!!! I AM IN DOWN TOWN LA ON ALAMEDA STREET, AND I COULD ONLY FIND 30 WEIGHT SYNTHETIC OIL. NOT THE 50 I NEED. I CONCLUDE THAT 30 WEIGHT IS BETTER THAN NO OIL AT ALL, SO I PUT 1 QUART IN, AND FIGURE I'LL GET THE BALANCE 50 WEIGHT WHEN I GET HOME AFTER WORK. SOMETHING CAME UP, AND I COULDN'T GET IT. NEXT MORNING WHEN I CHECKED IT, AGAIN I COULD NOT GET A READ. I'M LATE FOR WORK, AND MY OTHER CAR IS IN THE SHOP. I MADE A HUGE MISTAKE AND DECIDE TO PUT 2 QUARTS MORE OF THE 30 WEIGHT, SYNTHETIC, BECAUSE I COULD NOT FIND ANY GAS STATIONS THAT CARRY THE 50. NOW WHEN I CHECK THE DIP STICK, I SCREAM WHEN THE LEVEL SHOWS WAY UP PAST THE FULL LINE.

    WHAT THE HELL SHOULD I DO? IT'S BURNING OUT, AND THE ENGINE SOUNDS LIKE **** ON IDLE. IF I KNEW HOW TO PULL THE PLUG AND DRAIN IT OUT I WOULD, AND GET THE 50 SHE NEEDS. WHAT SHOULD I DO? NOT DRIVE IT, RIGHT? I DON'T HAVE ANOTHER CAR THIS HOLIDAY WEEKEND, BUT I DON'T WANT TO MAKE THINGS WORSE.

    COULD SOMEONE THAT IS AN EXPERT WITH FERRARI HELP ME OUT?

    STUPID MISTAKE,
    355F1NOTHAVINGFUN :confuse:
  • Why aren't you just flat-bedding this vehicle into a Ferrari-savvy repair shop?

    If you overfilled, that may or may not mean anything---at the worst you can cause some seals to leak and damage the catalytic---which isn't great but not terminal either. Personally I wouldn't risk running the car if it is overfilled, smoking and idling badly---regardless if it were a Ferrari or a Toyota because you'll foul your plugs and possibly damage the catalytics. They can only absorb so much oil to burn up.

    I just saw a Porsche turbo with this very problem, but they put in about 6 quarts too much and ran the car---that requires an entire new exhaust system and a tune up, but other than that, it survived quite well.

    If you are just a quart over, a simple oil change and an "Italian tune up" (blasting the car on the freeway, which Ferraris need to do) might be all it needs. Not being on site, I hesitate to advise you other than having the car taken by truck to someplace that knows what they're doing---the reason being that severe engine damage on a car of this type and vintage brings it close to a total loss. It seems unnlikely there is serious damage because you weren't all that low on oil apparently.

    Just about any engine can tolerate a quart or so low.
  • THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOUR REPLY. WHAT IS THE IDEAL TEMP TO CHECK THE F1 OIL LEVEL, AND DO YOU KNOW WHERE I COULD FIND THE 50 WEIGHT FOR FUTURE REFERENCE. I AM IN THE CALABASAS AREA OF THE VALLEY.

    I WOULD LOVE TO GET HER ON A FLAT BED AND TO MY MECHANIC FOR THE MAJOR ENGINE HOIST AND $9,000.00 TREATMENT. TIMES ARE TOUGH LATELY, ESPECIALLY WITH A DIVORCE, AND MAJOR REINVESTING IN MY BUSINESS. BEING A SINGLE MOM WITH A FERRARI IN THIS ECONOMIC CRISIS, IS A [non-permissible content removed]. IN FACT, I AM PREPARING FOR AN ESTATE SALE TO GET THE FUNDS FOR THIS SERVICE. I'LL BE DAMNED IF I WILL GIVE UP AND SELL HER AT THE WORST TIME EVER. I'M TRYING EVERY WHICH WAY.
    IS THERE A FERRARI MECHANIC YOU WOULD REFER?

    THANKS AGAIN,
    355F1FUN ;)
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    Okay, I know you're freaking out here, but please turn off the caps. Makes it hard to read. Thanks!
  • You might call Michael Sheehan and ask if he can recommend anyone.

    I don't see why you need a major service here.

    I think checking the oil at ambient temperature is fine. If you checked it with the engine hot, that's probably what messed you up, as lots of oil stays on top of that engine for a while until it cools down.
  • I dropped my car for oil change and replacing brake pads. I had a noise coming from rear brake. So I brought my car back.

    I happened to see the oil filter when the car was lifted for brake check up. It was filthy and covered with dust. So I asked a guy if he did not change the oil filter. He replied that he changed oil filter, but the cartridge did not get changed.

    Does this sound right?

    Thanks
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,644
    Oh well if you have a cartridge-type filter, that means that a canister is opened up, a new cartridge installed and then the canister is screwed or bolted back on. So yeah, if this is what you have, then the canister might look a bit grungy.

    You might be confused by the terminology?

    Most cartridge type systems end up being a bit messy. On my MINI for instance, it's darn near impossible not to spill oil on the engine.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    You don't mention car make, year, mdl, or engine....so it's hard to know what type of oil filter you have.

    As Shifty indicated, you could have a canister, in which it is the inside paper filter that gets replaced. Or, you could have a screw on can type, where the whole filter gets replaced.

    But to be a little more specific on your oil change, when you get an oil change you should get oil AND filter changed. It's possible to not change the filter, but then you have a quart of dirty oil already in the filter, and the filter may be partially clogged with all the old stuff. Common practice is to replace oil and filter.

    If you go to an autoparts store, in the oil filter section, look up your make, model, engine....and the book will tell you what the filter is that your vehicle uses. Go to the shelf and look at the new filter.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,350
    What's with the return to cannister oil filters anyway?

    Back in the late sixties, as a kid working in a gas station some of the older cars used these and we hated them. They were messy to change and if you didn't get all of the o rings and gaskets lined up just right, they would leak and we would have to take them back apart.

    Now, these miserable things are coming back on quite a few cars I hear?

    What could the reasoning be for this?
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,644
    edited March 2010
    Safety for the engine. On a spin on filter, the only thing holding it to the engine is the pressure exerted on the gasket. If the gasket fails, the filter can just spin itself loose. Also, modern engines operate at pretty high oil pressures.

    All in all, I think cartridge filters are a good idea. A bolt usually holds them on.

    And yes, oil filters fall off and they can be blown off, too.

    If you think about the number of crappy, off-brand oil filters for sale, having to depend on the gasket of that type of discount-house filter is pretty risky.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,350
    edited March 2010
    Makes sense, I guess except in all of my time around thousands of shops I've never heard of an oil filter spinning itself loose or falling off but I'm sure it can happen.

    Maybe I shouldn't have thrown away my old suction gun?
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    Besides what Shifty said, I think it also has to to with the environment. With the cartridge filter, all of that perfectly good steel is thrown out, along with a lot of oil that can't be extracted (unless the filter is crushed flat first). With the canister filter, you don't throw away metal, and it's easier to extract the waste oil before disposal.
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